Week in Review - October 14, 2022


 

NASET

WEEK IN REVIEW

National Association of Special Education Teachers

October 14, 2022                 Vol 18 Issue #41


Continuing_Ed


Dear NASET Members and Guests,

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW.  Here, we provide you with the latest publications fromNASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW at news@naset.org. Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,

 

WHATS NEW AT NASET

JAASEP - Fall 2022

Table of Contents

JAASEP Editorial Board of Reviewers

A Case Study of Compounding Views of Paraprofessional Roles and Relationships in Preschool Classrooms: Implications for Practice and Policy

TIARA SAUFLEY BROWN AND TINA STANTON-CHAPMAN

Video Modeling to Support Physical Activity in Children with  Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Review

JOANN P. JUDGE, KRISTEN N. MORGAN, AND ANGELA CLIFTON

Practicing Teachers’ Use of Online Tools for IEP Goal Writing and Instructional Support

MICHAEL DUNN AND MARY RICE

Special Education in Rural Mexico: Two Schools in Jalisco

ALEJANDRA FAVELA AND PHYLLIS PETTEYS

Pre-service Teachers’ Attitudes Toward Including Students with ASD in General Education

MARY A. HOUSER, TARA S. GUERRIERO, DAVID L. BOLTON, AND ESTHER SMIDT

A Competency-Based Education Case Study: A Mathematics Intervention for a Five-Year-Old with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

MEIRAV TZOHAR-ROZEN, YAEL KIMHI, AND DALIA COHEN

Lessons from the Trenches: Special Education Service Delivery and Instruction Amidst the COVID-19 Health Crisis in California Schools

NICOLE NICHOLSON

Choosing a Career Path: Moving Beyond the Challenges of Autism Spectrum Disorder

VICKY G. SPENCER, AND S. LYNN CESARD

Preview-View-Review: Increasing Academic Access for Students with Severe Disabilities who are English Learners

DOLORES WILLIAMSON, TRACY SPIES, KYLE HIGGINS, AND SHANNON SPARKS

Beating the Odds: How Six Post-Secondary Learners Overcame Common Challenges of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

MARTHA L. WISE, BARBARA L. WISE, AND SARAH JONES

Author Guidelines for Submission to JAASEP

Copyright and Reprint Rights of JAASEP

Read More


NASET ADVOCACY - Board Certification for Advocacy in Special Education (BCASE)


3 Ways Technology Can Help Schools Address the Mental Health Crisis

We have a mental health crisis in our schools. If you talk to any teacher, administrator, or guidance counselor, you will undoubtedly hear stories about students struggling to cope with everything from significant trauma to their day-to-day responsibilities. Across the board, depression and drug use are on the rise, while academic progress and development are in decline. Collectively, 70% of public schools report a rise in students seeking support services. In response, two-thirds of schools have increased and diversified their mental health services. Half are providing extra training to teachers that better equip them to support students’ social, emotional, and mental health. After consecutive pandemic years, this school year is an opportunity to help students return to holistic wellness, putting them on a path to success for years to come. But no single entity or institution can achieve this cornerstone outcome alone. Read More

 

Autism: Building a Better Drug

Laura Cancedda didn’t set out to develop a drug for autism traits. In fact, Cancedda, senior group leader of the Brain Development and Disease Laboratory at the Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia in Genoa, Italy, had never studied autism at all when she realized her research on how developing neurons maintain inhibitory signaling might point toward new medicines. But it wasn’t until she met researcher Marco De Vivo in 2015 that the idea came into focus. Together, they decided to test whether dialing down inhibitory brain activity by modulating chloride ion transport can treat the repetitive behaviors and social challenges that are associated with autism. Read More

Study of Adults with ADHD Links Childhood Clumsiness to a Higher Likelihood of Being Bullied

New research published in the Journal of Psychiatric Research adds to evidence suggesting that children who are clumsy are more likely to be victims of bullying. The study, conducted among an ADHD sample, found that adults who said they performed poorly in physical education class as children were more likely to say they were bullied by peers. Psychology research has unearthed various risk factors for being victimized in school. These characteristics tend to share a common theme — being different than other kids. For example, children with physical disabilities or mental disorders are more likely to be targets of bullying. Study author Susanne Bejerot and her research team note that these risk factors often coexist. For example, children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often present with motor coordination difficulties, which is commonly described as clumsiness. And both ADHD and clumsiness have been associated with a higher likelihood of being bullied. Read More

 

