Week in Review - January 1, 2016

WEEK IN REVIEW

New NASET Publications and Articles of Interest in Special Education and Disabilities That Were Reported This Week

January 1, 2016 - Vol 12, Issue 1


 

Find us on Facebook

 

 

Forward this issue to a Friend

 

Join Our Mailing List!

In This Issue

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK


Dear NASET News,

Happy New Year! Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW Here, we provide you with the latest publications from NASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW at news@naset.org. Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,


NASET News Team

NASET Sponsor - Upbility

 


New This Week on NASET

NASET's HOW TO Series
December 2015

Strategies for Improving Handwriting
From: Julia Van Alst at Make, Take & Teach

There is so much you can learn about a student's phonics skills just from looking at writing samples. One of the big "ah-ha" moments from my Phonics First training (Orton-Gillingham based program) was when the trainer said that a student has not fully mastered a phonics rule until you see him/her use it in writing. Of course, that makes sense. Sometimes you just need someone to point out the obvious. Since that time, I've made it a point to really take some time to analyze writing samples. One of the problems I'm having with some students is actually trying to read what they are writing. This issue has led to numerous conversations with our Occupational Therapists regarding handwriting. Admittedly, it the past, when I came across illegible writing, I was quick to call in the OT. But lately, in the spirit of Response to Intervention (RtI), I've been working with teachers in providing strategies first.


&

NASET's HOW TO Series
December 2015

How to Determine Extended School Year Services

Extended School Year Services (ESY)
As the school year comes to a close, parents may want to know if their children are entitled to Extended School Year Services (ESY). These services are provided to children with special needs that the school feels may lose his/her knowledge of what they learned over the summer months unless they are given added services during this time. The need for ESY services must be determined on an individual basis by the admission, review, and dismissal (IEP) committee.



To read or download this issue - Click here (login required)

______________________________________________________

NASET's Special Educator e-Journal
January 2016

Table of Contents

* Update from the U.S. Department of Education

* Buzz from the Hub

* Intersection: Navigating the Road to Work

* Latest Employment Opportunities Posted on NASET

* Acknowledgements
To read or download this issue - Click here (login required)

______________________________________________________

See NASET's Latest Job Listings

Marijuana Chemical May Help Prevent Epileptic Seizures in Kids, Young Adults

A pill containing cannabidiol (CBD), a key ingredient in marijuana, may reduce seizures for children and young adults with epilepsy, new research suggests. However, the researchers and outside experts agreed that more investigation is needed before the treatment could be approved for patients. The finding stems from an investigation led by Dr. Orrin Devinsky, director of the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City. Conducted during 2014 and 2015, the study involved more than 200 patients at 11 epilepsy care centers across the United States. Patients were between the ages of 1 and 30, and all had been diagnosed with a form of treatment-resistant epilepsy. To read more,click here

NASET Member Looking for Content Expert for Dissertation

My name is Lisa Rutner and I am looking for a content expert for my dissertation.  I am a student at Grand Canyon University and have already attended my first residency. My topic is: Exploring strategies middle school teachers need to implement the Multi-tiered Support System with fidelity.  Please contact me at 954-288-6627954-288-6627 or lisa.rutner@marion.k12.fl.us.  Thank you

Hotel Centered Around Workers With Special Needs Set To Open

A first-of-its-kind, fully-functioning teaching hotel designed to provide job training and employment for people with disabilities is ready to open its doors. The 150-room Courtyard Muncie at Horizon Convention Center in Muncie, Ind. will open with a ribbon cutting on Dec. 22. From day one, at least 20 percent of the Courtyard by Marriott hotel's 129-person workforce will be people with developmental and other types of disabilities. To read more,click here
AASEP Logo

NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

Lifesharing Offers Alternative To Group Homes

Early one morning, after yet another nightmare, Clara Hopson pushed the quilt off her small frame and shuffled down the hall. The 85-year-old, who has an intellectual disability and trouble getting around, wept as she approached Bernadette Obermeier's bedside and slipped under the blanket. "I said, 'Come in bed with me,'" Obermeier recalled. "We're not going to let anything happen to you." Hopson and Elaine Ciccotelli, 66, live in Obermeier's Whitehall home as part of Lifesharing, a family-living program that offers an alternative to a group home setting for people with intellectual disabilities. Ciccotelli has been there since 2008; Hopson moved in four years later. To read more, click here

