Week in Review - February 11, 2022

Continuing_Ed


NASET

WEEK IN REVIEW

National Association of Special Education Teachers

February 11, 2022                 Vol 18 Issue #6



Dear NASET Members and Guests,

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW.  Here, we provide you with the latest publications fromNASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW at news@naset.org. Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,


WHATS NEW AT NASET

NASET’s Autism Spectrum Disorder series

Using Social Stories to Decrease Negative Behaviors in Students with Autism and Other Disabilities

Vivian C. Williams, Ed.D.

University of California Santa Barbara

This issue of NASET’s Autism Spectrum Disorder series comes from the Fall 2021 edition of the Journal of the American Academy of Special Education Professionals (JAASEP). It was written by Vivian Williams, Ed.D. from the University of California Santa Barbara. Social stories are effective interventions that can be used to manage negative behaviors and develop social skills.  However, contradictory results are suggested within the research because of variability in designing social stories, intervention phases, target behaviors, and treatment protocol.  Social story interventions may reduce negative behaviors among many children and adolescents with autism, other pervasive developmental disorders, and emotional and behavioral disabilities.  Many research studies focused on the implementation of social stories with children and adolescents who range from 3-15 years of age.  From these studies, social stories were found to be an effective intervention for increasing appropriate behaviors and decreasing challenging behaviors. This paper examines current research in the use of social stories’ intervention to reduce negative behaviors for students with autism and other disabilities.

To Access this article - Click Here


NASET ADVOCACY - Board Certification for Advocacy in Special Education (BCASE)


Amid a National Mental Health Crisis for Kids, Here's How Parents Can Help

School closures. Family strains. Isolated and quarantined friends. Even when young people haven't directly experienced COVID-19, the pandemic has strained their mental health. Often severely. Even before the recent wave of omicron-related cases, a coalition that included the American Academy of Pediatrics declared a national emergency in child and adolescent mental health. Its October statement reported "soaring rates of mental health challenges among children, adolescents and their families." In December, U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy addressed the crisis with a report that said young people face "devastating" mental health challenges. All of it may leave parents asking some important questions. Read More

Different Autism Risk Genes, Same Effects on Brain Development

Researchers have found that three different autism risk genes actually affect similar aspects of neuron development and the same neuron types, although each gene acted through unique molecular mechanisms. Additionally, a person's specific genomic background fine-tuned the genes' effects. The study was conducted using miniature 3D models, or 'organoids,' of the human cerebral cortex, the part of the brain responsible for cognition, perception, and language. The results advance our understanding of autism spectrum disorder and are a first step toward finding treatments for the condition. Read More

Educator’s View: 3 Tips for Transforming Students from Consumers of Education Technology into Creators

March will mark two years since schools had to switch to remote learning, district leaders frantically bought education tech products and teachers scrambled to make them work with their lesson plans. Today, as the Omicron variant spreads across the U.S., many schools have returned to online instruction, at least temporarily.  The result of this infusion of education technology is that it is now a permanent part of the K-12 instructional landscape, not only virtually but in the physical classroom. Some young learners, like the second- and third-graders I teach, have never known school to be anything other than tech-centered. Whether they’re at home or in an actual building, they turn on a laptop or tablet, log in to a content management system and start exploring instructional games, puzzles or videos. Every time I walk into a classroom, I’m reminded that COVID-19 has turned a generation of kids into full-fledged consumers of ed tech content. Read More



Stanford Team Finds Benefits to Online Autism Treatment

In the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, Stanford Medicine researchers had to pause a study of autism treatment in preschoolers. The participants, young children with speech delays, had been coming to Stanford 12 hours a week for a therapy called pivotal response treatment, which uses autistic children’s interests to motivate them to talk. The halt was stressful for kids and their families, said pediatric psychologist Grace Gengoux, PhD, the program’s clinical director. So instead of stopping the program altogether, Gengoux and her team tried offering the treatment online. To their surprise, it worked — well. There were even advantages to the telehealth approach that delivering the same treatment in person didn’t offer. “We were shocked at how effective it was,” Gengoux said. The team recently published a paper about their experiences in the journal Social Sciences. Read More