A Sustainable Plan for Meeting Learners Where They Are

Differentiated instruction in schools can be as straightforward or as complex as we make it. We do have a tendency, however, to overcomplicate it. We convince ourselves that the more individualized instruction is, the more personalized it will be. This results in unsustainable practices for personalizing learning, such as planning concurrent lessons for leveled groups or even playlists that are hard to maintain over the course of the school year. My experience with these unsustainable practices while working for a personalized learning company in Silicon Valley led me back to the tried-and-true practices for meeting learners where they are. Not only are these best practices, but they are sustainable. Teachers can use these without spending nights and weekends planning and assessing learning. Read More

 


 


33% of Public School Children Were Chronically Absent After Classrooms Re-Opened

A national group that seeks to curb student absenteeism is sounding an alarm after finding that the number of chronically absent students continued to surge even as pandemic closings abated. The organization, Attendance Works, believes that the number of students missing at least 18 days* of school a year doubled to 16 million in 2021-22 from 8 million students before the pandemic. If correct, this means that one out of every three public school children was chronically absent during the second full school year of the pandemic, when most children were learning in person and should have been catching up from the disrupted year of 2020 and the first half of 2021. Before the pandemic, only about 16 percent of U.S. school children were chronically absentRead More

Rate of Childhood Vision Screening Decreased Substantially Between 2016 and 2020

Vision screening is a vital part of pediatric care both because of the impact of visual function on day-to-day life and the high potential for intervention for many causes of decreased vision, such as refractive error and amblyopia. This study aimed to use the National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) to assess trends in childhood vision screening and vision care. Based on about 175,000 survey responses, the prevalence of vision screening decreased significantly, from 69.6% in 2016 to 60.1% in 2020. The percentage of screenings performed by a vision specialist also decreased significantly, from 55.6% to 50.4%. There was no statistically significant change in rates of reported blindness or trouble seeing while wearing glasses. Between 2019 and 2020, reported unmet needs for vision care increased significantly from 0.5% to 1.1%, indicating a likely impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Read More

How are Districts Embracing Character Education to Counter Bullying?

In California’s Stockton Unified School District, character building is an everyday focus as students and teachers are provided monthly themes to explore around traits like empathy or kindness, with related activities woven into curricula. October, for example, is the month for respect. And with a tie-in to National Bullying Prevention Month, students and educators talk about developing respect for themselves and others, and how that supports anti-bullying efforts. To Jordan Blevins, school counselor for Stockton Unified’s K-8 schools, these monthly themes create a singular message: that every student is valued within the school community and outside their school’s walls, too. Read More

Concussions Linked to Poor Academic Standing Among Adolescents

High school students who had a history of concussion may be more likely to face poor academic standing than those without concussions. The association was stronger in those with a history of repeated concussions (RR = 1.5; 95% CI 1.26-1.78). The findings were not consistent across all demographics; the researchers found racial and ethnic disparities.

A study published in Injury Prevention revealed that adolescents with a history of concussion had a 25% greater risk for being in poor academic standing than those without a concussion history. Researchers reported that the risk increased for those who had repeated concussions. Read More

Personalities Don't Usually Change Quickly But They May Have During the Pandemic

The global coronavirus pandemic disrupted almost everything about our lives, from how we work and go to school, to how we socialize (Zoom happy hours, anyone?!), and ultimately strained trust in many of the overarching systems we depend on, from health care to government. New research suggests it may have changed Americans' personalities, too, and not for the better. Typically, major personality traits remain fairly stable throughout life, with most change happening in young adulthood or when stressful personal life events occur. It's rare to see population-wide personality shifts, even after stressful events, but in a new study in the journal PLOS One, psychologists found just that in the wake of the pandemic. Read More



TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Congratulations to: Latorrya Buie, Bonnie Baldwin, Sarah McCarthy, Cynthia Turcotte, Teresa Wendelburg, Lauro Esquilona III, Karen Frantz-Fry, Patsy Ray, Joanna Blau, Diane Campbell-Mitchell, Katrina Snider, and Zenaida Lemus who all knew the answer to last week's trivia question:

According to recent research in the field, there is a growing U.S. shortage of a prescription drug taken to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. More than six in 10 small pharmacies reported having difficulty in August obtaining the medication, based on a survey from the National Community Pharmacists Association. Quotas on how much of this medication can be made is also affecting its supply. What is this commonly prescribed ADHD medication?

Answer: ADDERALL

This week's trivia question: According to an analysis by WalletHub, a personal finance website, this U.S. city is the best city in the U.S. for people with disabilities. To identify the best and worst cities for people with disabilities, analysts compared 182 U.S. cities, including the 150 most populated cities, on 34 metrics of disability-friendliness, ranging from graduation rate for students with disabilities to wheelchair-accessible grocery stores per capita. Each of the metrics fell into one of the following categories: quality of life, healthcare or economy. Based on Wallethub’s analysis of data, which U.S. city was found to be the best city in the U.S. for people with disabilities?

