Week in Review - October 7, 2022


 

NASET

WEEK IN REVIEW

National Association of Special Education Teachers

October 7, 2022                 Vol 18 Issue #40


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Dear NASET Members and Guests,

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW.  Here, we provide you with the latest publications fromNASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW at news@naset.org. Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,

 

WHATS NEW AT NASET

NASET’s LD Report

Supporting the Mental Health of Students with Dyslexia: What Educators Can Do?

 

By

Breanna Smith & Nai-Cheng Kuo

Augusta University

This issue os NASET’s LD Report was written by Breanna Smith & Nai-Cheng Kuo from Augusta University. Educators need to be aware of the complexities of dyslexia to support the mental health of students with dyslexia. Due to neurological disorders, these students process information differently from their peers without dyslexia, which affects their communication, functioning, and emotions. The purposes of this article are twofold. First, we review the current literature on the relationship between dyslexia and mental health problems to highlight the importance of early identification and support systems. Second, based on those findings, we discuss actions educators can take to serve students with dyslexia and their families better. Our synthesis of research studies indicates dyslexia and mental health problems are often intertwined. Educators can contribute at least five aspects to improving the mental health of individuals with dyslexia and creating a healthy learning environment for them: 1) raising awareness, 2) identifying internalizing and externalizing problems, 3) collaborating with stakeholders, 4) advocating for dyslexia, and 5) providing direct services. 

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NASET ADVOCACY - Board Certification for Advocacy in Special Education (BCASE)


Creating Support Ecosystems for Neurodivergent Learners

Since March 2020, we have all assuredly witnessed firsthand the importance of our community – our friends, family, co-workers, and loved ones who supported us, helped us deal with the layers of adversity, and played a critical role in helping us come out of the pandemic stronger. While ecosystems are important to all individuals, they are especially crucial to the caregivers and families of neurodivergent learners. Ecosystems for these individuals help provide a sense of belonging for those going through similar experiences, but also serve as a community or network of confidantes and advisors who can help give families direction when time is of the essence. Educational professionals play a starring role in learner ecosystems and help bolster them as they provide a listening ear, a credible source of support and validate recommendations to parents. Read More

5 Ways to Elevate the Effective Teaching Happening in Your School

When I started teaching in the ’90s, I was a bit like Tom Hanks in Castaway. I lived on my little island. I created my lessons independently. Sometimes those lessons were good, and other times not so much. How many learning opportunities were missed in my development as an educator? As an administrator for 14 years, I have had the opportunity to walk into classrooms daily, and I’ve seen so many amazing lessons over the years. I have left many rooms feeling inspired and proud to have such talented educators in my school and district. It left me wondering if there were teachers who were that good when I was a new teacher. The more we can spotlight great teaching practice and demonstrate that it can be done with the students in our school or district, the better all teachers will become. Here are a few ways to highlight the best teachers in your school to scale effective practices. Read More

Duke Receives $12 Million Grant for Research to Detect Autism Using AI

Detecting autism as quickly as possible can be hugely consequential in the lives of those who are affected by Autism Spectrum Disorder. So how do we do it? The Duke Center for Autism and Brain Development was recently awarded a $12 million federal grant to fund research for detecting autism during infancy using artificial intelligence. The funding, which comes from the National Institute of Child Health and Early Development, will continue the Autism Center’s research program for five more years.  “It's very important that we detect autism as early as possible, because we know that providing behavioral intervention can make a big difference in kids’ outcome,” said Geraldine Dawson, director of the Autism Center. Dawson leads the project’s research team. The $12 million grant will fund a three-part research program. Read More

Offering Support to Neurodiverse and Neurotypical Children as They Return to School

Across the United States, the new school year has begun. A new year and a new grade entail many changes, unfamiliar routines, and meeting new people. Parents understandably worry about their children making these transitions. Making matters more complicated is over the past two years, children's education has largely taken the form of video conferencing instead of class time, emails instead of group lessons, and frustration – for both the children and parents – over learning. Furthermore, reading scores have declined. A recent HP Instant Ink survey polled 1,000 parents of children under 18, digging into what stressors parents face this school year. The survey, Back to Basics: Parents Looking to Traditional Classroom Tools to Make Up Lost Learning Time, shows parents face unprecedented pressures to ensure their children make the most of this school year. Read More


 


