Week in Review - June 17, 2022

 


 

NASET

WEEK IN REVIEW

National Association of Special Education Teachers

June 17, 2022                 Vol 18 Issue #24


Continuing_Ed


Dear NASET Members and Guests,

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW.  Here, we provide you with the latest publications fromNASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW at news@naset.org. Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,

WHATS NEW AT NASET

JAASEP SPRING/SUMMER 2022

Table of Contents

JAASEP Editorial Board of Reviewers

Examining General Education and Special Education Teacher Preparedness for Co-Teaching Students with Disabilities

Cindy Causey, Lina Soares, Catherine S. Howerter, and Peggy Shannon-Baker

“I’m not Prepared”: Experiences of Professionals Working with Students with Disabilities and Co-occurring Mental Health Disorders

Megan Fujita, Grace L. Francis, and Jodi Duke

I-CARE: A Scaffolded Instructional Approach to Teach Teachers and Staff Self-Care Practices within Juvenile Justice Facilities

Sara Sanders, Skip Kumm, Brandis M. Ansley, and Kristine Jolivette

Increasing Pre-service Special Education Teacher Skills on Performance Feedback

Tosha L. Owens, Melissa E. Hudson, and Karen S. Voytecki

Using Video Self-Monitoring to Improve Teacher Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Selena J. Layden, Annemarie L. Horn, and Kera E. Hayden

Understanding How Individuals Overcome Their Dyslexia: Struggles, Turning Points in Life, and Advice

Nai Cheng Kuo, Karin M. Fisher, Jennifer Jones, Sara Hillis, I-Chien Chen, and Keonna Stanley

Special Educators’ Perceptions of High-Leverage Practices

Cynthia Ann Farley and Rhonda S. Black

Paraeducators: An Important Member of Educational Team for Students with Disabilities

Sarah N. Douglas, Ryan P. Bowles, and Rebecca Kammes, Ph.D.

Individualized Rating Scales of Engagement during Group Exercise Activities for Children with Multiple and Severe Disabilities: A Process Description and Case Series

Eydie Kendall, Karren Streagle, and Tania Helbert

Transforming the Narrative Identity of a Student with Extensive Support Needs Using Multiliteracies

Sudha Krishnan

Author Guidelines for Submission to JAASEP

Copyright and Reprint Rights of JAASEP

Read More


NASET ADVOCACY - Board Certification for Advocacy in Special Education (BCASE)


Designing Effective Systems to Support an Alternative High School

Our grade 9–12 alternative school is successful in no small part because it accepts a wide range of students. We are not solely a credit recovery program, nor do we take only students who would have otherwise been expelled from school. We welcome students from a special education background, who have attendance and behavioral issues, who need to add space to their schedules, who have credit deficiency, who are teen parents, who have a background of trauma, or who have a need or motivation to graduate early. This mix of students contributes to our strength. It raises the bar for all, helps students develop empathy, and dilutes the off-task and disruptive behaviors of previously recalcitrant students. We’ve developed effective systems to make our school successful. Read More

 

Performance Tasks or Projects? Complementary Approaches for Student Engagement

The terms “performance tasks” and “projects,” in the context of project-based learning (PBL), are familiar to today’s educators. Like fraternal siblings, they share many common qualities, yet they are not identical twins. Eight key dimensions can help underscore the differences and similarities between performance tasks and projects, so educators know how to use each of them appropriately. We believe that shorter, more structured performance tasks can naturally serve as stepping stones to more comprehensive project-based learning. In essence, a performance task asks students to apply their learning in some fashion. More specifically, a performance task is “any learning activity or assessment that asks students to construct a multi-faceted response, create a product, or produce a demonstration”. In project-based learning, a “project” is a more in-depth learning experience—referring to the whole process, not just the final product. A project provides the motivation, the framework, and the actions required to complete the learning. Read More

As Universal School Meals Program Nears End, President Biden Eyes Other Ways to Get Food to School Kids

Biden officials are working on a smaller effort to help schools buy select food products as the universal free school meals program Congress authorized during the Covid-19 pandemic approaches its expiration date, according to two people familiar with the plans. Administration officials are exploring using about $1 billion from an Agriculture Department fund to help schools purchase U.S. commodities for their meal programs. USDA did something similar last December, as districts struggled to find consistent sources of food amid ongoing supply chain disruptions from the pandemic. A USDA official not authorized to speak publicly on the matter confirmed the department intends to deploy the funds later this month, but final arrangements are still underway. Read More