Diagnosing Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

Diagnosing fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is important to help children and adults, and their families, who have the disorder. A new Canadian guideline published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal), provides recommendations for diagnosing FASD, specifically for multidisciplinary diagnostic teams. FASD is a neurodevelopmental disorder resulting from prenatal alcohol exposure. Individuals with FASD can experience complex behavioral and intellectual problems that persist throughout the lifespan and can become increasingly complicated if unsupported. The need for early and accurate diagnosis is critical for improving outcomes and quality of life. "These new recommendations, based on the latest evidence for diagnosing FASD, will improve how we diagnose the disorder and help individuals and their families," states Dr. Jocelynn Cook, Canada Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Research Network and the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. To read more, click here

NASET Sponsor - Reading Pen

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

THE TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK WILL RETURN ON JANUARY 8, 2016

NASET Sponsor - Upbility

Special Education Law Symposium at Lehigh University

Lehigh University announces its week-long Special Education Law Symposium to be held June 19-24, 2016 on its Bethlehem, Pennsylvania campus. Annually attracting an audience of over one hundred registrants from across the country, the symposium addresses "hot topics" emerging in court decisions as well as topics suggested by eminent school and parent attorneys who serve as the symposium faculty.

The symposium will include a special two-day (June 23-24) option on the Complaint Resolution Process (CRP), a training component for state complaint investigators and others interested in CRP. Scheduled topics for the "advanced" symposium section of experienced professionals are Dyslexia, Compensatory Education, Statute of Limitations, Discipline Nuances, Placement Decision-making, and IDEA/Section 504 Hot Spots, such as service animals, individual health plans (including concussions), and money damages.
Individuals new to special education law will explore in depth the basics of the IDEA and Section 504, including Child Find and Eligibility, FAPE, LRE, Remedies, and Discipline.
Dr. Perry Zirkel will offer a day-long National Case Law Update and Crystal Ball to all registrants on Friday, June 24, chronicling the important decisions of the prior year and predicting issues likely to emerge.
Lehigh University graduate credit is available. In addition to week-long registration, one-day and multiple-day options are available. For further information, see the symposium website at coe.lehigh.edu/law.

More Computer Time May Be Causing Nearsightedness in U.S. Kids

Children who spend lots of time indoors and on computers and other electronic devices may be raising their risk for nearsightedness, a panel of U.S. ophthalmology experts suggests. The prevalence of Americans with nearsightedness -- also known as myopia -- has nearly doubled over the last 50 years, the ophthalmologists noted. The ophthalmologists suspect the increase is due to "near work" -- focusing on something close to your eyes -- and the decreased amount of time spent outdoors in natural light. "Kids are spending much more time doing indoor activities with their cellphones, iPads, computers, and so on," said Dr. Rohit Varma, director of the University of Southern California Eye Institute in Los Angeles. To read more, click here

NASET Membership Benefit -  Discounts for NASET Members

ad for Office Depot

To learn more - Click here

Childhood Family Breakups Harder on Girls' Health, Study Reports

A childhood family breakup can have long-term negative consequences for the children. Recent University of Illinois research looks at overall health, depression, and smoking as a health-related behavior and finds that, for girls, all three are worse. "Girls' health is more sensitive to family structure," says Andrea Beller, a U of I economist who studies educational attainment and the effects of single-parent family living. "Prior research shows that family breakups affect boys more than girls through cognitive, educational, and emotional channels. We find that, if you grow up in a non-traditional family structure--single parent or step-parent or a cohabiting relationship, girls are more likely than boys to be depressed and report worse overall health." To read more, click here

Noisy Electronic Toys May Hamper Babies' Verbal Skills

As parents scramble to find the perfect gifts for their children this Christmas, new research suggests that electronic toys that light up, talk or play music might slow language development in toddlers. These pricey toys may seem ideal for developing minds, but researchers at Northern Arizona University said they found just the opposite: when toys talk and sing, babies don't. "These results provide a basis for discouraging the purchase of electronic toys that are promoted as educational and are often quite expensive," according to the report published in the Dec. 23 online edition of JAMA Pediatrics. To read more, click here

