Week in Review - February 18, 2022


NASET

WEEK IN REVIEW

National Association of Special Education Teachers

February 18, 2022                 Vol 18 Issue #7



Dear NASET Members and Guests,

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW.  Here, we provide you with the latest publications fromNASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW at news@naset.org. Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,


WHATS NEW AT NASET

NASET’s Practical Teacher

How Rhyming and Rappin’ Can Improve Reading and Writing: Improving Poetic Intelligence

Matthew Glavach, Ph.D.

This issue of NASET’s Practical Teacher was written by Matthew Glavach, Ph.D. When most people hear the word Rappin’, they often associate it with negative language and feelings. It doesn’t have to be. Rapping can be uplifting and searching for a rhyme for rapping, for a song, or for poetry can ignite the imagination in unexpected directions. Developing poetic intelligence can open new patterns of thought. As students practice building their own rhymes, they are developing a greater understanding for words. Middle school and high school struggling readers consider most books at their level baby-work and are embarrassed by them. Often, these students respond to rhyme and developing rhymes for their song and poetry ideas. The article describes how to improve reading and writing skills, and poetic intelligence while teaching rhyming for rapping, song, or poetry development.  

To Access this article - Click Here


NASET ADVOCACY - Board Certification for Advocacy in Special Education (BCASE)


NYC's School Bus Staffing Shortages Hurt Students with Special Needs, Advocates Say

School busing problems continue to be exacerbated by the pandemic this school year, some New York City parents say, pointing to staff shortages and confusion over routes and schedules. While shortages of drivers and staffers to work on yellow school buses were an issue long before the pandemic, problems have mounted in the past two years as hybrid learning has complicated schedules and low pay caused employees to leave, said Sara Catalinotto, founder of the Parents to Improve School Transportation advocacy group at a virtual rally Friday. The group has launched a campaign to improve bus services, increase bus driver pay and implement better pandemic control measures, with a planned march on City Hall next month. Read More

Proposal Would Require Nebraska Students Be Screened for Autism Before Enrolling in School

Like any new father, Scott Schafer counted his newborn son's fingers and toes, and made sure the baby could see and hear. What Schafer didn't anticipate was the obsessions his son would develop, or the struggles he would have with fine motor skills, and the eventual behaviors that would create friction at school. "Autism was not on my radar screen," Schafer told the Legislature's Education Committee on Tuesday. It took several more years until Schafer's son was diagnosed with the developmental disorder, he said. In that time, the relationship between parents and child, and the family and the school began to fray. "We're trying to catch up, but I ask what if we would have caught this sooner?" Schafer said. Read More

Could an ADHD Coach Help Families?

According to the American Psychiatric Association, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affects an estimated 8.4 percent of children and 2.5 percent of adults. Families living with ADHD can sometimes feel overwhelmed, disorganized, and out of sorts, especially when it comes to the day-to-day operations of life. And whether you have one child with ADHD or three, coming up with a system that works for everyone is no easy feat.  That’s why some families are looking for outside resources. You may have heard about ADHD coaches. These coaches advertise that they can help with strategies and tools that address organization, time management, goal-setting, and other skills needed to carry out practical activities of daily life. Read More

 



Writing Reference Letters for People with Disabilities

Reference letter–writing season is upon us, and you may be wondering how to approach writing about the disabilities of students and colleagues you are recommending. Letters of reference are critical components of admissions, hiring and promotion. But because letter readers tend to read between the lines, even just mentioning a disability can be a red flag, as Amy Vidali, associate professor at the University of Colorado at Denver, has noted. As a part-deaf full professor who has navigated her entire career with a disability, I’ve been on all sides of the desk. I’ve been the mentee cringing at the misrepresentation of my disability, I’ve been the mentor wondering how to frame my mentee’s skills in the best light and I’ve been the letter reader assessing strengths and weaknesses. Here, I offer some suggestions. Read More

Unaccompanied Migrant Teens Have Unique and Profound Needs. One New Orleans Teacher Created a Special School to Help Them