Military Kids Face Delays, Inequities in Getting Special Education Services

Military children with special education needs are facing significant delays in getting services they need, according to a new report based on a parent survey. The delays are systemic and parents are resigned to expecting those delays — findings which are no surprise to special needs families in general, said Jennifer Barnhill, chief operating officer and lead researcher for Partners in Promise, a nonprofit focused on protecting the rights of military children in special education. That organization, along with researchers at Ohio State University, conducted the fall 2021 survey of military and veteran parents of children with diagnosed disabilities. The overwhelming majority of the 1,156 people who responded were members of active duty families, including 238 active duty service members and 685 active duty spouses, Barnhill said. On average, parents said they wait 23 months between the time their child’s issue is first identified and the time their child receives special education services. Read More

UN: High Risk in Conflicts for Children with Disabilities

Children with disabilities often face increased risk of harm during armed conflict and crises, Human Rights Watch said today. The United Nations and governments around the world need to urgently ensure protection and assistance for children with disabilities in these circumstances. “Armed conflict takes a devastating toll on children with disabilities, yet governments and the UN have not done nearly enough to protect them,” said Jane Buchanan, deputy disability rights director at Human Rights Watch. “Governments, the UN Security Council, UN agencies, and aid groups should urgently step up efforts to protect and assist children with disabilities as part of their commitments toward children affected by hostilities.” Since 2015, Human Rights Watch has documented the impact of armed conflict and crises on children with disabilities in Afghanistan, Cameroon, the Central African Republic, the Gaza Strip in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, South Sudan, Syria, and Yemen. Read More



TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Congratulations to: Lauro Esquilona, Traci Bailey, Karen Frantz-Fry, Deborah Lindquist, Susan Mason, Katrina Snider, Karyn Swenor, Helma Wardenaar, and Cindi Maurice who all knew the answer to last week's trivia question:

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted ‘breakthrough device’ designation to a hair-based test designed to aid a specific diagnosis. The acknowledgment shifts the test into a fast lane through the agency’s regulatory review process. The test, called StrandDx, analyzes the levels of chemicals in a strand of a child’s hair to capture a snapshot of ‘exposome’ — some of the child’s cumulative environmental exposures and how the child regulates certain essential nutrients. The measures suggest how a person’s physiology responds to one’s environment, which can predict the chances of having what diagnosis?

Answer: AUTISM

This week's trivia question: In 1901, the city of Worcester, Massachusetts organized what was considered the first American public school for certain types children. Students from other schools in the area were pulled in to attend. What “exceptional children” were brought in to the first school of its kind in 1901 in Worcester, Massachusetts?

If you know the answer to this week's trivia questions, email it to us at contactus@naset.org by February 15, 2022. If you are correct, you will be acknowledged in next week's NASET's Week in Review


Report: New Mexico Students with Disabilities Less Likely to Graduate High School

On-time graduation rates for students with disabilities has been one of Justin Gosset's greatest concerns since he became Carlsbad Municipals School's director of special programs in 2017. While a recent report published by New Mexico Voices for Children found that a growing number of students in the state graduated high school within four years, students with disabilities lagged behind significantly. According to the 2021 New Mexico KIDS COUNT Data Book, 23% of high school students in the state did not graduate high school on time. But 34% for students with disabilities didn't reach graduation, either. In 2019 there were over 53,900 disabled students in the state according to the New Mexico Public Education Department. Read More

Disabilities Sometimes Go Undiagnosed in Homeless Students Targeted by New Federal Education Funds

The $800 million that the American Rescue Plan earmarked for homeless students is the largest such federal expenditure in a decade, with that money, thus far, paying for everything from student cellphones to educators’ overtime pay to hiring more special education staff. Nevertheless, as those dollars trickled out to school districts, what was still being determined is how much of the funding will go toward homeless students with disabilities and in what ways it will be spent. “As with any vulnerable population, [homeless students with disabilities] are exactly the people most likely to slip through the cracks,” said Michael Hickey, executive director for students in temporary housing at the New York City Department of Education. “The gold standard is that every one of those young people has access to somebody who is dedicated to being their navigation partner,” identifying and addressing their greatest challenges. Read More

Increasing Segregation of Latino Students Hinders Academic Performance and Could Amplify COVID Learning Loss

Elementary students from low-income families are less likely than they were two decades ago to attend schools with middle-class peers — a trend tied to the growth of the Latino population and continuing “white flight” from many school districts, a new study finds. Conducted by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Maryland, the analysis of over 14,000 districts nationwide shows that in 2000, the average child from a poor family went to an elementary school where almost half of the students were defined as middle class. By 2015, that figure had fallen to 36 percent. Read More