NASET Members Only

Scientists Find New Vessel for Detecting Autism

Evidence of autism may be found in the composition and malfunction of the brain's blood vessels, a team of scientists has found. Their research sheds new light on the causes of autism, which previously had pointed to neurological make-up rather than to the vascular system, and identifies a new target for potential therapeutic intervention. "Our findings show that those afflicted with autism have unstable blood vessels, disrupting proper delivery of blood to the brain," explains Efrain Azmitia, a professor in NYU's Department of Biology and the study's senior author. To read more, click here

NASET - Members Only Savings

NASET is pleased to provide our members with exclusive access to discounts on products and services. These savings are available to all current NASET members. To find out more about savings from Life Lock, Avis, Budget, Cruises Only, Orlando Vacations and more - Click here

Slight Signs of Lingering Brain Damage Seen in Young Athletes After Concussion

Young children may suffer minor, but lingering, brain damage from a single concussion, a small study suggests. The findings don't prove that a single concussion caused the differences that were revealed in brain scans and thinking tests that were given an average of two years after a reported concussion. And even if just one concussion did some damage, it's not clear that the children suffered any noticeable neurological problems, the researchers added. But the results raise further questions even if the kids aren't currently suffering any ill effects, said Dr. Christopher Giza, a professor of pediatric neurology and neurosurgery at David Geffen School of Medicine and Mattel Children's Hospital in Los Angeles. To read more, click here

More Kids with Autism Evaluated as Preschoolers, but More Progress Needed in Early Recognition

An increasing proportion of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are undergoing recommended evaluation in the preschool years--but population rates of ASD remain higher in eight-year-olds compared to four-year-olds, reports a study in the Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, the official journal of the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. Based on nationwide monitoring data, the study "offers valuable insight into the early identification of ASD and suggests some progression towards lowering the age of first evaluation in participating communities," write Dr. Daisy Christensen of the National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities and colleagues. To read more, click here

Skin-to-Skin Contact May Lower Preemies' Risk of Death: Review

Tiny newborns who get prolonged skin-to-skin contact with mom while they're in the hospital may have better survival odds, a new review finds. Experts said the analysis, of 124 studies from around the world, confirms the value of "kangaroo care" for premature newborns. The concept goes back to the 1970s, when a doctor in Colombia started advocating the practice as an alternative to incubators, which are not readily available in some parts of the world. Instead, mothers hold their newborn against the chest, skin-to-skin, with a blanket over the baby. Research since then has shown that kangaroo care not only regulates newborns' body temperature, but also improves other vital signs -- like heart rate and breathing -- and promotes breast-feeding. To read more, click here
AASEP Logo

NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

Children with Specific Birth Defects at Increased Risk for Abuse

Children born with cleft lip or palate and spina bifida are at an increased risk for abuse before the age of 2, according to researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).The results were published in the December issue of the journal Pediatrics. In the study, researchers found that compared to children without birth defects the risk of maltreatment in children with cleft lip and/or palate was increased by 40 percent and for children with spina bifida, the risk was increased by 58 percent. These rates were especially high during the first year of life. However, children with Down syndrome were not at an increased risk compared to children with no birth defects. To read more, click here

Is Chemical Exposure in Mothers, Babies, Linked to Poor Vaccine Response?

Early life exposures to toxic chemicals such as PCBs and DDT dampen an infant's response to the tuberculosis vaccine, according to a new study. PCBs were used in manufacturing and in consumer products in the United States until their ban in 1979. Despite this, nearly all people have detectable concentrations in their blood, even those who live in unindustrialized areas around the globe. DDT, although banned in the U.S., is still used in some countries to control malaria spread by mosquitos. To read more, click here

Child Paralysis Cases Spiked During Virus Outbreak: Study

Doctors have learned more about a "polio-like" mystery illness that has stricken dozens of American children, but its exact cause remains elusive, according to a new report. At least 120 children in 34 states have fallen ill with so-called acute flaccid myelitis since August 2014, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The disease involves a sudden onset of paralysis or weakness in one or more limbs. It turns out that acute flaccid myelitis cases in California spiked significantly during a national outbreak of enterovirus D68, a virus in the same family as polio, researchers report in the Dec. 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. To read more, click here

