Week in Review - June 3, 2022

 


 

NASET

WEEK IN REVIEW

National Association of Special Education Teachers

June 3, 2022                 Vol 18 Issue #22



Dear NASET Members and Guests,

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW.  Here, we provide you with the latest publications fromNASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW at news@naset.org. Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,

WHATS NEW AT NASET

June 2022 - Special Educator e-Journal

Table of Contents

  • Special Education Legal Alert. By Perry A. Zirkel
  • Buzz from the Hub
  • Parental Right to Participate in Meetings
  • Right to Receive a Complete Explanation of IDEA’s Procedural Safeguards
  • Confidentiality and Access to Student Records
  • Requesting an Initial Evaluation for Special Education Services
  • Education Department Urges Colleges to Use American Rescue Plan Funds to Provide Mental Health Supports to Students
  • U.S. Department of Education Announces Intent to Strengthen and Protect Rights for Students with Disabilities by Amending Regulations Implementing Section 504
  • Office for Civil Rights Reaches Resolution Agreement with Nation’s Second Largest School District, Los Angeles Unified, to Meet Needs of Students with Disabilities during COVID-19 Pandemic
  • Acknowledgements

Read More


NASET ADVOCACY - Board Certification for Advocacy in Special Education (BCASE)


‘Sensory Canoes’ and Climbing Walls: Inside NYC’s Recovery Program for Students with Disabilities

Five-year-old Bradley often struggles to sit still and is prone to wandering. But on a recent Saturday morning, he was calm, sprawled on a bean bag chair in a Brooklyn classroom, the lights turned down, and his socks cast aside. The only glow came from four illuminated vertical tubes filled with bubbles and a laptop playing soothing piano music. One therapist narrated breathing exercises while another gently squeezed his arms and legs. Bradley, who has autism and is non-verbal, was participating in an education department program to help make up for occupational and physical therapies that were often difficult or impossible to deliver remotely. The initiative, called Sensory Exploration, Education & Discovery (SEED), serves students with disabilities who have sensory issues that are “dramatically impacting their school performance,” said Suzanne Sanchez, the education department’s senior director of therapy services who helps oversee the program. Read More

 

Eating More Fruits and Vegetables Can Reduce ADHD Symptoms Among Kids

There may be a much better way of treating a child’s attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms than using medication — and that’s by giving them a more nutritious diet. Researchers from The Ohio State University say children with ADHD who consume more fruits and vegetables see a significant drop in their levels of inattention. In a study of 134 kids displaying ADHD symptoms, those taking a 36-ingredient vitamin and mineral supplement were three times more likely to see an improvement in their ability to pay attention and regulate their emotions — compared to children taking a placebo. Read More

Visual System Brain Development Implicated in Infants who Develop Autism

For the first time, scientists have found that brain differences in the visual brain systems of infants who later are diagnosed with autism are associated with inherited genetic factors. Published in the American Journal of Psychiatry, this research shows that brain changes in the size, white matter integrity and functional connectivity of the visual processing systems of six-month olds are evident well before they show symptoms of autism as toddlers. Moreover, the presence of brain changes in the visual system is associated with the severity of autism traits in their older siblings. Led by Jessica Girault, PhD, assistant professor of psychiatry at the UNC School of Medicine, this is the first research to observe that infants with older siblings who have autism and who themselves later develop autism as toddlers, have specific biological differences in visual processing regions of the brain, and that these brain characteristics precede the appearance of autistic symptoms. Read More

How to Keep the Rigor in Differentiated Lessons

Differentiation, which is commonly viewed as a model for meeting students’ needs, is more accurately described as a set of beliefs about teaching and learning that are reflected as a set of practices. Rigor is creating an environment in which each student is expected to learn at high levels, each student is supported so he or she can learn at high levels, and each student demonstrates learning at high levels (Blackburn, 2008). Differentiation and rigor are both key facets of effective instruction. However, too often we think they are separate initiatives. In reality, they are very similar. Read More