High-Quality Classwork + Tutoring: Proven Recipe for Closing the Learning Gap

Imagine you are making a cake for a loved one and serving it later in the day. You don’t have a lot of time. Do you opt for the tried-and-true family recipe or just put together the key ingredients — some flour, eggs, butter and baking soda — until it feels right? Schools have a similar decision to make as they build a package of strategies to advance learning recovery: Do they address unfinished learning with proven solutions or design their own? The research is clear: Students across the board have lost months of precious learning, with at-risk students losing much more. Addressing the magnitude of the problem means providing targeted support and delivering big learning gains. Read More

How Collaborative Care Models Deliver Quality ADHD Care – Seamlessly

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is highly treatable, yet systemic barriers — from cost and lack of pediatric services to fragmented care systems — often hinder identification of ADHD in children and/or prevent them from receiving optimal care. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), primary care providers often view ADHD as distinct from other pediatric conditions and outside the scope of primary care. What’s more, only one-third of school-aged children diagnosed with ADHD receive both medication and behavioral therapy to treat the condition, as recommended by the AAP. Fragmented, unreliable care is ineffective care for children with ADHD — and most providers and caregivers feel powerless to affect change. Read More

Solving Math through Conversation Leads to Better Understanding

Math conferences between teachers and students can help broaden their understanding of a new concept as they work through problems. Allowing students time to ask questions or hear responses from their peers provides an active learning opportunity that can help strengthen their grasp of mathematics. These conversations can start as early as elementary school and continue through middle and high school. “When teachers are able to talk to students and have them make their thinking visible, they can then support that student to engage more deeply in mathematics, support their making connections, and help them build on their learning,” said Trena Wilkerson, president of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. Read More

 



TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Congratulations to: Bonnie Baldwin, Katrina Snider, Lauro Esquilona III, Michelle Kalos, Bill Ferguson, Wanda J. Routier, Patsy Ray, Tracey Christilles, Diane Campbell-Mitchell, and Karen Frantz-Fry who all knew the answer to last week's trivia question:

 According to recent research published in Disability and Health Journal examining 2020 death certificate data patterns for people with or without an intellectual and developmental disability (IDD), for those without an IDD, this was the third leading cause of death in 2020, following heart disease and cancer. But for those with IDD, this was the number one cause of death in 2020. IDD are conditions characterized by life-long impairments in mobility, language, learning, self-care, and independent living. The study confirms earlier predictions that this diagnosis would be deadlier among people with IDD, says Scott Landes, associate professor at Syracuse University and lead author of the paper. What was the number one cause of death for individuals with intellectual disabilities in 2020?

Answer: COVID-19

This week's trivia question: According to recent research in the field, there is a growing U.S. shortage of a prescription drug taken to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. More than six in 10 small pharmacies reported having difficulty in August obtaining the medication, based on a survey from the National Community Pharmacists Association. Quotas on how much of this medication can be made is also affecting its supply. What is this commonly prescribed ADHD medication?

If you know the answer to this week's trivia questions, email it to us at contactus@naset.org by October 11, 2022. If you are correct, you will be acknowledged in next week's NASET's Week in Review


Virtual Reality Shows Promise in Diagnosing Learning Disabilities

Virtual reality technology may offer promising new opportunities in diagnosing vision problems and learning disabilities such as dyslexia in children, according to a presentation at Vision Expo West. Jeffrey Williamson, BS, MS, MBA, CEO of Engineus and one of the creators of the VisionWearX multisensory screening and diagnosis tool, and Zeshan Khan, BS, MS, founder and CEO of Xenon-VR, said virtual reality can simulate a dyslexic lens in a virtual testing environment by stimulating the brain the same way that commercially available tinted lenses do in patients with dyslexia. Read More

Children with ADHD Do Not Show Reduced Dual-Task Performance

Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can text while walking as easily as children without ADHD; however, characteristics such as age and ADHD symptom severity may cause dual-task hindrance, according to findings published in Gait & Posture. Researchers sought to examine texting while walking performance among children with ADHD, assessing symptom severity and the role of age in dual-task functioning. They conducted a study that included children with ADHD between the ages of 10 and 18 years who owned a mobile phone for more than 6 months, were able to type sentences using the mobile phone, and were native Hebrew speakers. Read More

5 Best, Worst Cities for People with Disabilities

Minneapolis is the best city in the U.S. for people with disabilities, according to an analysis by WalletHub, a personal finance website. To identify the best and worst cities for people with disabilities, analysts compared 182 U.S. cities, including the 150 most populated cities, on 34 metrics of disability-friendliness, ranging from graduation rate for students with disabilities to wheelchair-accessible grocery stores per capita. Each of the metrics fell into one of the following categories: quality of life, healthcare or economy. Read more about the methodology here. Here are the five best cities for people with disabilities, according to the analysis. Read More