Julie Norman is leading a conversation about goal-setting with a class of high school students. As she speaks, she writes relevant terms in English on a whiteboard. “Motivation,” she narrates, marker in hand. After copying down the word, the teens look it up in the Spanish-English dictionaries that sit on every desk. Motivación. These kids know something about the topic. Most fled violence in Central America. Many traveled alone, on foot, to the United States, some with hopes of joining a parent they haven’t seen for years. The names of the places they came from decorate the wall. Belen, Olancho, Yoro, San Pedro Sula, Puebla, Roatan, Tela, San SalvadorRead More

In Canada, Critical but Costly ADHD treatments Cause Many Parents Unexpected Financial Strain

As the parent of three children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Shannon Low is familiar with its psychological, emotional and financial toll. “They’re overwhelmed each and every day,” says the Calgary-based pharmacist, whose children range in age from 16 to 21. Despite being gifted learners, the neurodevelopmental disorder means they struggle with an inability to focus, difficulties with planning and organizing, and hyperactivity. Like most parents, Ms. Low has strived to get her kids the help they need. She spent $1,800 for each child’s psychoeducational assessment, which are conducted by psychologists to determine whether a child has attention deficit disorder, ADHD, or learning disabilities. Read More

No Assurance Neediest Schools Will Get Help They Need in More than 40 States

Nearly 20 states earned a “red light” warning for a lack of clarity on how their COVID-relief spending plans will help the highest need students and schools, according to a new analysis. A majority of states “are essentially abdicating their role” by failing to set benchmarks for equity in the distribution of ESSER funds to districts, says “Driving Toward Equity,” a new report from Education Reform Now, a nonprofit advocacy organization. In a dozen states—Alabama, California, Florida, Illinois, Louisiana, Maryland, Minnesota, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wyoming—officials have made no plans to track district equity spending or whether the funds are supporting the students most impacted by the pandemic, the report says. Read More

 

 



TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Congratulations to: Cass Azevedo, Diane Campbell-Mitchell, Olga Stavro, Cindi Maurice, Stephanie Jenkins, Elizabeth Ciccarelli-Ross, Cassandra Jones, Gray Cohen, Wanda Routier, Angela Bruecks, Lauro Esquilona, Margaret Mernah, Karen Frantz-Fry, Jenifer Womble-Ericson, Zenaida Lemus, Susan Mason, Bridget Richardson, and Megan Nehez who all knew the answer to last week's trivia question:

In 1901, the city of Worcester, Massachusetts organized what was considered the first American public school for certain types children. Students from other schools in the area were pulled in to attend. What “exceptional children” were brought in to the first school of its kind in 1901 in Worcester, Massachusetts?

Answer: GIFTED STUDENTS

THE TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK WILL RETURN ON FEBRUARY 25, 2022


How to Get the Whole Class Engaged in Rich Conversations

My high school students are eager to discuss issues such as food deserts, homeless encampments, teen vaping, immigration, and criminal justice reform. However, a traditional Socratic model presented two problems: Quiet students were left out of the conversation, and the overly prescriptive nature of the questions left the discussion feeling stilted. By weaving together two facilitation models, I designed a full-class inquiry that gives students agency when discussing a current issue and facilitates a meaningful dialogue. Conversations with this model are lively, engaging, and dynamic. Here’s how it works. Read More

Anorexia Before or During Pregnancy Linked to Having a Child with Autism

Women with anorexia nervosa before or during pregnancy have an increased chance of having a child with autism or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, according to a new study. About 20 percent of people with anorexia — an eating disorder marked by food restrictions, low body weight and an intense fear of weight gain — are autistic, but estimates vary. Prior work has suggested that anorexia and autism could share genetic roots, but many studies have looked at the connection only in people actively seeking treatment for an eating disorder, making it hard to control for confounding factors such as medication use. Read More

Educators Across North Dakota Share How to Improve Special Education

Conference attendees focused on making sure students in special education receive a quality education and have as similar as possible learning experiences as their peers. “I have a daughter who has Down Syndrome, she used services from the time she was born all the way until she was done with public schools,” said President of the Bismarck/Mandan Council for Exceptional Children, Roxane Romanic. “There’s so much in special education, whether it’s paperwork, to high need students that require a lot of individual planning which takes time, and you have to think outside the box,“ said Mandan Public Schools Director of Alternative Education Carly Retterath. Thinking creatively includes ideas such as fulfilling the needs of academics, inclusion, socio-emotional behavior, and students requiring physical accommodation. Read More



