Week in Review - October 21, 2022


 

NASET

WEEK IN REVIEW

National Association of Special Education Teachers

October 21, 2022                 Vol 18 Issue #42


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Dear NASET Members and Guests,

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW.  Here, we provide you with the latest publications fromNASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW at news@naset.org. Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,

 

WHATS NEW AT NASET

NASET’s Early Intervention Series

Using Visual Supports for Young Children

This issue of NASET’s Early Intervention series is a product of the National Center for Pyramid Model Innovations and was made possible by Cooperative Agreement #H326B170003 which is funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Program. Visual supports can help children learn new skills and prevent challenging behavior. Visuals help young children learn and follow routines by helping them understand what is happening “now” and what is going to happen “next.” Visuals serve as reminders for verbal directions and help children know exactly what is expected of them. Using a visual schedule at home provides young children with predictability (i.e., they know what activity or routine is coming and when) and consistency (i.e., the schedule of activities or routines is the same).

Read More


NASET ADVOCACY - Board Certification for Advocacy in Special Education (BCASE)


How Are Kids with Disabilities Doing Post-COVID? Shamefully, We Still Don’t Know

Since the start of the pandemic, we at the Center on Reinventing Public Education have had our eyes locked on the experiences of and outcomes for students with disabilities. As we noted in our inaugural State of the American Student report, students with disabilities lost out on critical therapies and foundational learning and socialization opportunities during the early days of the pandemic. Nearly half (44%) of parents of students with cognitive disabilities reported that schools abandoned their child’s legal right to access an equitable education when they moved to remote learning, according to Understood, a national nonprofit that supports those who think and learn differently. Read More

Leading Dyslexia Treatment Isn’t a Magic Bullet, Studies Find, While Other Options Show Promise

In 2019, a grassroots campaign led by parents succeeded in passing a wave of dyslexia legislation. Many states mandated hallmarks of the Orton-Gillingham method, specifically calling for “multisensory” instruction, to help students with dyslexia read and write better.*  In New York, where I live, the city spends upwards of $300 million a year in taxpayer funds on private school tuition for children with disabilities. Much of it goes to pay for private schools that specialize in Orton-Gillingham instruction and similar approaches, which families insist are necessary to teach their children with dyslexia to read. But two recent academic papers, synthesizing dozens of reading studies, are raising questions about the effectiveness of these expensive education policies. Read More

Can Music and Rhythm Help the Development of Babies with Autism?

Children with autism enjoy the predictable rhythm of song, so adding it to social interactions can help development, according to a Vanderbilt University researcher presenting at Hartford HealthCare’s Institute of Living. Miriam Lense, PhD, offered “Rhythm, Timing and Song in Early Social Development in Autism: Mechanisms and Clinical Implications,” exploring her research into how rhythm and song facilitate communication for children and babies with autism. “Coordinated social interaction is built on predictable, rhythmic behavior and speech,” she explained. “In infants, infant-caregiver interaction is built on rhythmic entrainment. Infants pay attention to meaningful social information such as the caregiver’s eyes, and this promotes development.” Read More

 

New Apprenticeship Program Aims to Recruit Special Education Teachers

A new apprenticeship program aims to recruit more high school students into teaching special education, and state leaders want it to be a model for new opportunities in other schools. The program has launched at Noblesville High School. Under the five-year program, juniors and seniors will take classes through Ball State University and get experience working with students, according to Carrie Lively, executive director of The Pursuit Institute of Hamilton County, which helped start the program. It’s the nation’s first federally-registered apprenticeship program in special education, according to the Indiana Department of Education. Read More


 


Why Did American Kids Stop Walking to School?

“Back in my day, we walked to school uphill, both ways…in the snow!” It’s a familiar pronouncement from senior citizens eager to illustrate the bleakness of their childhoods, and it’s one that younger generations have learned to take with a grain of salt. After all, older generations have been calling today’s kids “soft” (and criticizing the circulation of “participation trophies”) for over 100 years. Give it a rest, Grandpa Abe. But elevation change and precipitation aside, older Americans did indeed walk to school more consistently than today’s young Americans. The data backs up the trite claims. In 1969, half of American children between the ages of 5 and 14 walked or biked to school. But in 2011, just 13% of that demographic was walking or biking to school, and according to the latest reports from the National Household Travel Survey, that number is now down to 11%. Read More

