Week in Review - December 25, 2015

WEEK IN REVIEW

New NASET Publications and Articles of Interest in Special Education and Disabilities That Were Reported This Week

December 25, 2015 - Vol 11, Issue 51


 

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In This Issue

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK


Dear NASET News,

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW Here, we provide you with the latest publications from NASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW atnews@naset.org. Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,


NASET News Team

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New This Week on NASET

NASET's Educating Children with Severe
Disabilities Series

Comprehensive Overview of Intellectual Disability
Issue #34

What is Intellectual Disability?

Intellectual Disability is a term used when a person has certain limitations in mental functioning and in skills such as communicating, taking care of him or herself, and social skills. These limitations will cause a child to learn and develop more slowly than a typical child. Children with Intellectual Disability may take longer to learn to speak, walk, and take care of their personal needs such as dressing or eating. They are likely to have trouble learning in school. They will learn, but it will take them longer. There may be some things they cannot learn.
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Scientists Link Brain Chemical to Autism

Scientists say they've discovered a specific chemical in the brain they believe is linked to autism. The Harvard University researchers found that autistic behavior is associated with a breakdown in the signaling pathway used by a major inhibitory neurotransmitter called GABA. "This is the first time, in humans, that a neurotransmitter in the brain has been linked to autistic behavior. This theory -- that the GABA signaling pathway plays a role in autism -- has been shown in animal models, but until now we never had evidence for it actually causing autistic differences in humans," study leader Caroline Robertson said in a university news release. To read more, click here

NASET Members Only

Genetic Abnormality May Explain Health Complications of Down Syndrome

People with Down syndrome have long been known to face a higher risk for a range of other illnesses, including heart disease, diabetes and immune disorders. Now, a new study has honed in on a possible cause: too much of a specific gene that disturbs the peripheral nervous system. The peripheral nervous system is involved in basic organ-related activities. These activities include heartbeat, blood pressure and blood sugar levels, the Johns Hopkins University researchers explained. They looked at tissue samples from both mice and people with Down syndrome. They found that those with Down syndrome carry three times the normal amount of a certain gene called RCAN1. This particular gene helps regulate a protein known as "nerve growth factor." To read more, click here

More U.S. Kids Have Type 1 Diabetes, But Researchers Don't Know Why

The number of U.S. kids living with type 1 diabetes has increased by almost 60 percent since 2002, and experts are not sure why. Using a national database, researchers found that the prevalence of type 1 diabetes stood at just under 1.5 cases per 1,000 children and teenagers in 2002. By 2013, that figure had risen to 2.3 per 1,000. The study, published online Dec. 17 in the journal Diabetes Care, adds to evidence of a global -- and puzzling -- rise in type 1 diabetes. Unlike type 2 diabetes -- a common adulthood disease -- type 1 diabetes has nothing to do with obesity. It's an autoimmune disease in which the immune system mistakenly attacks the cells that produce insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar. To read more, click here
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NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Education establishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

A Newborn's Heart Attack Shows Heart Can Regrow, Recover

Scientists who saved the life of a newborn after a massive heart attack say the case shows that the human heart can fully recover after suffering major damage. The heart attack suffered by the infant in the first hours of life was caused by a blockage in one of the heart's main blood vessels. "The baby's heart was severely damaged. Astonishingly, the baby recovered very quickly," study author Bernhard Haubner, from the Institute of Molecular Biotechnology in Vienna, Austria, said in an institute news release. Findings from the study were published online Dec. 9 in the journal Circulation Research. To read more, click here

NASET Sponsor - Upbility

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

THE TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK WILL RETURN ON JANUARY 8, 2016

High School Seniors Now More Likely to Smoke Pot Than Cigarettes: Survey

For the first time, more U.S. high school seniors are smoking marijuana than tobacco, a new survey shows. Daily marijuana use remained relatively stable at 6 percent, while those seniors who said they smoked cigarettes every day dropped from 6.7 percent in 2014 to 5.5 percent, the researchers found. The same trend has been seen on college campuses, with a recent report showing that more college students (6 percent) now smoke a joint each day than light up a cigarette (5 percent). "While we have seen no increase in marijuana use, we continue to see deterioration in the perceived riskiness of marijuana," said Dr. Wilson Compton, deputy director at the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). "That often has been a predictor of greater use of marijuana in future years." To read more, click here

Asthma Linked to Chronic Migraines in Some People

People with asthma may be more than twice as likely to develop chronic migraines as those without breathing troubles, a new study suggests. The research included about 4,500 Americans. At the start of the study in 2008, the study volunteers had fewer than 15 migraines a month. One year later, the researchers looked to see how many had chronic migraine -- 15 or more migraines a month. More than 5 percent of people with asthma developed chronic migraine. Just 2.5 percent of those without asthma ended up with chronic migraines, the study found. To read more, click here

