Week in Review - April 17, 2015

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WEEK IN REVIEW

New NASET Publications and Articles of Interest in Special Education and Disabilities That Were Reported This Week

April 17, 2015 - Vol 11, Issue 16

 

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In This Issue

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Dear NASET News,

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW Here, we provide you with the latest publications from NASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW at news@naset.org. Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,


NASET News Team

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New This Week on NASET

NASET's Educating Children with Severe Disabilities Series
Comprehensive Overview of Other Health Impairments

IDEA Definition of Other Health Impairments
According to IDEA, an Other Health Impairment is defined as:
Other health impairment means having limited strength, vitality or alertness, including a heightened alertness to environmental stimuli, that results in limited alertness with respect to the educational environment, that:

(i) is due to chronic or acute health problems such as asthma, attention deficit disorder or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, diabetes, epilepsy, a heart condition, hemophilia, lead poisoning, leukemia, nephritis, rheumatic fever, and sickle cell anemia; and
(ii) adversely affects a child's educational performance [34 C.F.R. 300.7(c)(9)].

To read or download this issue - Click here (login required)

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Assessment in Special Education Series
Part XVI

Comprehensive Tests of Academic Achievement
Assessing academic achievement is a vital component of the assessment process. Understanding where a child has strengths and weaknesses in academic areas is necessary if you are going to diagnose a possible disability. There are numerous areas professionals can assess when giving an achievement test. Regardless of the number of areas, reading, writing, math, and spelling are part of every initial assessment battery for possible classification and/or placement in special education. We always need to know how a child compares academically, relative to the norms of the population. Therefore, all special educators should be able to read scores from achievement tests and, at a minimum, have a general understanding of what the assessment measures test and the purpose of the testing. For those who must administer achievement batteries, it is essential that a complete, thorough, valid, and reliable battery be given. This issue of NASET'sAssessment in Special Education Series will focus on the latest comprehensive tests of academic achievement. These tests normally offer a thorough approach to the assessment of a child's strengths and weaknesses in reading, writing, math, and spelling.

To read or download this issue - Click here (login required)

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Brain Scans May Predict Language Skills in Kids With Autism

Sophisticated imaging tests could provide clues to how well a child with an autism spectrum disorder may develop language skills, possibly as early as when the child is just a year old, a new study suggests. "We discovered that at the very first signs of autism in infants and toddlers, language-important brain regions already displayed striking differences between those who later had good versus poor language outcomes," said study co-author Eric Courchesne, a professor of neurosciences and co-director of the Autism Center of Excellence at the University of California, San Diego. The findings also revealed brain differences of two possible subtypes of autism, one "language-learning ready" and one not, he said. "The two subtypes likely have different causes, mechanisms, processes, language-learning potential and treatment-responsiveness potential," Courchesne said. To read more, click here

Senate Plan Retains Testing Cap For Students With Disabilities

A bipartisan plan to reshape the nation's primary education law would maintain strict limits on the number of students with disabilities taking less rigorous tests. After months of negotiation, the top Republican and Democrat on the U.S. Senate education committee released a joint proposal this week to update the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, known as No Child Left Behind. The Senate education panel is slated to consider the bill next week. Currently, students with severe cognitive disabilities are allowed to take alternate assessments in lieu of the general, grade-level tests mandated for most children. However, only 1 percent of all students - or about 10 percent of those with disabilities - may be counted as proficient by schools for taking alternate exams. To read more, click here

Women Born Early at Greater Risk of Delivering Preemies, Study Suggests

Women who were born prematurely may be more likely to deliver their own babies early, a new study suggests. Canadian researchers found that the odds of delivering a preterm infant -- born before 37 weeks of pregnancy -- rose more than 40 percent for women who were born between 32 and 36 weeks themselves, regardless of other risk factors. What's more, the earlier in pregnancy a woman had been born, the higher the risk of a similar fate for her offspring. "We don't know whether it's a genetic cause or something that's set differently in a woman because she was born preterm, or if it's a combination of both," said study author Dr. Anne-Monique Nuyt, head of the division of neonatology at Sainte-Justine University Hospital and Research Center in Montreal. To read more, click here

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NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

Fewer U.S. Children Getting Melanoma: Study

The incidence of deadly melanoma skin cancer is falling among American children, a new study finds. Researchers led by Dr. Lisa Campbell, of Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals (UH) Case Medical Center in Cleveland, looked at national cancer registry data from 2000 to 2010. They found that the overall number of new melanoma cases among children fell 12 percent each year from 2004 to 2010. The reasons? Campbell's team cited effective public outreach on the danger of UV rays from the sun or tanning beds, more kids playing indoors rather than outdoors and a rise in parental awareness of the importance of sunscreen and other sun-protective measures. To read more, click here

NASET Members Only

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Guess the answer to this week's trivia question and we'll recognize you in next week's Week in Review.
Congratulations to: Stacey Tapper, Marie Wise-Miu, Marilyn Haile, Olumide Akerele, Ope-Oluwa Olubela, Andrea DeMeo and Laurine Kennedy
who all knew the answer to last week's trivia question: According to the U.S. Department of Education, over the past 5 years, have the annual number of complaints related to disability discrimination in U.S. schools increased, decreased or remained relatively the same? ANSWER:  INCREASED
THIS WEEK'S TRIVIA QUESTION:
According to the latest research in the field, children who experience trauma such as divorce, death of a parent or domestic violence are more likely to develop which specific health impairment than other kids?
If you know the answer, send an email to contactus@naset.org
All answers must be submitted no later than Monday, April 20, 2015 at 12:00 p.m.