NASET Sponsor - Antioch University

Sex Differences in Brain May Underlie Neurodevelopmental Disorders More Common in Males

Many early-onset neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism spectrum disorders, are more common in males than females. The origin of this gender bias is not understood, partially due to a major gap in research on sex differences regarding how the brain typically develops. According to a new study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, female infants have larger volumes of gray matter around the temporal-parietal junction of the brain than males at the time of birth. The temporal-parietal junction, or TP, which is found under the temporal bones near the ears, integrates the processing of social information as expressed in others' faces and voices, a function that is impaired in those with autism spectrum disorders. Sex differences in this area of the brain may be a clue as to why males are at higher risk for certain forms of autism spectrum disorders. To read more, click here

Honor Society for Special Education Teachers

Omega-gamma-chi-logo

To learn more - Click here

 

Nasal Spray May Give Diabetics Faster Treatment for Low Blood Sugar

A new nasal spray might make rescue care easier for diabetics who are woozy or even unconscious due to severe low blood sugar, a new clinical trial suggests. The nasal spray contains powdered glucagon, a hormone that causes a prompt increase in blood sugar levels. The trial results showed that the nasal spray is nearly as effective in treating hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) as the only option currently available, a glucagon powder that must be mixed with water, drawn into a syringe and then injected into muscle. To read more, click here

jobsNASET's Latest Job Listings

* Special Education Teacher (2016-17) - RePublic Schools is a network of high-performing public charter schools based in Nashville, TN and Jackson, MS with a mission to reimagine public education in the South and prepare all of our scholars to graduate from college. To learn more- Click here

* Director, Newton's Early Childhood Program - The Newton Early Childhood Program, which is part of the Student Services Department of the Newton Public Schools, operates 8 inclusive classrooms of approximately 15 students each ages 3-5 who reside in Newton.  To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Coordinator/Teacher - We are looking for candidates who have experience in progressive education and diverse communities, and a solid understanding of supporting the academic, social and emotional development of young children of all learning styles and needs. To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Progressus Therapy has incredible opportunities for Special Education Teachers...or, as we like to call them, Superheroes.  If you use your super powers to help ensure that children have access to the best education possible in the least restrictive environment, we would love for you to join the Progressus Therapy team! To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Looking to make a difference in the lives of children?  Progressus Therapy has rewarding opportunities available for Special Education Teachers in Chicago for an immediate start.  You will have the opportunity to help children achieve their greatest potential. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Progressus Therapy has incredible opportunities for Special Education Teachers...or, as we like to call them, Superheroes.  If you use your super powers to help ensure that children have access to the best education possible in the least restrictive environment, we would love for you to join the Progressus Therapy team! To learn more -
Click here

* Special Education Specialist - provides technical assistance across one or more contracts in administering assessment programs for students with significant cognitive disabilities. Develops special education content materials for professional development, item development and the administration of alternate assessments. To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Teacher - ChanceLight is currently hiring Special Education Teachers in the Northern California region. ChanceLight™ Behavioral Health & Education is the nation's leading provider of behavioral health and education solutions for children and young adults. Formerly known as Educational Services of America (ESA), ChanceLight serves more than 13,500 clients and students each day.  To learn more -Click here

* Intervention Specialist- Canton, OH - Join a fun, flexible, team-build environment as a Virtual Intervention Specialist with Light Street Special Education Solutions, a division of Learn It Systems. Teachers must have a Special Education K-12 Cross Categorical teaching certificate. To learn more -
Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Exceptional Children's Foundation (ECF) provides the highest quality services for children and adults who are challenged with developmental, learning and emotional disabilities - empowering them to reach their greatest potential. Each year, ECF serves more than 3,700 clients and their families at 15 sites throughout Los Angeles County. To learn more - Click here

Food For Thought..........

Whether we want them or not, the New Year will bring new challenges; whether we seize them or not, the New Year will bring new opportunities.
Michael Josephson