 

Teens are Facing a Sleep Deprivation Epidemic. Here's why

American teenagers aren't getting enough sleep these days, and author Lisa L. Lewis refuses to snooze on the issue anymore. Lewis, a mother of two, helped spark the first law in the nation requiring healthy school start times for adolescents — a law that will be put into action in California later this summer. Lewis shared why sleep is so important for teenagers, how much sleep teens should be getting, and why they need to sleep more than adults. She touches on all the factors that can negatively affect teen sleep: technology, gender, sexual identity and socioeconomic status, to name a few. Read More

 


 


Willpower and ADHD

“Why is it that people with ADHD can do some specific things that they happen to be really interested in, or where they feel like, if they don’t take care of this right here, right now, something they do not want to see happen is going to happen fast?” Thomas E. Brown, PhD, of the Brown Clinic for ADHD and Related Disorders and the University of California-Riverside School of Medicine shared with 2022 American Psychiatric Association (APA) Annual Meeting attendees that attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may appear to be a problem of motivation, or “willpower,” but it is not. “The central mystery about ADHD is the situational variability of the symptoms…” Brown said. “Every patient I’ve ever seen with ADHD has a few activities in which they have no difficulty utilizing their executive functions, but has a lot of difficulty with doing almost everything else. It comes down to that one phrase: if I’m interested.” Read More

Preventing Adverse Birth Outcomes Could Boost Education, Income

Reducing the excess prevalence of low birthweight, preterm birth or small-for-gestational-age birth in low- and middle-income countries may lead to substantial long-term human capital gains when it comes to both long-term schooling and lifetime income gains, according to a new study published this week in the open-access journal PLOS Global Public Health by Mia Blakstad of Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, U.S.A., and colleagues. Globally, it is estimated that 14.6% of all live births are low birthweight, 10.6% are preterm and 27.0% are small-for-gestational-age. While the global contribution of adverse birth outcomes to child morbidity and mortality is well documented, the potential long-term schooling and economic consequences have been less well studied. Read More

First-Ever Elucidation of a Small Protein's Structure Could Signal Help for Those with Epilepsy and Other Disorders

Scientists have, for the first time, revealed at the atomic level the structure of a protein that carries one of the body's most important neurotransmitters into neurons. In determining the structure of this transporter protein -- one of the smallest proteins ever resolved -- the researchers open new avenues to improve drugs for a wide range of debilitating conditions, including epilepsy, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, anxiety and autism spectrum disorder. The study appears June 8 in the journal Nature. Neurons relay signals to one another by sending neurotransmitters across gaps between them, called synapses. The molecule GABA (short for gamma-amino butyric acid) is one of the most prevalent neurotransmitters in the brain. Read More

Whole-Body Learning Can Boost Children's Letter Sound Recognition -- The First Step Toward Reading

Children who move while learning sounds of letters significantly improve their ability to recognize individual letter sounds. This is the conclusion of a new study conducted by the University of Copenhagen's Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports and Denmark's National Centre for Reading, in collaboration with 10 Copenhagen area school classes. Reading is a complex and crucial skill that impacts the ability of youth to perform as students, across social contexts and in their eventual working lives. Therefore, it is important to develop reading skills during childhood. Now, a team of researchers from the University of Copenhagen and Denmark's National Centre for Reading has focused on whether whole-body learning in instruction, known as embodied learning, has a positive impact on children's ability to learn letter sounds. Read More

 



TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Congratulations to: Carrie Ferguson, Lauro Esquilona, Karen Frantz-Fry, Tracey Christilles, Lynne Shields, Joanna Blau, Margaret Kullenberg, Cynthia Turcotte, Patsy Ray, Diane Campbell-Mitchell, Katrina Snider, and Zenaida Lemus who all knew the answer to last week's trivia question:

There may be another way of treating a child’s attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms than using just medication — and that’s by giving them a more nutritious diet. Researchers from The Ohio State University say children with ADHD who consume more of these types of foods see a significant drop in their levels of inattention. In a study of 134 kids displaying ADHD symptoms, those eating these types of foods were three times more likely to see an improvement in their ability to pay attention and regulate their emotions — compared to children taking a placebo. What are the foods?