Utah Parents Rally for Better Inclusion of Students with Intellectual Disabilities

Utah parents said some children are excluded from schools for their intellectual disabilities. A parent advocacy group told 2News the children are often bused to schools far from their neighborhoods, and that needs to change. To help educate and raise awareness, the non-profit group "We All Belong" is holding an event to advocate for the 1% of students who fall into the category of severe intellectual disability. Oakley Peterson is a board member of the group. She has a 9-year-old son with down syndrome and has been fighting to ensure that her son and children like him can attend schools in their community instead of being bused elsewhere for their education. Read More

Air Pollution Tied to Autism-Related Hospital Admissions in Children

Short-term exposure to air pollution is associated with an increased risk for hospital admission for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in children, according to a study published online Sept. 20 in BMJ Open. Kyoung-Nam Kim, Ph.D., from the Ajou University School of Medicine Suwon, South Korea, and colleagues used data from the National Health Insurance Service for 2011 to 2015 to examine the effects of short-term exposure to air pollution on hospital admission for ASD among Korean children aged 5 to 14 years. Exposures were daily concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM2.5), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and ozone (O3) levels in each region. Read More

California Governor Rejects Mandatory Kindergarten Law

Beyond what they learn academically in kindergarten, students learn everyday routines: how to take care of class materials and how to be kind to their peers, according to Golden Empire Elementary School kindergarten teacher Carla Randazzo. While developing those skills became more difficult for students going to school online during the pandemic, occasionally, a student entering first grade at Golden Empire didn’t attend kindergarten at all, Randazzo said. Nearly two-thirds of students at the Sacramento school are English learners. “Those kids just start out having to climb uphill,” she said. “They need a lot of support to be successful.” Randazzo always thought it was “peculiar” that kindergarten is not mandatory in California. For now, though, California won’t join 20 other states with mandatory kindergarten. Read More

Colorado Faces Federal Civil Rights Complaint on Enrollment for Students with Disabilities

A complaint filed with the U.S. Department of Education claims the Colorado Board of Education denied enrollment for students with disabilities in the schools of their choice. According to current state law, every school district in Colorado allows all students in and outside of that district to seek enrollment there. However, the complaint alleges districts use this law and the flexibility they have under it to deny students with disabilities entry into their programs. The complaint, filed with the department’s Office for Civil Rights, requests an investigation under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, which ensures a free appropriate public education for special needs students, and Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act, which requires that programs reasonably modify services to protect against disability discrimination. Read More

Schools Are Adding Counselors. But Can They Make the Gains Permanent?

For years now, there’s been a growing push to provide more and better counseling services to students at all levels of the public school system. But in the last two-and-a-half years, especially, the need for counseling professionals has been recognized like never before. Thanks to that burgeoning public awareness, plus hundreds of millions of dollars in federal relief funding for schools, districts have been able to beef up their counseling staffs and better serve the students in their care—a reality that is bearing out in national data and in local success stories alike. Earlier this year, the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) released numbers from the 2020-21 school year, using data collected by the National Center for Education Statistics. Read More

 



JOB POSTINGS

* [Immediate Hire] Middle School Math Learning Specialist - Reporting to the Academic Dean, the Middle School Math Learning Specialist will be responsible for building meaningful relationships with students, implementing a Common Core-aligned curriculum, and working with their grade team to analyze data to drive instruction. This is an exciting opportunity for an educator who is passionate about improving student outcomes by leading excellent instruction and building a positive school culture. To learn more- Click here

* [2022-2023] Middle School Learning Specialist - Reporting to the Academic Dean, the Learning Specialist will be responsible for providing tailored support to students with special education needs, through integrated co-teaching, in small group settings, or a combination of both. This is an exciting opportunity for a seasoned educator who is passionate about ensuring all students succeed and thrive in school. To learn more- Click here