Arkansas Changing High School Graduation Requirements for Students Receiving Special Education Services

The 2021-22 school year is the final year in which Arkansas students who receive special education services can graduate based on meeting the requirements of their individualized education programs. Beginning in 2022-23, there will be two paths to high school graduation for students who are eligible for special education services: Students with the most severe cognitive disabilities -- no more than 1% of all students -- can graduate based on an alternate pathway to graduation; All other students who receive special education services must have instruction in and complete the 22 courses that the state requires at a minimum for high school graduation. Matt Sewell, special education division manager for the Arkansas Division of Elementary and Secondary Schools, said in a recent interview that the shifts away from using an individualized education program as a student's graduation plan and from a reliance on resource room courses are required by federal laws -- the Every Student Succeeds Act and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Read More

Kids with Disabilities More Likely to Be Exposed to Violence, CDC Says

Traumatic events can affect any child’s health, raising their risk of certain diseases and negative outcomes later in life. A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests that one subset of kids is much more likely to go through stressful, sometimes health-endangering experiences: those with disabilities. These children were nearly twice as likely to have experienced the incarceration of a parent or guardian and more than three times as likely to have witnessed or experienced violence, the analysis shows. The study relied on data from the 2019 National Health Interview Survey and compared reports from a “knowledgeable adult, usually a parent,” of children with disabilities to those reported by the adults who care for children without disabilities. About 17 percent of children with disabilities were reported to have been a victim of or witnessed violence in their neighborhood, compared with 5.3 percent of their counterparts. Read More

Snow Skiing Clinic Opens Fun of the Sport to Kids with Disabilities

Children and adults with disabilities such as spinal cord and brain injuries got to experience the thrill of downhill skiing Saturday at Cannonsburg Ski Area in Belmont. The Cannonsburg Challenge Ski Association (CCSA), Mary Free Bed’s Wheelchair and Adaptive Sports and the city of Kentwood Parks and Recreation Department teamed up for the annual Adaptive Downhill Ski Clinic to show that skiing can be fun for everyone. “Skiing is one of those sports that can be difficult to get access to,” said Ann Przybysz, recreation program coordinator of Kentwood Parks and Recreation. “We do this downhill ski clinic every single year. It is a very fun day to get people of all abilities out on the hill skiing.” Read More

How Denver is Trying to Help Students' Mental Health, 20 Minutes at a Time

Eighth-grade teacher Amanda Winters keeps the main lights turned down in her room. Pink fabric covers the one fluorescent bulb in the ceiling that doesn't turn off, and a string of Christmas lights completes the illumination. Setting a calm and peaceful tone inside the classroom at the Denver Center for 21st Century Learning, a public school known as DC21, is important to her teaching, Winters told CNN, to help students grow emotionally as well as academically as the pandemic goes on. Getting students back to in-person school was critical, but so too is dealing with the baggage they bring from a year or more of being out of the classroom. Read More

High School Inclusivity Program Teaches Students with Special Needs Valuable Business Skills

Estelle Farias and her students are running a very profitable business at Tampa's Gaither High School. Chips, cookies, delicious drinks. Even homemade pillows and aprons. They sell it all to a loyal fanbase of teachers and kids. "We took our business and made it very, very huge," Farias said. Each of her coworkers, all of whom are teenagers with intellectual disabilities, has a job to do, whether it's sewing or accounting, selling or ordering new product. This is the 12 Plus Program, which prepares students with special needs, who have already graduated from high school, for future careers. Read More

 



JOB POSTINGS

* Director of Special Services - Establishes a safe, supportive, positive and productive learning and working environment. Provides leadership in planning, developing and implementing a comprehensive instructional program for special education; supervises all special programs for students with disabilities. Develops district procedures to coordinate the identification, evaluation and placement of students into programs for students with disabilities. To learn more- Click here