In Updated Guidance, American Academy of Pediatrics Says In-Person Learning Should Be Prioritized

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) urged that school districts prioritize in-person learning in an update to their interim pandemic guidance. “Two years into the pandemic, the American Academy of Pediatrics calls for renewed emphasis and support to keep schools open,” the AAP said in a statement announcing the updates. “In-school learning should be prioritized, with diligent adherence to safety measures such as vaccination, universal masking and physical distancing.” “The AAP observes that children have suffered in numerous ways during the COVID-19 pandemic, with a dramatic rise in mental health emergencies and deepening chasm of educational and health inequities experienced in under-resourced communities,” the AAP said in the new statement. Read More



What Does Trust Look Like in a School?

Trust matters—people who work in high-trust environments experience less stress, burnout, and sick days than those who work in low-trust environments. Higher levels of productivity, greater engagement, and more energy are all associated with these advantages. As a former teacher who now works with organizations to design professional learning, I hear a lot about teacher empowerment. We’ve seen countless instances where teachers or staff members do not feel supported or have the creative freedom to do what they believe is best in the classroom. Ultimately, they don’t feel trusted, and this lack of trust stifles engagement, increases stress, and leads to workplace dissatisfaction. If leaders want teachers to reach their full potential both inside and outside of the classroom, they must foster a culture of trust. Read More

Paternal Alcohol Use Increases Frequency of Fetal Development Issues

Prenatal visits have traditionally focused almost exclusively on the behavior of mothers, but new research from the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVMBS) continues to suggest that science should be looking more closely at the fathers' behavior as well. Dr. Michael Golding, an associate professor in the CVMBS' Department of Veterinary Physiology & Pharmacology (VTPP), has spent years investigating the father's role, specifically as it relates to drugs and alcohol, in fetal development. Golding says a number of publications have shown that males pass down more than just their genetics, but exactly how that process works and the consequences of it remain largely unknown. Read More

Screen Time Linked to Autism Spectrum Disorder in Boys

Screen time is significantly associated with autism spectrum disorder among boys at age 3 years, according to a study published online Jan. 31 in JAMA Pediatrics. Megumi Kushima, from the University of Yamanashi in Chuo, Japan, and colleagues examined the association between screen time in infancy and development of autism spectrum disorder at age 3 years using data from 84,030 mother-child dyads in a large birth cohort in Japan. Screen time was measured at age 1 year. The researchers found that at age 3 years, the prevalence of children with autism spectrum disorder was 392 per 100,000 (0.4 percent) and boys were three times more likely than girls to be diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Read More

ADHD Medicine May Treat Symptoms of Genetic Movement Disorder in Children, Study Finds

Using a common attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medication appears to help manage the symptoms of a rare and currently difficult to treat genetic movement disorder primarily found in children, according to a new study from a University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) researcher Andrea Meredith, PhD, and her collaborators. The disorder, KCNMA1-linked channelopathy, named after the affected gene, can cause abnormal, involuntary movements from collapsing episodes, in which patients slump forward with their arms and legs appearing rigid. These episodes can occur up to 300 times per day, putting patients at risk of serious injury. The researcher found that the stimulant drug, lisdexamfetamine, reduced these attacks and may help other accompanying symptoms, such as seizures and developmental delays, as well. Read More

COVID-19 Pandemic Responsible for Increased Need for Pediatric Behavioral Health Services

A recent investigation into metal health resources for children and young adults during the COVID-19 pandemic suggested an increasing need for pediatric behavioral health services and outpatient treatment. Though the data did not suggest a causative relationship between the pandemic and pediatric mental illness, they did show the number of youths presenting to pediatric primary care clinicians with mental health concerns increased during the COVID-19 pandemic compared to prior years—as did the rate of complexity in their presentations. In recent studies, pandemic-related social isolation, school closures, and anxiety about the future had been associated with mental health burden among young people. Read More



JOB POSTINGS

* Executive Director, GROW Associates - GROW provides services for individuals with disabilities in the greater Brockton area to plan their individual goals and supports them in achieving those goals. GROW provides a wide range of services to almost 300 people. These programs include Day Habilitation, Community- Based Day Supports, Vocational Training and Employment Services. GROW Associates' services helps adults with developmental disabilities achieve a sense of accomplishment and self-worth. To learn more- Click here