ADHD Drugs Negatively Affect Bone Density

A recent study investigated the effect of psychostimulants modafinil, atomoxetine, and guanfacine on the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to osteoblasts and on their cell functions, including migration. Researchers determined that the 3 medications commonly used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) negatively affect hMSC differentiation to bone-forming osteoblasts and cell migration through different intracellular pathways. With an increasing number of children and adolescents receiving a diagnosis of ADHD, and 60% of children continuously affected by ADHD into adulthood, the potentially high number of patients with controlled or uncontrolled use of psychostimulants increases the impact of possible adverse effects. Previous research has shown that the early ADHD drug methylphenidate, another cognitive enhancer inhibiting the DAT and NET system, influences bone metabolism negatively by causing a growth reduction of 1.38 cm/year and decreasing the mineral density of bone tissue. Read More

 

‘We’re on Our Own.’ How People with Disabilities are Left Out of Climate Planning

When the inevitable hurricanes threaten New Orleans, it’s hard for India Scott to figure where to go. In the city where she was born and raised, she’s stayed in hotels, relief shelters and, during Hurricane Katrina, in the famously overcrowded Superdome. But it is always a gamble choosing where to seek refuge. A lot of places that are safe for most people aren’t safe for her because they aren’t accessible to people like her, people living with disabilities. Scott has used a wheelchair her entire life; she was born with a disability. Even when the weather is calm in New Orleans she is reluctant to leave home to visit friends or go out to shop or eat, because places outside her house can’t guarantee that she’ll be able to maneuver even basic things like using the restroom, passing through an entryway or getting into bed. Read More

 

Human Cells in a Rat's Brain Could Shed Light on Autism and Other Conditions

Scientists have demonstrated a new way to study conditions like autism spectrum disorder, ADHD, and schizophrenia. The approach involves transplanting a cluster of living human brain cells from a dish in the lab to the brain of a newborn rat, a team from Stanford University reports in the journal Nature. The cluster, known as a brain organoid, then continues to develop in ways that mimic a human brain and may allow scientists to see what goes wrong in a range of neuropsychiatric disorders. "It's definitely a step forward," says Paola Arlotta, a prominent brain organoid researcher at Harvard University who was not involved in the study. "The ultimate goal of this work is to begin to understand features of complex diseases like schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorder, bipolar disorder." Read More

 



TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Congratulations to: Gabriella Young, Wanda J. Routier, Bonnie Baldwin, Karina Snider, Zenaida Lemus, Lynne Shields, Caroline Capasso, Patsy Ray, Rachel Krueger, Lisa Keller, Susan Avery, Lauro Esquilona III, Phoebe Liakopoulou, Tracey Christilles, Karen Frantz-Fry, Diane Campbell-Mitchell, Suzanne Davenport, and Rebekah Budziszews who all knew the answer to last week's trivia question:

According to an analysis by WalletHub, a personal finance website, this U.S. city is the best city in the U.S. for people with disabilities. To identify the best and worst cities for people with disabilities, analysts compared 182 U.S. cities, including the 150 most populated cities, on 34 metrics of disability-friendliness, ranging from graduation rate for students with disabilities to wheelchair-accessible grocery stores per capita. Each of the metrics fell into one of the following categories: quality of life, healthcare or economy. Based on Wallethub’s analysis of data, which U.S. city was found to be the best city in the U.S. for people with disabilities?

Answer: MINNEAPOLIS, MN

This week's trivia question: As defined under the federal law, IDEIA, what is the term that is defined as “any item, piece of equipment or product system, whether acquired commercially off the shelf, modified, or customized, that is used to increase, maintain, or improve the functional capabilities of children with disabilities”?

If you know the answer to this week's trivia questions, email it to us at contactus@naset.org by October 25, 2022. If you are correct, you will be acknowledged in next week's NASET's Week in Review


Struggling Early Readers Can Catch Up Over Time; Let's Figure Out How

Arecent EdSource podcast asks: “Why do so many students struggle to learn to read?” An equally essential question is: Why were so many struggling readers improving before the pandemic? The possibility that reading has improved after third grade runs counter to conventional wisdom. Jill Barshay of the Hechinger Report writes “America’s reading scores were dropping before the pandemic.” Natalie Wexler, in The Atlantic, said, “students haven’t gotten better at reading in 20 years.” These views are accurate when we compare the achievement of one year’s fourth grade students to a previous year’s fourth graders. But when we follow the same groups of students over time as they move through school, a much different story of steady progress emerges. Read More