If you know the answer to this week's trivia questions, email it to us at contactus@naset.org by October 18, 2022. If you are correct, you will be acknowledged in next week's NASET's Week in Review


Solving Math Through Conversation Leads to Better Understanding

Math conferences between teachers and students can help broaden their understanding of a new concept as they work through problems. Allowing students time to ask questions or hear responses from their peers provides an active learning opportunity that can help strengthen their grasp of mathematics. These conversations can start as early as elementary school and continue through middle and high school. “When teachers are able to talk to students and have them make their thinking visible, they can then support that student to engage more deeply in mathematics, support their making connections, and help them build on their learning,” said Trena Wilkerson, president of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. Read More


Despite the ADA, Patients with Disabilities Not Getting Equal Medical Care

The 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act and subsequent ADA Amendments Act of 2008 mandated equal access to health care access to people with disabilities. But a new study finds many doctors still either unable or unwilling to provide the same level of care to patients with disabilities as those without. The authors gathered data for the study by conducting focus groups with primary care doctors in both rural and non-rural practices and with specialists in a variety of areas. Interviewers asked them about the challenges they faced in caring for patients with mobility, hearing, vision, mental health, and intellectual disabilities. The physicians were also asked about their knowledge and application of the ADA. Participants identified five general barriers to providing care for patients with disabilities. Read More

Vaping, Cannabis Use Increasing Among U.S. Teens

The increasing use of cannabis and vaping among U.S. adolescents may be associated with how teens spend their time, according to a study published in Substance Use & Misuse. Specifically, several factors, such as social engagement, participation in structured activities, level of adult supervision and paid employment, correlated with substance use overall. Using data from 536,291 adolescents in the Monitoring the Future Study gathered through annual, nationally-representative surveys from 1991 to 2019, Noah T. Kreski, MPH, data analyst for Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, and colleagues analyzed trends in use of cigarettes, alcohol, cannabis, other substances and vaping of nicotine for those in grades eight, 10 and 12. They then categorized respondents into six groups based on amounts of social time, level of engagement in organized activities, paid employment and, for those with high social time and high engagement, whether activities were more supervised, such as sports, or less supervised, such as dating or parties. Read More

 



Kids with Disabilities Face Off-the-Books School Suspensions

The phone call from her son’s school was alarming. The assistant principal told her to come to the school immediately. But when Lisa Manwell arrived at Pioneer Middle School in Plymouth, Michigan, her son wasn’t sick or injured. He was sitting calmly in the principal’s office. John, who has ADHD and finds it soothing to fidget during class, had been removed from the classroom after he refused to stop using a pair of safety scissors to cut his cuticles. When she asked why he couldn’t stay for the rest of the day, Manwell said the school told her they would call child protective services if she didn’t take him home. Read More

 

Fact Check: Are Flexible Student Deadlines at Odds With Real Life?

One Sunday evening last spring, I opened my work email to see a request from a student: He was very sorry, but he had underestimated how much work he needed to do for an important oral presentation. Could he receive an extension? Teachers are familiar with these emails that arrive the day—or night—before a project is due. I considered writing back that the deadline had been set a month ago and that since we’d met to discuss his plan already, he should just do his best. But the student, Alex (a pseudonym), had been sick the prior week with Covid-19 and had missed work in all classes. Alex also noted that he had worked through multiple revisions of the presentation, but he felt stuck. His request could be seen as an example of honest self-assessment and critical reflection. Read More

New Research Could Change Our Understanding of Autism

There is a widespread belief that autistic people are poor at recognizing the emotions of others and have little insight into how effectively they do so. However, a recent Australian study has demonstrated that individuals with autism are just slightly less accurate than their non-autistic peers at recognizing facial expressions of emotion. Recent research shows we may need to reevaluate widely held beliefs that adults with autism experience difficulties with social emotion recognition and have little insight into their processing of other people’s facial expressions. The findings were recently published in the journal Autism Research. Read More



JOB POSTINGS

* Teacher - Virtual - Interested in teaching online courses? You can work full time or part time for supplemental income. Set your own hours, work from your own home, and earn your equivalent teaching salary or more! To learn more- Click here

* [2022-2023] Middle School ELA Learning Specialist - Reporting to the Academic Dean, the Middle School Social Studies Teacher will be responsible for building meaningful relationships with students, implementing a Common Core-aligned curriculum, and working with their grade team to analyze data to drive instruction. This is an exciting opportunity for an educator who is passionate about improving student outcomes by leading excellent instruction and building a positive school culture. To leanr more- Click here