* Principal - We work with Chicago Public Schools and with school districts from the Suburban Cook County, Lake County, and the Western Suburbs to serve students who are referred based on their need for a highly structured, therapeutic school setting and individualized approach to learning.  Students who are referred by a public school district are educated at Knapp School & Yeshiva at no cost to their families. In doing so we provide both academic and social and emotional supports that are aligned with each student’s specific strengths and needs. To learn more- Click here

* Senior Director of Program Operations Aspire Living & Learning - Aspire Living & Learning is a non-profit human services agency making a meaningful difference in the lives of neurodiverse adults and children. We provide residential programs, day support, special education, and employment services in partnership with families and in collaboration with public and private health, human service, education and other government agencies. Headquartered in Vermont, our 1,200 team members serve individuals across four Northeast and Mid-Atlantic states. To learn more- Click here

* Teach SPED 22-23 School Year - At New Visions for Public Schools, we work to make great public schools common in New York City. We believe that all of New York City’s students deserve public schools that make successful futures possible, especially Black, Latinx, and low-income students who have historically had inequitable access to a great public education. To learn more- Click here

* Strategist II: ID Teacher - Join Ames Community School District, where your journey matters! ACSD promotes an educational environment that is racially, ethnically, linguistically, and culturally diverse to broaden students' academic experience and to enrich our District. We are focused on creating and supporting diversity, equity, and inclusion within the organizational culture and in our community. To learn more- Click here

* Integrated Services Teacher - Join Ames Community School District, where your journey matters! ACSD promotes an educational environment that is racially, ethnically, linguistically, and culturally diverse to broaden students' academic experience and to enrich our District. We are focused on creating and supporting diversity, equity, and inclusion within the organizational culture and in our community. To learn more- Click here

* Strategist I Teacher - Join Ames Community School District, where your journey matters! ACSD promotes an educational environment that is racially, ethnically, linguistically, and culturally diverse to broaden students' academic experience and to enrich our District. We are focused on creating and supporting diversity, equity, and inclusion within the organizational culture and in our community. To learn more- Click here

* Behavior Interventionist - Join Ames Community School District, where your journey matters! ACSD promotes an educational environment that is racially, ethnically, linguistically, and culturally diverse to broaden students' academic experience and to enrich our District. We are focused on creating and supporting diversity, equity, and inclusion within the organizational culture and in our community. To learn more- Click here

* Director of Student Recruitment - Reporting to the Chief Operating Officer, the Director of Student Recruitment is responsible for creating and leading the student recruitment, enrollment, and retention strategy for all DREAM schools, ensuring we achieve 100% enrollment across all grades and schools. This includes, but is not limited to collaborating with key network and schools leaders and staff, reporting, training, accountability management, data analysis, and developing and rolling out new practices and updates to existing practices. To learn more- Click here

* [2022-2023] 7th Grade Learning Specialist - Reporting to the Academic Dean, the Learning Specialist will be responsible for providing tailored support to students with special education needs, through integrated co-teaching, in small group settings, or a combination of both. This is an exciting opportunity for a seasoned educator who is passionate about ensuring all students succeed and thrive in school. To learn more- Click here

* [2022-2023] Middle School Learning Specialist - Reporting to the Academic Dean, the Learning Specialist will be responsible for providing tailored support to students with special education needs, through integrated co-teaching, in small group settings, or a combination of both. This is an exciting opportunity for a seasoned educator who is passionate about ensuring all students succeed and thrive in school. To learn more- Click here

* Executive Director, MARCH Inc. of Manchester (CT) - MARCH, Inc. of Manchester (MARCH) seeks a leader experienced in intellectual and developmental disabilities to position the organization for growth and sustainability by anticipating trends and changes in the developmental disabilities field in Connecticut. We are looking for an Executive Director skilled in external relations, partnership building, fundraising, and communications, balanced with being able to build its people and agency operations. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher, Institutional Settings - Dedicated and collaborative teams of educators committed to supporting teaching excellence through coaching, professional development and excellent administrative support. CES prides itself on providing robust and engaging learning opportunities to all its teachers. To learn more- Click here

* [Immediate Hire] High School Math Learning Specialist - Reporting to the Academic Dean, the High School Math Learning Specialist will be responsible for providing tailored support to students with special education needs, through integrated co-teaching, in small group settings, or a combination of both. This is an exciting opportunity for a seasoned educator who is passionate about ensuring all students succeed and thrive in school. To learn more- Click here