Kids Find Help for Anorexia More Often Than 'Pro-Ana' Posts on YouTube

For years, people surfing YouTube may have accidently or intentionally encountered so-called "pro-ana" videos extolling the virtues of a deadly disease: anorexia. But a new Norwegian study finds that people opposed to these pro-anorexia videos have mounted a response. Now, the vast majority of anorexia-themed videos posted to YouTube actually encourage recovery and warn viewers about the dangers of the eating disorder. Researchers analyzed the nature of widely viewed anorexia material because of concerns that viewers, especially diet-conscious young girls, might be swayed by videos promoting this unhealthy behavior. To read more, click here

NASET - Members Only Savings

NASET is pleased to provide our members with exclusive access to discounts on products and services. These savings are available to all current NASET members. To find out more about savings from Life Lock, Avis, Budget, Cruises Only, Orlando Vacations and more - Click here

Others' Drug, Alcohol Use May Trigger Bad Behavior in Teens

Seeing other people drink or use drugs can trigger antisocial behavior in kids, a new study suggests. Duke University researchers used cellphones to survey about 150 children between the ages of 11 and 15 three times a day for 30 days. The study participants completed more than 90 percent of the surveys. On days when they saw others drink alcohol or use drugs, participants were two times more likely to engage in behaviors such as stealing, damaging property, or hitting or hurting someone. But those with a "risk-taking" gene associated with sensitivity to substance-use exposure were six times more likely to commit such acts, according to the study published online Dec. 9 in the journal Development and Psychopathology. To read more, click here

ADHD May Hamper Social Relationships Early in Life

Young children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may experience more problems socializing with their peers, which can then contribute to worsening symptoms, a new study from Norway suggests. But the cycle between symptoms and social problems seems to diminish as children grow older, the study authors said. "Restless kids tend to be less attractive as play partners, due to their problems with sustaining attention to rules, being alert to other kids' ideas and a limited understanding of turn-taking," said study author Frode Stenseng. Stenseng is an associate professor at the Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare at Norwegian University of Science and Technology. To read more, click here

NASET Sponsor - Antioch University

Graduation Rate Trending Up For Students With Disabilities

For the third year in row, federal officials say that the graduation rate for the nation's students with disabilities is on the rise. Figures released this week indicate that the graduation rate for those with disabilities hit 63.1 percent for the 2013-2014 school year. That's an increase over the 61.9 percent reported for the 2012-2013 school year and growth of 4.1 percent over three years, the U.S. Department of Education said. The gains come as federal education officials are touting four years in a row of record-high graduation rates across the country with some 82.3 percent of all students receiving diplomas during the 2013-2014 school year. To read more, click here

Certain Antidepressants May Be Linked to Bipolar Disorder: Study

Some commonly used antidepressants may increase certain patients' risk of developing mania or bipolar disorder, a large study suggests. The strongest link was for depressed patients prescribed Effexor (venlafaxine) or antidepressants called serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), the British study found. SSRIs include citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil) and sertraline (Zoloft). However, many patients who developed mania or bipolar symptoms likely had underlying bipolar disorder or a predisposition because of family history or other factors, the researchers believe. To read more, click here
AASEP Logo

NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

Stem Cell Transplants May Not Help Tough-to-Treat Crohn's, Study Says

Stem cell transplants seem no better than conventional therapy for Crohn's disease that hasn't responded to other treatments, a new study finds. The European study also found that for patients who cannot undergo surgery for the condition, stem cell transplants resulted in serious side effects, including infections. "In this group of the most resistant cases of Crohn's disease, stem cell transplant was an effective treatment, but it is not a miracle cure that could be applied to anyone with Crohn's disease, because it only seems to work in a minority of patients and the treatment is challenging and hazardous," said lead researcher Christopher Hawkey. He is a professor of gastroenterology at Queen's Medical Centre in Nottingham, England. To read more, click here

A Bet On Inclusion Pays Off

In the basement kitchen of a stone church nestled in the Green Mountains, Rachel Wollum studied her reflection in an oven window, adjusting her auburn hair and orange polka-dot dress until they were just right. Satisfied with her appearance, Wollum, who is 26 and has Down syndrome, carefully poured four trays of freshly baked chocolate-chip cookies into bags bearing her name. Then, with the intensity of a drama student, she rehearsed lines familiar to almost every store clerk in Middlebury, where "Rachel's Cookies" are now a household name. To read more, click here