* School Principal - We strive to give our clients support, resources, and the ability to heal through the work of animal-assisted therapy and nature-based learning all while developing the skills and confidence to grow into independent young adults. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher (Sign on Bonus) - The Special Education Teacher works closely with all members of the dedicated, inter-disciplinary therapeutic team supporting the students and classroom. Teachers also collaborate with parents and guardians to ensure the greatest wrap around services, school -to-home communications, and understanding of the student. Collaboration with our partnering school districts is also essential. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Hope Learning Academy in Springfield, IL is seeking a full-time Special Education Teacher to develop and implement assessment-based IEP goals, objectives, and education routines that provide a functional age-appropriate curriculum for the students. The teacher will prepare lesson plans based up on the students’ IEP goals and objectives and shall provide educational instruction to students as well as guidance and direction to educational specialist. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Hope Learning Academy in Chicago is seeking a full-time Special Education Teacher to educate students with low-incidence disabilities. The Special Education Teacher will work closely with the general education and special education school team to teach students according to their Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) and help students develop to their full academic potential while systematically increasing their social and independent functioning skills. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher, Learning Disabilities - Provides and is accountable for the planning, assessment, instruction, communication, human relations, safety, and management of a classroom or assigned instructional setting. Supports FCPS mission to "inspire, enable, and empower students to meet high academic standards, lead ethical lives, and demonstrate responsible citizenship." To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher, Multiple Disabilities ES/MS/HS - Provides and is accountable for the planning, assessment, instruction, communication, human relations, safety, and management of a classroom or assigned instructional setting. Supports FCPS mission to "inspire, enable, and empower students to meet high academic standards, lead ethical lives, and demonstrate responsible citizenship." To learn more- Click here

* [2022-2023] Reading Intervention Specialist - Like all DREAM employees, the Intervention Specialist should demonstrate a strong commitment to the mission and values of DREAM and should have substantial expertise in all areas of responsibility. Candidates must also value DREAM's comprehensive approach to education and desire to make a lasting impact in underserved communities as part of a growing organization. To learn more- Click here

* [2022-2023] ELL Teacher - Reporting to the Academic Dean, the ELL Teacher will be responsible for designing and leading ELL instruction, and collaborating with school staff to provide English language support. This is an exciting opportunity for a dynamic educator who is passionate about improving student outcomes for all students, and eager to apply their vision for rigorous, whole-child education in a growing, collaborative school community. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher Preschool - Provides and is accountable for the planning, assessment, instruction, communication, human relations, safety, and management of a classroom or assigned instructional setting. Supports FCPS mission to "inspire, enable, and empower students to meet high academic standards, lead ethical lives, and demonstrate responsible citizenship." To learn more- Click here

* [2022-2023] Middle School ELA Learning Specialist - Reporting to the Academic Dean, the Middle School Social Studies Teacher will be responsible for building meaningful relationships with students, implementing a Common Core-aligned curriculum, and working with their grade team to analyze data to drive instruction. This is an exciting opportunity for an educator who is passionate about improving student outcomes by leading excellent instruction and building a positive school culture. To learn more- Click here

* [Immediate Hire] Middle School Math Learning Specialist - Reporting to the Academic Dean, the Middle School Math Learning Specialist will be responsible for building meaningful relationships with students, implementing a Common Core-aligned curriculum, and working with their grade team to analyze data to drive instruction. This is an exciting opportunity for an educator who is passionate about improving student outcomes by leading excellent instruction and building a positive school culture. To learn more- Click here

* Tenure Track Faculty - School of Education (Special Education) - We value the ability to serve students from a broad range of cultural heritages, socioeconomic backgrounds, genders, ability and orientations. Therefore, we prioritize applicants who demonstrate they understand the benefits diversity brings to a professional educational community. The successful candidate will be an equity-minded individual committed to collaborating with faculty, classified staff, administration, and students who are also committed to closing equity gaps. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher-(Elementary, Middle, or High School) - The EC Teacher plans and provides for appropriate learning experiences for students with disabilities in a variety of educational settings. To learn more- Click here

* Student Learning Support (SLS) Teacher (Immediate Opening) - Rochambeau is committed to a diverse workforce representative of our students, one that embraces cultural competency and an international community. Diversity is the hallmark of Rochambeau, with over 80 nationalities represented in the student body. We are dedicated to fostering a culture where diversity, equity, and inclusion remain at the core of who we are. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education - Elementary Teacher - Career opportunities where you can choose your path. From coaching to administration, there are many options to grow your career, while pursuing your interests and passions. We are hiring immediately for a full-time Special Education - Elementary Teacher. Come grow your career with the Clark County School District! To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher and Paraprofessional Positions – District Wide - The purpose of these positions is to help each student learn subject matter and skills that will contribute to his/her development as a mature, capable, and responsible adult. Provide a positive, healthy, and safe environment in which the student can achieve his/her maximum potential. To learn more- Click here

If you are an Employer looking for excellent special education staff - Click here for more information


FOOD FOR THOUGHT

A kind gesture can reach a wound that only compassion can heal. Steve Maraboli

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