* [2021-2022] Reading Interventionist - The Reading Interventionist will be responsible for providing tailored support to students that are reading significantly below grade level in grades K-2 through small group instruction (3-4 students) and push-in support. This is an exciting opportunity for a seasoned educator who is passionate about ensuring all students succeed and thrive in school. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Rivermont, is a subsidiary of New Story Schools, which is an educational organization comprised of special education schools in Pennsylvania, Virginia, Ohio, New Jersey, and Massachusetts. We offer an academic learning environment integrated with behavior support services for students diagnosed with autism or emotional/behavioral disorders. To learn more- Click here

* Principal - Our multidisciplinary teams collaborate with families, school districts and community partners to empower children in overcoming challenges and creating new stories in their lives. Do you have a passion for education and being a part of a mission-driven organization?  Do you want to join a fast-growing company with excellent benefits, such as tuition reimbursement, generous paid time off, and so much more? To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Do you aspire to help children with diverse challenges build skills for their future? Are you ready to make a real impact in their lives? As a Special Education Teacher at Bancroft, you will draw upon a wealth of curriculum and clinical resources to design individualized student goals. To learn more- Click here

* Director of Oregon Migrant Education Service Center - The Director position for the Oregon Migrant Education Service Center (OMESC) will provide leadership for the 3rd largest migrant education  program in the nation that includes nine education service districts and nine district regional program. To learn more- Click here

* Executive Director of Special Education - Willamette Education Service District is accepting applications for a full-time (40 hours per week) Executive Director of Special Education position.  Successful candidate will work as a member of the Special Education Department and will follow a 240-day calendar. This position will be based at the Willamette ESD Marion Center in Salem, OR and will begin July 1, 2022. To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Teacher-Options Program - The teacher would need to be passionate about supporting inclusion in an academically rigorous environment as well as qualified to teach differentiated, developmental instruction based on student needs. The options Program teacher would help support success for both the student and general education teacher in the inclusion classroom. The teacher is also a key member of the larger Special Services team and should be excited to not only teach, but also work collaboratively to grow this new program. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher (All Specializations) - 2022-23 School Year - DCPS serves approximately 49,000 students in the nation's capital through the efforts of approximately 4,200 educators in 117 schools. As part of a comprehensive reform effort to become the preeminent urban school system in America, DCPS intends to have the highest-performing, best paid (Salary Range: $56,313 - $90,905), most satisfied, and most honored educator force in the nation and a distinctive central office staff whose work supports and drives instructional excellence and significant achievement gains for DCPS students. To learn more- Click here

* Middle School Special Education Teacher - The Halton School, an independent school for students with Asperger’s, is looking for a Middle School Special Education teacher. The teacher will provide special education instruction to students in a small multi-grade class. The teacher will utilize a variety of teaching methods to meet student’s educational needs and adapt and develop instructional materials accordingly. To learn more- Click here

* Director of McKay Academic Center (Academic Support) - The Dunham School is a PK-12, non-denominational Christian, independent school serving 785 students on one campus. The school offers fee paid tutoring, coaching, small group instruction and individual courses for students with a range of learning challenges including ADD, ADHD, dyslexia, dysgraphia and high functioning autism. To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Teacher - STARS is owned and operated by Occupational Therapists. You will be an employee and receive full benefits. Summers off with year-round pay and year-round appreciation. With a proven track record, STARS is able to offer you an unbeatable support system and resources. STARS is hiring for the 2021-2022 and 2022-2023 school years. STARS places Special Education Teachers throughout the Phoenix, Tucson and the surrounding area public schools. To learn more- Click here

* Middle School and High School Special Needs Teacher at the Anglo-American School of Sofia - We are a school of extraordinary families and outstanding teachers. We are an inspiring educational community - nestled in the stunning foothills of Mount Vitosha on the outskirts of Sofia. We are an exceptional IB world school offering children from 4 to 18 years a world class educational experience. We take pride in academic achievement, and value creativity and athletic talent with equal vigor. We offer a curriculum and approach that looks beyond the classroom and prepares our students for the challenges and opportunities that the world has to offer. To learn more- Click here

If you are an Employer looking for excellent special education staff - Click here for more information


FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Courage results when one’s convictions are bigger than one’s fears.

Orrin Woodward

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