Answer: FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

This week's trivia question: In people with this inherited disorder, phenylalanine builds up in the blood and then crosses into the brain, where it is toxic and causes damage. The reason people with the disorder can't break down phenylalanine is that they have a problem with an enzyme called phenylalanine hydroxylase. PAH breaks down phenylalanine into another amino acid called tyrosine. Since phenylalanine is found in many foods, such as chicken, meat, eggs, dairy, nuts, grains, and legumes, the main way to treat it is to eat a special diet that limits foods containing phenylalanine. What is the name (or 3 letter abbreviation) for this disorder?

If you know the answer to this week's trivia questions, email it to us at contactus@naset.org by June 21, 2022. If you are correct, you will be acknowledged in next week's NASET's Week in Review


Study Finds Infertility is a Modest Risk Factor for the Development of ADHD in Childhood

In a recent study published in Human Reproduction, researchers evaluated the risk of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in offspring of infertile mothers or those receiving infertility treatment compared to offspring of mothers with unaided conception. Studies investigating the long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes in offspring of mothers with infertility and/or receiving infertility treatment are limited. Previous studies have shown increased risks of behavioral, cognitive, and emotional impairments post-exposure to infertility treatment. However, studies evaluating the association between infertility treatment and ADHD have shown inconsistent results, and the causes of such associations are unclear. Read More

 

ADHD Update: Diagnosis, Assessment, and Treatment Issues

The prevalence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in the worldwide pediatric population has been stable over the past 30 years except in the United States, where cases have increased. According to a 2016 parent survey, approximately 6.1 million US children (9.4%) had received a diagnosis of ADHD. Worldwide, ADHD is the third most common mental health disorder, following depression and anxiety. Overall, girls (5.6%) are less likely to be diagnosed with ADHD than boys (12.9%).  A 2021 global systematic review and meta-analysis suggested that the prevalence of persistent adult ADHD was 2.58% and the prevalence of symptomatic adult ADHD was 6.76%, with 139.84 million and 366.33 million affected adults worldwide in 2020, respectively.4 ADHD appears to impact men more than women. In adults, ADHD appears to decrease as an individual ages. Read More

 

Research Suggests Autism Increases Risk for COVID Complications

New research indicates autistic people are at higher risk of developing complications from COVID-19. A Vermont doctor says she’s witnessing the pattern firsthand. Dr. Melissa Houser opened her nonprofit a little less than a year ago in the middle of the pandemic in Montpelier. Her practice prioritizes inclusive health care for patients whose brains function differently than what’s considered “typical.” That includes people with autism. She says she treats so many people with invisible disabilities, she has a unique perspective that supports this new research. Of Houser’s 175 patients, about 120 identify as neurodivergent. She says about 80% of that group are presenting with long COVID-like symptoms: tiredness, shortness of breath and chest pain, to name a few. “We have over 100 people who are really suffering,” Houser said. Autism, ADHD and dyslexia are all neurodivergencies. Read More



Lehigh University Special Education Law Symposium

Lehigh University’s virtual Special Education Law Symposium returns from June 19-24. Sessions recorded for later viewing. Twenty-eight experienced special education attorneys from across the country will present eight new “hot topics” from the very latest case law: dyslexia legal update, stay put permutations, liability for abuse of students with disabilities, navigating compensatory services and compensatory education, settlement strategies, and more with a focus upon COVID-19 implications. Legally Basic and Legally Experienced tracks. The Section 504 Coordinators Institute is an overlapping, but separable two-day (June 23-24) component intended for school district Section 504 coordinators and others interested in this increasingly important anti-discrimination statute. Dr. Perry Zirkel (PA) and Jose Martin (TX) will respectively offer (a) an in-depth comparison of Section 504 and the IDEA and (b) legal nuances for IDEA-eligible students who also present unique Section 504 factors. Kathleen Sullivan (CO) and Judith Nedell (CT) offer a full day of practical solutions to basic and thorny 504 challenges. Week-long and per day symposium options available. Balance of school and parent viewpoints. For more information, see go.lehigh.edu/spedlaw, or call (610) 758-5557. Read More


Sticking Around: Most Dig Districts Will Offer Virtual Learning this Fall, a Sign of Pandemic’s Effect