Mom Ticketed After Son With Autism Wanders Off

When a 4-year-old boy with autism wandered away from home, his mother got more than she bargained for when police returned him. Kaava Watson, 31, said her son, Walter, disappeared last Thursday evening when she went to answer the telephone. Watson told KETV that she went to look for the boy - who has a history of wandering - and called police when she couldn't find him near their Omaha, Neb. home. Meanwhile, however, 911 dispatchers received a separate report of an unaccompanied child on a nearby street. To read more, click here

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Asthma Rates Similar Among Black Children in Urban, Rural Areas: Study

Asthma rates are essentially identical among black children living in Detroit and rural Georgia, researchers report. The finding challenges the common belief that living in a city boosts the chances of developing the respiratory condition, the study authors said.

Instead, poverty may be what increases asthma risk, the study results suggested. "The things these children have in common include high rates of poverty, asthma and being black," corresponding study author Dr. Dennis Ownby, an allergist-immunologist at the Medical College of Georgia, said in a college news release. To read more, click here

Children with Neurological Disorders Need Flu Vaccine but Don't Always Get It

Children who have neurological disorders such as cerebral palsy or epilepsy are no more likely to be vaccinated against influenza than youngsters without these conditions, despite the increased risk for complications from flu these children experience. Moreover, health care providers may not be familiar with the increased risk among these patients to effectively recommend influenza vaccine. To read more, click here

Migraine Drug May Up Risk of Eating Disorders in Some Teens

A new report has linked a migraine medication to increased odds of eating disorders in some teens. The drug in question is called topiramate (Topamax). It's an established migraine drug for adults that was just approved for use in teens in 2014. Appetite reduction and weight loss are common side effects of the drug, according to the report authors. "For most kids, it's a great medicine, but for a handful of kids the weight loss can trigger symptoms of an eating disorder," said report author Jocelyn Lebow, a child and adolescent psychologist for the eating disorders treatment program at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. To read more, click here

Rates of ADHD Appear to Decrease at Higher Altitudes

Recent research has linked the thin air of higher elevations to increased rates of depression and suicide. But a new study shows there's also good news from up in the aspens and pines: The prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) decreases substantially as altitude increases. In Utah, for example, an analysis of information from two national health surveys correlated with the average state elevation of 6,100 feet showed that the rate of diagnosed ADHD cases is about 50 percent of states at sea level. In Salt Lake City, whose elevation is about 4,300 feet, diagnosed ADHD prevalence is approximately 38 percent less than at sea level. To read more, click here

NASET - Members Only Savings

NASET is pleased to provide our members with exclusive access to discounts on products and services. These savings are available to all current NASET members. To find out more about savings from Life Lock, Avis, Budget, Cruises Only, Orlando Vacations and more - Click here

In Rare Cases, Kids Can Get Food Allergies From Donated Blood

The case of an 8-year-old Canadian boy suggests that it's possible, but still rare, for children to get food allergies from blood transfusions. The boy developed an allergy to fish and peanuts after receiving a transfusion from a donor with severe allergies to these foods, reports a team led by Dr. Julia Upton, of The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. He was treated promptly for the allergic reactions, and the allergies went away on their own within a few months, the researchers noted. In the April 7 issue of the Canadian Medical Association Journal, Upton's team explains that blood donors with food allergies can transfer an allergy-triggering antibody called immunoglobulin E (IgE) in blood products such as platelets. To read more, click here

Study of Brain Networks Shows Differences in Children with OCD

Communication between some of the brain's most important centers is altered in children with obsessive-compulsive disorder, a new study shows. The results are highly consistent with observations in the clinic, said a researcher. "Children with OCD are beset by preoccupations and can't easily move on from certain tasks and behaviors. As all complex behavior arises from brain networks, being trapped in this mode must arise from impaired brain network interactions in OCD. In our previous studies we had focused on assessing the structure and the neurochemistry of the anterior cingulate. We had long suspected that brain network interactions originating in this region are impaired in the disorder. But this is the first study to clearly demonstrate this." To read more, click here

Placenta Test Measures Babies' Exposure to Arsenic

A pregnant woman's placenta can reliably measure exposure to the toxic metal arsenic in both the mother and her unborn baby, new research finds. "Our findings show placental arsenic concentrations reflect both maternal and fetal biomarker concentrations," said the study's lead author, Tracy Punshon, a research assistant professor of biological sciences at Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H. Arsenic, a carcinogen, occurs naturally in soil, water and air. Previous research has shown that it crosses the placenta and may affect fetal development, according to background notes with the study. Contaminated well water is one source of arsenic exposure. To read more, click here