The National Autism Indicators Report on Income and Race in Autism Healthcare

The National Autism Indicators Report, about how race and income affect the health status of individuals with autism was recently published in the United States. To gain a better understanding of income disparities between children with and without autism and how those disparities affect health, data from the National Survey of Children’s Health 2017-2020 were evaluated. More children with autism in the US lived in poor (25% vs 19%) or near-poor (28% vs 22%) households and fewer in middle-income (26% vs 28%) or high-income (21% vs 31%) households compared with children without autism, respectively. Read Mor

 


 


5 Reasons Why Disability Activism Is Still Hard

Disability activism can be exciting, empowering, and enormously fulfilling — especially for people with disabilities themselves. It can also be exhausting and frustrating. And to outside observers, newcomers, and longtime activists, disability activism can seem futile, maybe even fatally flawed. In 2017, disability activists were instrumental in fighting off efforts to abolish the Affordable Care Act and severely limit Medicaid. In 2020, most of the Presidential candidates felt it politically necessary to offer some kind of detailed disability policy plans.  A few of them were notably comprehensive and ambitious. But despite these encouraging signs of greater political influence over the last few years, the disability community still seems politically underdeveloped and underpowered. It’s worth thinking about exactly why. Here are five likely factors. Read More

Longer Duration of Exclusive Breastfeeding Has Protective Effect on Childhood Asthma

Pregnant women and new mothers are often presented with information on the benefits of breastfeeding their infants. A new study in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, the scientific journal of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) shows that a longer period of exclusive breastfeeding was associated with decreased odds of current asthma. "The results of the study indicated that the longer a mother exclusively breastfed, the lower the relative odds of her child having asthma, or asthma-related outcomes," said Keadrea Wilson, MD, lead author of the study and Assistant Professor of Neonatology at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. "There was a 'dose-response' effect depending on how long the mother breastfed: Babies that were breastfed for 2-4 months had only 64% likelihood of having as many asthma outcomes as those who were breastfed less than 2 months; those breastfed for 5-6 months had 61% likelihood, and those breastfed for more than 6 months had a 52% likelihood." Read More

Low-Dose ADHD Drugs Do Not Affect Thyroid Function, Growth Hormone at 1 Year

Among children diagnosed with ADHD, low doses of ADHD medications did not affect thyroid or growth hormone levels, according to study data. Trends in hormone indices of children with ADHD who received long-term medication treatment remain controversial, according to Liang-Jen Wang, MD, MPH, PhD, a visiting staff member in the department of child and adolescent psychiatry at Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, and colleagues. The researchers conducted the prospective study to determine any changes in the GH and thyroid hormone systems in children with ADHD receiving various drug therapies. Read More

Life is Hard for Middle and High Schoolers Who Struggle to Read. This Colorado Public School Aims to Help

Kaylee, an eighth-grader in a light blue hoodie, read a list of words, one by one, to teacher Jessica Thurby. She stumbled on a few: Debate came out “deblate,” sacred turned into “secret,” and defend became “define.” The pair went over the missed words. As Kaylee took another stab at “sacred,” she said, “It looked like the word “scared.” “It did,” Thurby said. “So, our brain automatically guessed. We’re trying to get out of that, remember?”For students who reach middle school without strong reading skills, these misread words turn into roadblocks that impede understanding and make it harder to learn. A new program at Alameda International Junior/Senior High School in Lakewood seeks to help. Read More

Teen Sleep, Brain Science and the Debate Over School Start Times

Scientists ran an unusual summer camp in the 1970s and ‘80s—and its main purpose was to study the sleep patterns of kids and teens. Campers actually wore electrodes all day so they’d be ready to plug in for monitoring. What researchers found, and have continued to study in the years since, is that teens have different, and greater, needs when it comes to sleep than people of other ages. But it turns out that plenty of schools make it hard for teens to get the amount of sleep that doctors recommend. This has led to heated debates in recent years over school start times. Advocates for later starts say that the issue is about more than whether teens have enough sleep to learn—there are serious implications for mental health as well. Read More



TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

THE TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK WILL RETURN ON JUNE 10, 2022