Study: $190B in ESSER Funds ‘Insufficient’ to Curb Learning Loss

Researchers estimate $325 billion to $930 billion is needed to offset the learning loss effects caused by remote learning during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study published in the journal Educational Researcher, a publication of the American Educational Research Association. Those estimates, the study said, show the historic near-$190 billion allocated from the federal Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief funds is “insufficient to mitigate declines in student achievement” due to the pandemic. The study’s co-authors, Kenneth Shores at the University of Delaware and Matthew Steinberg at George Mason University, found allocating ESSER dollars through preexisting funding channels, like Title I, provided unequal aid to districts with the same needs. Consequently, the researchers wrote that districts with similar student poverty levels received very different amounts of federal aid. Read More

Study: Why Early Autism Diagnosis Is Key to Intervention Success

New research from The University of Texas at Dallas shows that an intervention developed in Texas for young children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder leads to significantly improved social communication skills only when delivered before the third birthday, underscoring the need for early diagnosis. The findings, published May 21 in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, evaluated Pathways Early Autism Intervention compared to community services in 67 culturally diverse children diagnosed with autism. Pathways coaches caregivers to follow the child’s lead, use wait time, limit distractions and demands, and engage in face-to-face positioning, mutual gaze, animation and imitation. The use of mutual gaze — which begins to falter between ages 2 months and 6 months in autistic infants — distinguishes the Pathways program from other methods. Pathways focuses on mutual gaze because it is an essential component of early interaction in infants with typical development that may activate the social brain network. Read More

 

 



SCOTUS Case Could Change Special Education Dispute Resolution, Settlement Processes

The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear an Individuals with Disabilities Education Act case that could impact how parents of students with disabilities and their public school districts approach the dispute resolution and settlement process. In Perez v. Sturgis Public Schools, judges will consider whether individuals who have entered into a settlement resolving their IDEA claims must further exhaust the IDEA’s administrative process before filing a lawsuit under the Americans with Disabilities Act. The case also addresses whether the requirement to exhaust IDEA’s administrative remedies before filing suit under IDEA applies to an Americans with Disabilities Act suit seeking only money damages that are not available under IDEA. Read More

Districts Struggle with Social Media Verification, Reporting Cyberbullying

With social media verification a potential tool for handling cyberbullying, a new survey finds a quarter of school districts applying for verification were rejected in the last two years. Online bullying remains a concern for districts, with 59% of respondents saying they have dealt with social media postings that harass, intimidate or bully their students,  according to the survey of 292 K-12 leaders from the National School Public Relations Association and the Consortium of School Networking. Talks to address concerns over verification and online bullying began over the summer between CoSN and NSPRA staff and social media companies including Facebook, LinkedIn, SnapChat, TikTok, Twitter and YouTube. Twitter said it is working to create a process to allow federally recognized K-12 institutions to verify their official social media accounts, according to NSPRA. Read More

 

How the Pandemic Changed Education for Students with Disabilities & Accommodations

Mario McMinn’s eyes start to burn by hour five of staring at screens. He’s a high school sophomore who isn't blind but has a visual impairment. When he and everyone else were forced to learn from home in 2020, it meant his whole day was looking at his iPad and computer. “That was a struggle for me," he said, "because then when school was over and then it's time to actually do the homework that was assigned, which was also digital, my eyes were kind of fried at that point. I'd have a headache and I couldn't focus.” His vision teacher got him a tool that helped during remote learning and that he still uses today when he’s back in-person at school. It was a magnifying glass with a backlight around the size of a flashlight. In some classes, his vision doesn’t affect him at all. But in, say, his computer science class, the magnifying glass is great for limiting strain to his eyes. Read More

Work-Based Learning in High School

As a special educator, I have one goal in mind: to help students gain the skills and knowledge necessary to be as independent and fulfilled as possible in their adult lives. After teaching at the middle school level for over a decade, I decided to make the leap to high school and to specialize in work-based learning in order to help facilitate lifelong success for my students. Work-based learning is the intersection of project-based learning and social and emotional learning, as it invites students to work on real-world tasks that will facilitate their ability to obtain employment. The social and emotional learning component? Developing the soft skills, or interpersonal skills, necessary to thrive at work. Read More

 



JOB POSTINGS

* [2022-2023] Middle School Learning Specialist - Reporting to the Academic Dean, the Learning Specialist will be responsible for providing tailored support to students with special education needs, through integrated co-teaching, in small group settings, or a combination of both. This is an exciting opportunity for a seasoned educator who is passionate about ensuring all students succeed and thrive in school. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teachers $50/hr -Maxim Healthcare Staffing is looking to hire a Special Education Teacher provide quality services to special education students, kindergarten through grade 12, through a commitment to team participation in planning and implementation of student programs including special instruction, tutorial assistance and consultation with general education staff. To learn more- Click here