* [Summer 2022] Education Specialist - Elementary - Originally founded in 1991 as Harlem RBI, DREAM has grown to annually serve more than 2,500 youth across East Harlem and the South Bronx through a network of six PreK-12, extended-day, extended-year DREAM Charter Schools and community sports-based youth development programs. Through our commitment to rigorous academics, social-emotional learning, deep family and community engagement, and health and wellness, we create lifelong learners who are equipped to fulfill their vision of success in and out of the classroom. We dream big, as well, with an aggressive five-year plan to expand to serve 3,500 students across seven schools—growing our organization's impact and leveling the playing field for all children. To learn more- Click here

* Assistant Principal - DC Public Schools’ mission is to recruit, develop, and invest in a talented, caring, and diverse team. We know that when our educators are given the tools, opportunities, and recognition to thrive, our students will thrive in school and in life. RISE - Rigorous Instruction Supports Equity - is a new program to support educators through professional development, performance-based incentive awards, and support for new teachers at our highest-need schools. At its core, RISE is about honoring our educators as professionals and providing opportunities to learn and grow within the district. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher - The Knapp School staff members believe the best educational program for our students focuses on fostering each child’s academic and personal potential through assisting them in discovering and developing their strengths and passions while preparing them for success in the larger community. Our Special Education Teachers play a critical role in this process by prioritizing each students' development and growth through strong, supportive relationships and highly individualized academic and social emotional activities each day. To learn more - Click here

* Support Specialist - The purpose of this position is to assist in the establishment and maintenance of a safe environment for all students and staff within the school through close collaboration with School Teachers, Teacher’s Aides, Social Workers and School Administration. Must be able to enact principles of trained methodologies in order to provide emotional and environmental support for students throughout the school day. To learn more - Click here

* Executive Director, GROW Associates - GROW provides services for individuals with disabilities in the greater Brockton area to plan their individual goals and supports them in achieving those goals. GROW provides a wide range of services to almost 300 people. These programs include Day Habilitation, Community- Based Day Supports, Vocational Training and Employment Services. GROW Associates' services helps adults with developmental disabilities achieve a sense of accomplishment and self-worth. To learn more- Click here

* Principal - We work with Chicago Public Schools and with school districts from the Suburban Cook County, Lake County, and the Western Suburbs to serve students who are referred based on their need for a highly structured, therapeutic school setting and individualized approach to learning.  Students who are referred by a public school district are educated at Knapp School & Yeshiva at no cost to their families. In doing so we provide both academic and social and emotional supports that are aligned with each student’s specific strengths and needs. To learn more- Click here

* Senior Director of Program Operations Aspire Living & Learning - Aspire Living & Learning is a non-profit human services agency making a meaningful difference in the lives of neurodiverse adults and children. We provide residential programs, day support, special education, and employment services in partnership with families and in collaboration with public and private health, human service, education and other government agencies. Headquartered in Vermont, our 1,200 team members serve individuals across four Northeast and Mid-Atlantic states. To learn more- Click here

* Teach SPED 22-23 School Year - At New Visions for Public Schools, we work to make great public schools common in New York City. We believe that all of New York City’s students deserve public schools that make successful futures possible, especially Black, Latinx, and low-income students who have historically had inequitable access to a great public education. To learn more- Click here

* Strategist II: ID Teacher - Join Ames Community School District, where your journey matters! ACSD promotes an educational environment that is racially, ethnically, linguistically, and culturally diverse to broaden students' academic experience and to enrich our District. We are focused on creating and supporting diversity, equity, and inclusion within the organizational culture and in our community. To learn more- Click here

* Integrated Services Teacher - Join Ames Community School District, where your journey matters! ACSD promotes an educational environment that is racially, ethnically, linguistically, and culturally diverse to broaden students' academic experience and to enrich our District. We are focused on creating and supporting diversity, equity, and inclusion within the organizational culture and in our community. To learn more- Click here

* Strategist I Teacher - Join Ames Community School District, where your journey matters! ACSD promotes an educational environment that is racially, ethnically, linguistically, and culturally diverse to broaden students' academic experience and to enrich our District. We are focused on creating and supporting diversity, equity, and inclusion within the organizational culture and in our community. To learn more- Click here