A Gift Horse Indeed: Equestrian Vaulting Opens Doors for Children with Disabilities

The first time Jarred Sallus tried equestrian vaulting, he was with his girlfriend, Kadriya Musina, in her native Russia. Within eight hours of his arrival, he was upside down on a horse. Sallus returned to the stables the next day, ready to learn more about the sport. His excitement led to the couple in 2019 co-founding Salt River Vaulters, a non-profit organization that makes it possible for children or adults with disabilities to participate in equine therapy and therapeutic vaulting. Sallus, whose early life struggles with behavioral issues saw him sent to boarding school in Sedona, soon found that horses were an avenue that could lead toward a peaceful, more tranquil life. Following boarding school, Sallus moved back to California, starting his journey with Luna, a horse that is now used at Salt River Vaulters. Read More

Curriculum Case Study: How Grade-Level Literacy Doubled in Just 2 Months in a Rural Tennessee District

“Ican actually read this!” kindergartner Easton Malone exclaimed while reading a book during Dr. Seuss Week this spring. Every teacher in primary grades longs to hear those words from their students. If you step foot in any of the classrooms from pre-K through second grade in Elizabethton City Schools, you are met with a palpable buzz of excitement and purpose as our youngest readers embrace a new reading approach. This enthusiasm has not always been present: getting to this point has been a journey. Elizabethton City Schools is a small, rural district nestled in the hills of East Tennessee where we spent years building a literacy model rooted in balanced literacy. Unfortunately, while we were meeting the needs of some of our students, we were not doing what was best for all students. Read More

Cystic Fibrosis: Restoring Airway Integrity

Cystic fibrosis is a rare genetic disease which can cause very serious symptoms. In particular, patients suffer from chronic bacterial infections that can lead to respiratory failure. It is caused by mutations in the CFTR gene, which regulates water movement across the cell membrane. Consequently, mucus quality is altered, it is no longer capable of capturing undesirable bacteria and expelling them. Using a model reproducing a respiratory epithelium -- a protective tissue composed of a monolayer of cells -- scientists have discovered that a simple film of liquid is sufficient to restore the airways' seal and reduce the risk of bacterial infection. Read Mor

 



Lehigh University Special Education Law Symposium

Lehigh University’s virtual Special Education Law Symposium returns from June 19-24. Sessions recorded for later viewing. Twenty-eight experienced special education attorneys from across the country will present eight new “hot topics” from the very latest case law: dyslexia legal update, stay put permutations, liability for abuse of students with disabilities, navigating compensatory services and compensatory education, settlement strategies, and more with a focus upon COVID-19 implications. Legally Basic and Legally Experienced tracks. The Section 504 Coordinators Institute is an overlapping, but separable two-day (June 23-24) component intended for school district Section 504 coordinators and others interested in this increasingly important anti-discrimination statute. Dr. Perry Zirkel (PA) and Jose Martin (TX) will respectively offer (a) an in-depth comparison of Section 504 and the IDEA and (b) legal nuances for IDEA-eligible students who also present unique Section 504 factors. Kathleen Sullivan (CO) and Judith Nedell (CT) offer a full day of practical solutions to basic and thorny 504 challenges. Week-long and per day symposium options available. Balance of school and parent viewpoints. For more information, see go.lehigh.edu/spedlaw, or call (610) 758-5557. Read More


Federal Workforce Participation Rate of People with Disabilities is Increasing, EEOC Report Finds

The federal workforce participation rate of people with disabilities has increased more than 8% since 2014, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission found in a report it released Thursday. People with disabilities (PWD) in 2018 made up 9.42% of federal employees; in 2014, the participation rate was 8.68%. Roughly 5% of employees declined to identify their disability status. The report demonstrated several other positive trends. While employees with disabilities comprised 11.2% of all new hires in 2018, falling below the permanent hiring goal of 12%, employment of people with targeted disabilities (PWTD) — those associated with high unemployment, such as deafness, blindness, paralysis and developmental disabilities — exceeded the goal of 2% for that group, with 2.36% of new hires having targeted disabilities. In addition, the report found that PWD and PWTD “were promoted at a rate similar to what would be expected based on their participation rate.” Read More