* [Immediate Hire] Middle School Math Learning Specialist - Reporting to the Academic Dean, the Middle School Math Learning Specialist will be responsible for building meaningful relationships with students, implementing a Common Core-aligned curriculum, and working with their grade team to analyze data to drive instruction. This is an exciting opportunity for an educator who is passionate about improving student outcomes by leading excellent instruction and building a positive school culture. To learn more- Click here

* [2022-2023] Middle School Learning Specialist - Reporting to the Academic Dean, the Learning Specialist will be responsible for providing tailored support to students with special education needs, through integrated co-teaching, in small group settings, or a combination of both. This is an exciting opportunity for a seasoned educator who is passionate about ensuring all students succeed and thrive in school. To learn more- Click here

* School Principal - We strive to give our clients support, resources, and the ability to heal through the work of animal-assisted therapy and nature-based learning all while developing the skills and confidence to grow into independent young adults. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher (Sign on Bonus) - The Special Education Teacher works closely with all members of the dedicated, inter-disciplinary therapeutic team supporting the students and classroom. Teachers also collaborate with parents and guardians to ensure the greatest wrap around services, school -to-home communications, and understanding of the student. Collaboration with our partnering school districts is also essential. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Hope Learning Academy in Springfield, IL is seeking a full-time Special Education Teacher to develop and implement assessment-based IEP goals, objectives, and education routines that provide a functional age-appropriate curriculum for the students. The teacher will prepare lesson plans based up on the students’ IEP goals and objectives and shall provide educational instruction to students as well as guidance and direction to educational specialist. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Hope Learning Academy in Chicago is seeking a full-time Special Education Teacher to educate students with low-incidence disabilities. The Special Education Teacher will work closely with the general education and special education school team to teach students according to their Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) and help students develop to their full academic potential while systematically increasing their social and independent functioning skills. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher, Learning Disabilities - Provides and is accountable for the planning, assessment, instruction, communication, human relations, safety, and management of a classroom or assigned instructional setting. Supports FCPS mission to "inspire, enable, and empower students to meet high academic standards, lead ethical lives, and demonstrate responsible citizenship." To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher, Multiple Disabilities ES/MS/HS - Provides and is accountable for the planning, assessment, instruction, communication, human relations, safety, and management of a classroom or assigned instructional setting. Supports FCPS mission to "inspire, enable, and empower students to meet high academic standards, lead ethical lives, and demonstrate responsible citizenship." To learn more- Click here

* [2022-2023] Reading Intervention Specialist - Like all DREAM employees, the Intervention Specialist should demonstrate a strong commitment to the mission and values of DREAM and should have substantial expertise in all areas of responsibility. Candidates must also value DREAM's comprehensive approach to education and desire to make a lasting impact in underserved communities as part of a growing organization. To learn more- Click here

* [2022-2023] ELL Teacher - Reporting to the Academic Dean, the ELL Teacher will be responsible for designing and leading ELL instruction, and collaborating with school staff to provide English language support. This is an exciting opportunity for a dynamic educator who is passionate about improving student outcomes for all students, and eager to apply their vision for rigorous, whole-child education in a growing, collaborative school community. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher Preschool - Provides and is accountable for the planning, assessment, instruction, communication, human relations, safety, and management of a classroom or assigned instructional setting. Supports FCPS mission to "inspire, enable, and empower students to meet high academic standards, lead ethical lives, and demonstrate responsible citizenship." To learn more- Click here

* [2022-2023] Middle School ELA Learning Specialist - Reporting to the Academic Dean, the Middle School Social Studies Teacher will be responsible for building meaningful relationships with students, implementing a Common Core-aligned curriculum, and working with their grade team to analyze data to drive instruction. This is an exciting opportunity for an educator who is passionate about improving student outcomes by leading excellent instruction and building a positive school culture. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher-(Elementary, Middle, or High School) - The EC Teacher plans and provides for appropriate learning experiences for students with disabilities in a variety of educational settings. To learn more- Click here

* Student Learning Support (SLS) Teacher (Immediate Opening) - Rochambeau is committed to a diverse workforce representative of our students, one that embraces cultural competency and an international community. Diversity is the hallmark of Rochambeau, with over 80 nationalities represented in the student body. We are dedicated to fostering a culture where diversity, equity, and inclusion remain at the core of who we are. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education - Elementary Teacher - Career opportunities where you can choose your path. From coaching to administration, there are many options to grow your career, while pursuing your interests and passions. We are hiring immediately for a full-time Special Education - Elementary Teacher. Come grow your career with the Clark County School District! To learn more- Click here

If you are an Employer looking for excellent special education staff - Click here for more information


FOOD FOR THOUGHT

I'm a success today because I had a friend who believed in me and I didn't have the heart to let him down. Abraham Lincoln

Return to Week in Review Main Page - Click here

lost password?