AASEP Logo

NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

Bullying by Students with Disabilities Reduced by Social-Emotional Learning

Peer victimization -- bullying -- declined 20 percent among students with disabilities who participated in Second Step social-emotional learning curricula, authors of a new study report. More than 120 students with disabilities at two school districts in the Midwest United States participated in the research, which was part of a larger three-year clinical trial of the widely used social-emotional learning curricula Second Step. To read more,click here

Teens Seen in ERs for Assault at Risk for Later Gun Violence: Study

New research suggests that the emergency room might be a good place to try to end the vicious cycle of gun violence among young adults. "This study shows that youth seen and treated in urban emergency departments for an assault also have an elevated risk for severe forms of violence, including firearm violence, over the next two years," Dr. Patrick Carter, an assistant professor of emergency medicine and member of the University of Michigan Injury Center, said in a university news release. These teens and young adults are nearly 60 percent more likely to be involved in a future incident involving a firearm, the researchers reported. To read more, click here

Non-Invasive Technique Allows Amputee to Use Bionic Hand, Powered by His Thoughts

A research team from the University of Houston has created an algorithm that allowed a man to grasp a bottle and other objects with a prosthetic hand, powered only by his thoughts. The technique, demonstrated with a 56-year-old man whose right hand had been amputated, uses non-invasive brain monitoring, capturing brain activity to determine what parts of the brain are involved in grasping an object. With that information, researchers created a computer program, or brain-machine interface (BMI), that harnessed the subject's intentions and allowed him to successfully grasp objects, including a water bottle and a credit card. The subject grasped the selected objects 80 percent of the time using a high-tech bionic hand fitted to the amputee's stump. To read more, click here

Honor Society for Special Education Teachers

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Large-Scale Study To Look For Causes of ASD

Kaiser Permanente is about to begin what is believed to be the largest genetic research project ever conducted by a health organization into the causes of autism, gathering biological and other health information from 5,000 Northern California families who have a child with the developmental disorder. Scientists have long suspected that autism results from a combination of genetics and environmental factors, but no one knows for sure. They hope a study of this size will reveal the root causes that could eventually lead to improved diagnoses and new treatments. To read more, click here

Federal Government Calls For Expanded Mental Health Coverage

Federal officials want Medicaid to beef up access to mental health care for individuals with disabilities and other beneficiaries. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services is proposing new regulations that would require Medicaid to cover mental health services at the same level as other medical and surgical services. The rule would hold Medicaid to the standard established under a federal law requiring mental health parity that was passed in 2008. Similar regulations issued in 2013 already require most private health insurance plans to cover mental health services at the same level as physical ailments in accordance with the parity law. To read more, click here

jobsNASET's Latest Job Listings

* Resource Specialist Teacher - RSP teachers will review and revise IEP's as needed. The Resource Specialist will support instruction in reading, math, and written language for students, tutor individual and small groups of students, administer and score academic testing, write individualized education plans and support other academic programs as needed. To learn more - Click here

 

*Special Education Teachers for 2015-2016 - Lighthouse Academies is a growing, national network of charter schools that is dedicated to providing transformational opportunities in underserved urban areas. Our K-12 model is distinguished by rigorous, arts-infused academic programs complemented by social and cultural foundations needed to succeed in and graduate from college. To learn more - Click here


* Early Child Autism Teacher - Our students need your expertise, passion and leadership. We are looking for highly motivated and skilled talent to join our team at the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS). To learn more -Click here


* Self Contained Classroom Special Education Teacher - $46,000/year with 16 weeks off. Special Education Teachers needed in Arizona (Phoenix and surrounding cities). Needs are in the self-contained setting serving students with emotional disabilities (ED), Autism (A), Severe/Profound (S/P), and Intellectual Disabilities (ID). To learn more - Click here


* Teacher - The Help Group is the largest, most innovative and comprehensive nonprofit organization of its kind in the United States serving children with special needs related to autism, Asperger's disorder, learning disabilities, ADHD, mental retardation, abuse and emotional problems. To learn more - Click here


* Executive Dir of Special Education and Student Srv - Provides vision, leadership, oversight and evaluation for the Department of Special Education, Alternative Education, Health Services, Pupil Personnel, School Counseling and School Psychology. To learn more - Click here


* Special Education Teacher: $125K Salary - Earn a $125,000 salary and join a team of master teachers at The Equity Project (TEP) Charter School, recently featured on the front page of the New York Times. To learn more -Click here


* Director of Student Supports - RePublic is searching for passionate, bold, and gritty Directors of Student Supports (Special Education) ready to lock arms with the teasm at Liberty Collegiate, Nashville Prep and RePublic High for the 2015-16 school year. To learn more - Click here


* Teacher - We are looking for highly motivated and skilled talent to join our team at the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS). We seek individuals who are passionate about transforming and improving educational outcomes for our students. To learn more - Click here


* Learning Specialist - The New School of San Francisco is a K-12 public charter school, demonstrating a "hands-on, minds-on" approach to learning that harnesses each student's curiosity and encourages learners to construct their own meaning and knowledge through hands-on experiences. To learn more - Click here

Food For Thought..........

Progress is impossible without change, and those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything. George Bernard Shaw