 

Tools for Supporting Students with Reading Disabilities

I’ll never forget the wide-eyed look and broad smile on a fourth-grader’s face when I asked him if he was willing to read in a different way. He had a reading disability, and I had just taken him to the school library and told him to choose any chapter books that he was interested in reading, not just the “baby books”—his words—that he could independently decode. His picks were available and downloaded within minutes from Bookshare, an Office of Special Education Programs-funded organization that provides a vast library of free accessible ebooks for students with print disabilities who qualify. This intersection of choice, self-determination, and technology was powerful—it started an entire new chapter of self-confidence and independence for this student. Read More



JOB POSTINGS

*Special Education Teacher - The Special Education Teacher will teach at one of our Network campuses. The Special Education Teacher will be responsible for planning lessons and curricula, administering assessments, collecting and analyzing data, and relentlessly supporting students to achieve academic excellence. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Guides the learning process toward the achievement of IEP goals, establishes clear objectives for all lessons, units, and projects, and is able to communicate effectively with students, staff, and parents as supervised by the building principal. To learn more- Click here

* [2022-2023] High School Learning Specialist - Reporting to the Academic Dean, the High School Learning Specialist will be responsible for building meaningful relationships with students, implementing a Common Core-aligned curriculum, and working with their grade team to analyze data to drive instruction. This is an exciting opportunity for an educator who is passionate about improving student outcomes by leading excellent instruction and building a positive school culture. To learn more- Click here

* Special Ed Intellectual Disabilities Teacher, ES, MS, HS - Provides and is accountable for the planning, assessment, instruction, communication, human relations, safety, and management of a classroom or assigned instructional setting. Supports FCPS mission to "inspire, enable, and empower students to meet high academic standards, lead ethical lives, and demonstrate responsible citizenship." To learn more- Click here

* Special Ed Learning Disabilities Teacher, ES, MS, HS - Provides and is accountable for the planning, assessment, instruction, communication, human relations, safety, and management of a classroom or assigned instructional setting. Supports FCPS mission to "inspire, enable, and empower students to meet high academic standards, lead ethical lives, and demonstrate responsible citizenship." To learn more- Click here

* Special Ed Multiple Disabilities Teacher, ES, MS, HS - Provides and is accountable for the planning, assessment, instruction, communication, human relations, safety, and management of a classroom or assigned instructional setting. Supports FCPS mission to "inspire, enable, and empower students to meet high academic standards, lead ethical lives, and demonstrate responsible citizenship." To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Autism - Responsible for planning, implementing, and evaluating instructional activities for special education students. Create a flexible class environment favorable to learning and personal growth; establish effective rapport with students; motivate students to develop skills, attitudes, and knowledge in accordance with each student’s ability; and establish good relationships with parents and other staff members. To learn more- Click here

* Middle School Special Education (Directed Studies) Language Arts Teacher - The Upper School Special Education (Directed Studies) Language Arts Teacher is given the duty of instructing students on such a level as to allow them to obtain proficiency in their subject levels at a grade-appropriate level. To learn more- Click here

* Rockstar Elementary Trained Special Education Teacher - Our school works as a team. If you are looking for a job where you can fulfill your passion for working with students with learning differences, we would like to hear from you. As one of the few schools in Oregon devoted to students with learning differences and the only one focused exclusively on middle school, Bridges offers its 5th through 8th grade students small class sizes, differentiated instruction, and a safe place to learn and grow. To learn more- Click here

* Educational Specialist - Environmental Charter Schools is seeking a talented and dynamic Educational Specialist with a Moderate/Severe credential who is passionate about ensuring educational equity for students with exceptionalities. This position provides the opportunity to partner with special education and general education teachers across three campuses in order to prepare low-income students of color with exceptionalities for college success. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher - We are recruiting for three Special Education Teachers to serve Quest Academy Day Treatment Center in Longview, WA for the 2022-2023 school year. These positions are full time, 192 day contracts. To learn more- Click here