Antidepressants in Pregnancy May Raise Autism Risk, Study Suggests

Women who take antidepressants during the final two trimesters of pregnancy may put their children at risk for autism spectrum disorder, a new Canadian study suggests. Researchers said it seemed that children had an 87 percent increased risk of autism if their mothers used antidepressants during the second and third trimester. The risk of autism rose even higher if a mother took a type of antidepressant called a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, or SSRI, the study found. These drugs include escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac) and sertraline (Zoloft). To read more, click here

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FBI Reports Rise In Disability-Related Hate Crimes

New federal data indicates that the number of reported hate crimes targeting people with disabilities has ticked up. There were 95 hate crime offenses related to disability bias last year, according to recently released statistics from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting Program. The 2014 numbers are up slightly compared to the previous year when the FBI recorded 92 offenses targeting people with disabilities. At the same time, however, the overall number of hate crimes documented fell to 5,479 criminal incidents in 2014. To read more, click here

Abuse of Prescription Painkillers, Stimulants Ups Sexual Risks for Teens

Teens who use abuse prescription drugs such as narcotic painkillers are more likely to have sex or to participate in risky sexual behaviors, a new study suggests. These risky behaviors included having sex with multiple partners, using drugs or alcohol before having sex or having sex without the use of a condom, the research revealed. The study looked at a variety of prescription drugs that might be used recreationally by teens. These included the prescription painkillers Oxycontin, Vicodin, Percocet or codeine; sedatives such as Xanax or Ativan; or stimulant drugs used to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), such as Adderall or Ritalin. To read more, click here

Children with ADHD Show Weaker Connections in Brain Networks Tied to Focus: Study

Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder may have weaker connections among brain networks that help the mind focus, a new study suggests. Using MRI brain scans from 180 children with and without ADHD, researchers found that kids with the disorder showed weaker interactions among three brain networks involved in attention. What's more, the more severe a child's attention problems, the weaker those brain connections were. The findings, published online Dec. 15 in the journal Biological Psychiatry, add to evidence that children with ADHD differ from other kids in the way their brains are wired. To read more,click here

jobsNASET's Latest Job Listings

* Special Education Teacher (2016-17) - RePublic Schools is a network of high-performing public charter schools based in Nashville, TN and Jackson, MS with a mission to reimagine public education in the South and prepare all of our scholars to graduate from college. To learn more-
Click here

* Director, Newton's Early Childhood Program - The Newton Early Childhood Program, which is part of the Student Services Department of the Newton Public Schools, operates 8 inclusive classrooms of approximately 15 students each ages 3-5 who reside in Newton.  To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Coordinator/Teacher - We are looking for candidates who have experience in progressive education and diverse communities, and a solid understanding of supporting the academic, social and emotional development of young children of all learning styles and needs. To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Progressus Therapy has incredible opportunities for Special Education Teachers...or, as we like to call them, Superheroes.  If you use your super powers to help ensure that children have access to the best education possible in the least restrictive environment, we would love for you to join the Progressus Therapy team! To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Looking to make a difference in the lives of children?  Progressus Therapy has rewarding opportunities available for Special Education Teachers in Chicago for an immediate start.  You will have the opportunity to help children achieve their greatest potential. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Progressus Therapy has incredible opportunities for Special Education Teachers...or, as we like to call them, Superheroes.  If you use your super powers to help ensure that children have access to the best education possible in the least restrictive environment, we would love for you to join the Progressus Therapy team! To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Specialist - provides technical assistance across one or more contracts in administering assessment programs for students with significant cognitive disabilities. Develops special education content materials for professional development, item development and the administration of alternate assessments. To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Teacher - ChanceLight is currently hiring Special Education Teachers in the Northern California region. ChanceLight™ Behavioral Health & Education is the nation's leading provider of behavioral health and education solutions for children and young adults. Formerly known as Educational Services of America (ESA), ChanceLight serves more than 13,500 clients and students each day.  To learn more - Click here

* Intervention Specialist- Canton, OH - Join a fun, flexible, team-build environment as a Virtual Intervention Specialist with Light Street Special Education Solutions, a division of Learn It Systems. Teachers must have a Special Education K-12 Cross Categorical teaching certificate. To learn more -Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Exceptional Children's Foundation (ECF) provides the highest quality services for children and adults who are challenged with developmental, learning and emotional disabilities - empowering them to reach their greatest potential. Each year, ECF serves more than 3,700 clients and their families at 15 sites throughout Los Angeles County. To learn more -Click here

Food For Thought..........

I hope that in this year to come, you make mistakes. Because if you are making mistakes, then you are making new things, trying new things, learning, living, pushing yourself, changing yourself, changing your world. You're doing things you've never done before, and more importantly, you're doing something.
Neil Gaiman