All kinds of applications have come Monica Morris’ way as she prepares to open the Dallas school district’s first standalone virtual school this fall. Some applicants are students who have been homeschooled or enrolled in a temporary online program. Others struggled this year after returning to in-person class. A handful have serious medical needs. All are hoping to attend iLearn Virtual Academy next year, which will enroll  up to 350 students in third through eighth grades.“We have seen a lot of interest,” said Morris, the school’s principal. “This isn’t just a pandemic response mode of learning anymore.” Read More

 

Flow State vs. Hyperfocus: On Channeling Unsteady ADHD Attention

Are there any differences between being hyperfocused and being in a flow state? Yes! A hyperfocused ADHD brain is completely absorbed in its task — to the point of seemingly ignoring or tuning out everything else. Some people describe hyperfocus as a dream-like state wherein the outside world ceases to exist. A child in hyperfocus  may become too engrossed in a video game to hear his parents call his name. An adult in hyperfocus may be reading a book so intently that they lose track of time and miss an appointment. Some neurotypical people may occasionally experience a hyperfocus-like state. However, it occurs more often in people with conditions that reflect attention issues, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Read More 

Cardona Urges Support for Educators as Rocky Year Comes to a Close

The nation’s education secretary said it’s time to boost teacher pay and add new kinds of support for educators struggling after two and a half pandemic school years. “We need to prioritize education, not just when schools are closing, but when they’re open, and we need to level up and raise the bar,” said Miguel Cardona in a speech Thursday. “I’m using the bully pulpit to say, the last few years I’ve been fearing and fighting COVID. The next two years, I’m going to be fearing and fighting complacency.” Cardona spoke to an audience of educators in New York City, where he pushed his vision for “supporting and uplifting” teachers in the midst of “enormous challenges.” He called for action, saying increasing teacher salaries is key to increasing retention. Read More



JOB POSTINGS

* Chief of Adult Services, Aspire Living & Learning - Reporting to the Chief Executive Officer, the Chief of Adult Services will serve on the eight-person Executive team that provides leadership across the entire organization. In this capacity, the CAS will play an integral role in informing, creating, and executing the strategic direction of Aspire. The CAS will directly manage five staff members, four of whom oversee program operations in an Aspire state (CT, MA, MD, NH) and one of whom oversees facilities. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher (Sign on Bonus) - The Special Education Teacher works closely with all members of the dedicated, inter-disciplinary therapeutic team supporting the students and classroom. Teachers also collaborate with parents and guardians to ensure the greatest wrap around services, school -to-home communications, and understanding of the student. Collaboration with our partnering school districts is also essential. To learn more- Click here

* Physical Education Teacher (Sign on Bonus) - The Physical Education Teacher works closely with all members of the dedicated, inter-disciplinary therapeutic team supporting the students and classroom. This teacher also collaborates with parents and guardians to ensure the greatest wrap around services, school -to-home communications, and understanding of the student. Collaboration with our partnering school districts is also essential. To learn more- Click here

* Teacher's Aide I (Sign on Bonus) - The purpose of this position is to provide support and performs duties as assigned under the direct supervision of the classroom teacher(s) and by the general direction of the Principal or Assistant Principal. To learn more- Click here

*Special Education Teacher - The Special Education Teacher will teach at one of our Network campuses. The Special Education Teacher will be responsible for planning lessons and curricula, administering assessments, collecting and analyzing data, and relentlessly supporting students to achieve academic excellence. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Guides the learning process toward the achievement of IEP goals, establishes clear objectives for all lessons, units, and projects, and is able to communicate effectively with students, staff, and parents as supervised by the building principal. To learn more- Click here

* [2022-2023] High School Learning Specialist - Reporting to the Academic Dean, the High School Learning Specialist will be responsible for building meaningful relationships with students, implementing a Common Core-aligned curriculum, and working with their grade team to analyze data to drive instruction. This is an exciting opportunity for an educator who is passionate about improving student outcomes by leading excellent instruction and building a positive school culture. To learn more- Click here

* Special Ed Intellectual Disabilities Teacher, ES, MS, HS - Provides and is accountable for the planning, assessment, instruction, communication, human relations, safety, and management of a classroom or assigned instructional setting. Supports FCPS mission to "inspire, enable, and empower students to meet high academic standards, lead ethical lives, and demonstrate responsible citizenship." To learn more- Click here

* Special Ed Learning Disabilities Teacher, ES, MS, HS - Provides and is accountable for the planning, assessment, instruction, communication, human relations, safety, and management of a classroom or assigned instructional setting. Supports FCPS mission to "inspire, enable, and empower students to meet high academic standards, lead ethical lives, and demonstrate responsible citizenship." To learn more- Click here