* Coordinator of Academic and Disability Services - Centenary College of Louisiana invites applications for the position of Coordinator of Academic and Disability Services. This is a full-time, twelve-month position. Reporting to the Director of the Center for Teaching and Learning, the Coordinator will work closely with the College’s student success team and faculty to coordinate academic support and disability services in accordance with the ADA and in support of Centenary’s mission to prepare global citizens to live productive lives of vitality and purpose. To learn more- Click here

* The SEED Public Charter School of Washington DC:  Multiple Positions - SEED DC is looking for its new cohort of intentional, proactive, and enthusiastic teachers in Washington, D.C. As a SEED DC teacher, you’ll teach SEED DC’s curriculum in dynamic, participation-oriented classes and cultivate a learning environment that supports and encourages students to develop and realize their academic potential. You’ll also collaborate with other instructional staff, school personnel, and SEED DC’s senior leadership team to help advance SEED’s mission of supporting scholars to and through college completion. To learn more- Click here

* Coordinator, Life and Career Studies - Residential Program for Students with Intellectual Disabilities - Lakeland University seeks a mission-oriented individual passionate about creating a more inclusive world to develop and coordinate an innovative program for students with intellectual disability slated to open on its Sheboygan campus in Fall 2023. This four-year residential program is designed to prepare students for meaningful employment, as well as independent and community living. The coordinator will play an important leadership role in designing the program as well as overseeing its implementation. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher - The Moffat County School District truly believes that students, staff, families and community all play a vital role in the success and growth of our students and school district as a whole. As our district works on getting back to a new normal the following statement has never been more true than it is today. Moffat County School District strives to find qualified, skilled and motivated individuals to join our great team that is committed to educate and inspire students to thrive in an environment of change. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher - The Halton School, an independent school for students with Asperger’s, is looking for a Special Education teacher. The teacher will provide special education instruction to students in a small multi-grade class. The teacher will utilize a variety of teaching methods to meet students' educational needs and adapt and develop instructional materials accordingly. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher (Multiple Positions) - Located in the Salish Sea off the northwest coast of Washington State, San Juan Island is the largest of the many islands in the world-famous archipelago of the same name. Approximately seven thousand permanent residents share this fifty-five square mile natural paradise. Connected to the mainland by ferry, float plane and small airlines, island living combines a cohesive small-town community with comprehensive services and commercial diversity unusual in a rural setting. The community has a comprehensive library, a state-of-the-art theater that features diverse performing arts, many wonderful restaurants, an historic museum, two national parks, miles of public shoreline, and a vibrant agricultural community. To learn more- Click here

* Strategist II: ID Teacher - Join Ames Community School District, where your journey matters! ACSD promotes an educational environment that is racially, ethnically, linguistically, and culturally diverse to broaden students' academic experience and to enrich our District. We are focused on creating and supporting diversity, equity, and inclusion within the organizational culture and in our community. To learn more- Click here

* Integrated Services Teacher - Join Ames Community School District, where your journey matters! ACSD promotes an educational environment that is racially, ethnically, linguistically, and culturally diverse to broaden students' academic experience and to enrich our District. We are focused on creating and supporting diversity, equity, and inclusion within the organizational culture and in our community. To learn more- Click here

* Strategist I Teacher - Join Ames Community School District, where your journey matters! ACSD promotes an educational environment that is racially, ethnically, linguistically, and culturally diverse to broaden students' academic experience and to enrich our District. We are focused on creating and supporting diversity, equity, and inclusion within the organizational culture and in our community. To learn more- Click here

* Behavior Interventionist - Join Ames Community School District, where your journey matters! ACSD promotes an educational environment that is racially, ethnically, linguistically, and culturally diverse to broaden students' academic experience and to enrich our District. We are focused on creating and supporting diversity, equity, and inclusion within the organizational culture and in our community. To learn more- Click here

If you are an Employer looking for excellent special education staff - Click here for more information


FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Sometimes the questions are complicated and the answers are simple. Dr. Seuss

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