* [2022-2023] Reading Intervention Specialist - Like all DREAM employees, the Intervention Specialist should demonstrate a strong commitment to the mission and values of DREAM and should have substantial expertise in all areas of responsibility. Candidates must also value DREAM's comprehensive approach to education and desire to make a lasting impact in underserved communities as part of a growing organization. To learn more- Click here

* [2022-2023] Middle School ELA Learning Specialist - Reporting to the Academic Dean, the Middle School Social Studies Teacher will be responsible for building meaningful relationships with students, implementing a Common Core-aligned curriculum, and working with their grade team to analyze data to drive instruction. This is an exciting opportunity for an educator who is passionate about improving student outcomes by leading excellent instruction and building a positive school culture. To learn more- Click here

* Teacher of the Deaf/Special Educator - Early Intervention - The Early Intervention preschool classroom teacher is a Teacher of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, though candidates with Early Childhood Special Education certification will be considered, who works with students ages three to five in a classroom setting and is responsible for planning and leading all aspects of the daily learning environment. To learn more- Click here

* [2022-2023] ELL Teacher - Reporting to the Academic Dean, the ELL Teacher will be responsible for designing and leading ELL instruction, and collaborating with school staff to provide English language support. This is an exciting opportunity for a dynamic educator who is passionate about improving student outcomes for all students, and eager to apply their vision for rigorous, whole-child education in a growing, collaborative school community. To learn more - Click here

* Teacher - Virtual - Interested in teaching online courses? You can work full time or part time for supplemental income. Set your own hours, work from your own home, and earn your equivalent teaching salary or more! To learn more- Click here

* [2022-2023] Middle School ELA Learning Specialist - Reporting to the Academic Dean, the Middle School Social Studies Teacher will be responsible for building meaningful relationships with students, implementing a Common Core-aligned curriculum, and working with their grade team to analyze data to drive instruction. This is an exciting opportunity for an educator who is passionate about improving student outcomes by leading excellent instruction and building a positive school culture. To learn more- Click here

* [Immediate Hire] Middle School Math Learning Specialist - Reporting to the Academic Dean, the Middle School Math Learning Specialist will be responsible for building meaningful relationships with students, implementing a Common Core-aligned curriculum, and working with their grade team to analyze data to drive instruction. This is an exciting opportunity for an educator who is passionate about improving student outcomes by leading excellent instruction and building a positive school culture. To learn more- Click here

* [2022-2023] Middle School Learning Specialist - Reporting to the Academic Dean, the Learning Specialist will be responsible for providing tailored support to students with special education needs, through integrated co-teaching, in small group settings, or a combination of both. This is an exciting opportunity for a seasoned educator who is passionate about ensuring all students succeed and thrive in school. To learn more- Click here

* School Principal - We strive to give our clients support, resources, and the ability to heal through the work of animal-assisted therapy and nature-based learning all while developing the skills and confidence to grow into independent young adults. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher, Learning Disabilities - Provides and is accountable for the planning, assessment, instruction, communication, human relations, safety, and management of a classroom or assigned instructional setting.  Supports FCPS mission to "inspire, enable, and empower students to meet high academic standards, lead ethical lives, and demonstrate responsible citizenship." To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher, Multiple Disabilities ES/MS/HS - Provides and is accountable for the planning, assessment, instruction, communication, human relations, safety, and management of a classroom or assigned instructional setting. Supports FCPS mission to "inspire, enable, and empower students to meet high academic standards, lead ethical lives, and demonstrate responsible citizenship." To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher Preschool - Provides and is accountable for the planning, assessment, instruction, communication, human relations, safety, and management of a classroom or assigned instructional setting. Supports FCPS mission to "inspire, enable, and empower students to meet high academic standards, lead ethical lives, and demonstrate responsible citizenship." To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher-(Elementary, Middle, or High School) - The EC Teacher plans and provides for appropriate learning experiences for students with disabilities in a variety of educational settings. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education - Elementary Teacher - Career opportunities where you can choose your path. From coaching to administration, there are many options to grow your career, while pursuing your interests and passions. We are hiring immediately for a full-time  Special Education - Elementary Teacher. Come grow your career with the Clark County School District! To learn more- Click here

If you are an Employer looking for excellent special education staff - Click here for more information


FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Reliability is the fuel for compounding strength of a leader. Loss of reliability results in loss of confidence in one's leadership. 

Krishna Saagar Rao

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