* Special Ed Multiple Disabilities Teacher, ES, MS, HS - Provides and is accountable for the planning, assessment, instruction, communication, human relations, safety, and management of a classroom or assigned instructional setting. Supports FCPS mission to "inspire, enable, and empower students to meet high academic standards, lead ethical lives, and demonstrate responsible citizenship." To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Autism - Responsible for planning, implementing, and evaluating instructional activities for special education students. Create a flexible class environment favorable to learning and personal growth; establish effective rapport with students; motivate students to develop skills, attitudes, and knowledge in accordance with each student’s ability; and establish good relationships with parents and other staff members. To learn more- Click here

* Middle School Special Education (Directed Studies) Language Arts Teacher - The Upper School Special Education (Directed Studies) Language Arts Teacher is given the duty of instructing students on such a level as to allow them to obtain proficiency in their subject levels at a grade-appropriate level. To learn more- Click here

* Rockstar Elementary Trained Special Education Teacher - Our school works as a team. If you are looking for a job where you can fulfill your passion for working with students with learning differences, we would like to hear from you. As one of the few schools in Oregon devoted to students with learning differences and the only one focused exclusively on middle school, Bridges offers its 5th through 8th grade students small class sizes, differentiated instruction, and a safe place to learn and grow. To learn more- Click here

* Educational Specialist - Environmental Charter Schools is seeking a talented and dynamic Educational Specialist with a Moderate/Severe credential who is passionate about ensuring educational equity for students with exceptionalities. This position provides the opportunity to partner with special education and general education teachers across three campuses in order to prepare low-income students of color with exceptionalities for college success. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher - We are recruiting for three Special Education Teachers to serve Quest Academy Day Treatment Center in Longview, WA for the 2022-2023 school year. These positions are full time, 192 day contracts. To learn more- Click here

* The SEED Public Charter School of Washington DC: Multiple Positions - SEED DC is looking for its new cohort of intentional, proactive, and enthusiastic teachers in Washington, D.C. As a SEED DC teacher, you’ll teach SEED DC’s curriculum in dynamic, participation-oriented classes and cultivate a learning environment that supports and encourages students to develop and realize their academic potential. You’ll also collaborate with other instructional staff, school personnel, and SEED DC’s senior leadership team to help advance SEED’s mission of supporting scholars to and through college completion. To learn more- Click here

* Coordinator, Life and Career Studies - Residential Program for Students with Intellectual Disabilities - Lakeland University seeks a mission-oriented individual passionate about creating a more inclusive world to develop and coordinate an innovative program for students with intellectual disability slated to open on its Sheboygan campus in Fall 2023. This four-year residential program is designed to prepare students for meaningful employment, as well as independent and community living. The coordinator will play an important leadership role in designing the program as well as overseeing its implementation. To learn more- Click here

* Strategist II: ID Teacher - Join Ames Community School District, where your journey matters! ACSD promotes an educational environment that is racially, ethnically, linguistically, and culturally diverse to broaden students' academic experience and to enrich our District. We are focused on creating and supporting diversity, equity, and inclusion within the organizational culture and in our community. To learn more- Click here

* Integrated Services Teacher - Join Ames Community School District, where your journey matters! ACSD promotes an educational environment that is racially, ethnically, linguistically, and culturally diverse to broaden students' academic experience and to enrich our District. We are focused on creating and supporting diversity, equity, and inclusion within the organizational culture and in our community. To learn more- Click here

* Strategist I Teacher - Join Ames Community School District, where your journey matters! ACSD promotes an educational environment that is racially, ethnically, linguistically, and culturally diverse to broaden students' academic experience and to enrich our District. We are focused on creating and supporting diversity, equity, and inclusion within the organizational culture and in our community. To learn more- Click here

* Behavior Interventionist - Join Ames Community School District, where your journey matters! ACSD promotes an educational environment that is racially, ethnically, linguistically, and culturally diverse to broaden students' academic experience and to enrich our District. We are focused on creating and supporting diversity, equity, and inclusion within the organizational culture and in our community. To learn more- Click here

If you are an Employer looking for excellent special education staff - Click here for more information


FOOD FOR THOUGHT

For every minute you are angry you lose sixty seconds of happiness.

Ralph Waldo Emerson

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