* Behavior Interventionist - Join Ames Community School District, where your journey matters! ACSD promotes an educational environment that is racially, ethnically, linguistically, and culturally diverse to broaden students' academic experience and to enrich our District. We are focused on creating and supporting diversity, equity, and inclusion within the organizational culture and in our community. To learn more- Click here

* [2022-2023] 7th Grade Learning Specialist - Reporting to the Academic Dean, the Learning Specialist will be responsible for providing tailored support to students with special education needs, through integrated co-teaching, in small group settings, or a combination of both. This is an exciting opportunity for a seasoned educator who is passionate about ensuring all students succeed and thrive in school. To learn more- Click here

* [2022-2023] Middle School Learning Specialist - Reporting to the Academic Dean, the Learning Specialist will be responsible for providing tailored support to students with special education needs, through integrated co-teaching, in small group settings, or a combination of both. This is an exciting opportunity for a seasoned educator who is passionate about ensuring all students succeed and thrive in school. To learn more- Click here

* Executive Director, MARCH Inc. of Manchester (CT) - MARCH, Inc. of Manchester (MARCH) seeks a leader experienced in intellectual and developmental disabilities to position the organization for growth and sustainability by anticipating trends and changes in the developmental disabilities field in Connecticut. We are looking for an Executive Director skilled in external relations, partnership building, fundraising, and communications, balanced with being able to build its people and agency operations. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher, Institutional Settings - Dedicated and collaborative teams of educators committed to supporting teaching excellence through coaching, professional development and excellent administrative support. CES prides itself on providing robust and engaging learning opportunities to all its teachers. To learn more- Click here

* [Immediate Hire] High School Math Learning Specialist - Reporting to the Academic Dean, the High School Math Learning Specialist will be responsible for providing tailored support to students with special education needs, through integrated co-teaching, in small group settings, or a combination of both. This is an exciting opportunity for a seasoned educator who is passionate about ensuring all students succeed and thrive in school. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Do you aspire to help children with diverse challenges build skills for their future? Are you ready to make a real impact in their lives? As a Special Education Teacher at Bancroft, you will draw upon a wealth of curriculum and clinical resources to design individualized student goals. To learn more- Click here

* Director of Oregon Migrant Education Service Center - The Director position for the Oregon Migrant Education Service Center (OMESC) will provide leadership for the 3rd largest migrant education  program in the nation that includes nine education service districts and nine district regional program. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher (All Specializations) - 2022-23 School Year - DCPS serves approximately 49,000 students in the nation's capital through the efforts of approximately 4,200 educators in 117 schools. As part of a comprehensive reform effort to become the preeminent urban school system in America, DCPS intends to have the highest-performing, best paid (Salary Range: $56,313 - $90,905), most satisfied, and most honored educator force in the nation and a distinctive central office staff whose work supports and drives instructional excellence and significant achievement gains for DCPS students. To learn more- Click here

* Middle School Special Education Teacher - The Halton School, an independent school for students with Asperger’s, is looking for a Middle School Special Education teacher. The teacher will provide special education instruction to students in a small multi-grade class. The teacher will utilize a variety of teaching methods to meet student’s educational needs and adapt and develop instructional materials accordingly. To learn more- Click here

* Director of McKay Academic Center (Academic Support) - The Dunham School is a PK-12, non-denominational Christian, independent school serving 785 students on one campus. The school offers fee paid tutoring, coaching, small group instruction and individual courses for students with a range of learning challenges including ADD, ADHD, dyslexia, dysgraphia and high functioning autism. To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Teacher - STARS is owned and operated by Occupational Therapists. You will be an employee and receive full benefits. Summers off with year-round pay and year-round appreciation. With a proven track record, STARS is able to offer you an unbeatable support system and resources. STARS is hiring for the 2021-2022 and 2022-2023 school years. STARS places Special Education Teachers throughout the Phoenix, Tucson and the surrounding area public schools. To learn more- Click here

If you are an Employer looking for excellent special education staff - Click here for more information


FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Friends and good manners will carry you where money won't go.

Margaret Walker

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