Week in Review - December 18, 2015

WEEK IN REVIEW

New NASET Publications and Articles of Interest in Special Education and Disabilities That Were Reported This Week

December 18, 2015 - Vol 11, Issue 50


 

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In This Issue

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK


Dear NASET News,

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW Here, we provide you with the latest publications from NASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW atnews@naset.org. Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,


NASET News Team

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New This Week on NASET

NASET's Parent Teacher Conference Handout
Issue #122

10 Reading Systems

Introduction There may be times when parents become curious about reading systems that they can use to try to help their children become better readers. This Parent Conference Teacher Handout explains 10 reading systems used in schools around the country.

To read or download this issue - Click here (login required)

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See NASET's Latest Job Listings

Is Brain Wiring to Blame for Some Teens' Bad Behavior?

Young people with behavioral problems, such as aggressive or antisocial behavior, appear to have noticeable differences in certain areas of their brains, new research suggests. Scientists at the University of Birmingham, England, analyzed brain imaging data from 13 studies that involved 394 youths with behavior problems and 350 normally developing kids. Those with behavioral issues had a lower volume of gray matter in areas of the brain involved in decision-making, empathy and the regulation of emotions, the study found. To read more, click here

Education Law Tightens Testing Cap For Students With Disabilities

With a new federal law, the nation's education landscape is getting an overhaul and advocates say they expect the changes are a step in the right direction for students with disabilities. President Barack Obama signed the Every Student Succeeds Act, a rewrite of the nation's primary education law previously known as No Child Left Behind. Years in the making, the new legislation grants significantly more power to states while continuing to require transparency from schools about the capabilities of their students, including those with disabilities. To read more, click here

NASET Sponsor - Antioch University

ADHD Diagnoses Rising Among U.S. Kids, Study Finds

A growing number of U.S. children have been diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) -- with girls and Hispanic children showing the biggest increases of all, a new study shows. Researchers found that in 2011, an estimated 12 percent of U.S. kids aged 5 to 17 had ever been diagnosed with ADHD. That was up 43 percent from 2003. "But what struck us the most were the increases among girls and Hispanic children," said senior researcher Sean Cleary, an associate professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at George Washington University, in Washington, D.C. To read more, click here

Therapeutic Riding Proves More Than Horse Play

Eddie Brennan is all charged up. The hyper 4-year-old, who has autism, has already charged through a puddle, and writhes as his nanny struggles to remove his shoes and socks. But when Brennan climbs on the back of Kattie, a dark bay therapy horse, something magical happens. The kinetic little boy becomes like Jell-O, melting into the horse, contented and somehow soothed. He sits or lays on its back - even rides backward. It's as if he has a connection to the horse. To read more, click here
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NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Education establishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

One in Five U.S. Kids Over Age 5 Has Unhealthy Cholesterol: CDC

Twenty-one percent of American children and teens have some form of "abnormal" blood cholesterol reading that leaves them at heightened risk for heart disease and stroke as they reach adulthood. That's the conclusion of a review of 2011-2014 federal health data compiled by researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Overall, slightly more than 13 percent of kids had unhealthily low levels of HDL ("good") cholesterol -- the kind that actually might help clear out arteries. The CDC says just over 8 percent had too-high levels of other forms of cholesterol that are bad for arteries, and more than 7 percent had unhealthily high levels of "total" cholesterol. To read more, click here

Kids With Asthma, Allergies May Face Higher Heart Risk Factors: Study

A new study suggests that kids with asthma or allergies like hay fever may face as much as a doubling of their risk of high blood pressure and high cholesterol -- even if they aren't overweight. However, the risk to any one child remains low, experts stressed, and it's not clear whether allergic diseases directly cause these problems. It's possible that another factor -- such as a lack of exercise -- could play a role. Still, study author Dr. Jonathan Silverberg, said, "You have common health problems that turn out to have a lot more serious consequences in some kids." To read more, click here

NASET Members Only

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Guess the answer to this week's trivia question and we'll recognize you in next week's Week in Review.

Congratulations to: Patsy Ray, Pamela Downing-Hosten, Olumide Akerele, Emily Cayon and Jennifer Klump who all knew the answer to last week's trivia question: According to the latest research in the field, teenagers who take drugs like Adderall and Ritalin to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are twice as likely to experience what by their peers versus who don't have ADHD?
ANSWER:  BULLYING


THE TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK WILL RETURN ON JANUARY 8, 2016

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Bullying Can Leave Lasting Mental Scars

Bullying can lead to lasting psychological effects for both victims and tormentors, researchers report. More than 20 percent of children who have suffered bullying are prone to depression serious enough to require medical help by their late 20s, researchers from Finland said. "Frequent victimization at age 8 is associated with adult psychiatric disorders needing treatment," said lead researcher Dr. Andre Sourander, a professor in the department of child psychiatry at the University of Turku. To read more, click here

Gene Therapy Shows Early Potential for Rare Immune System Disorder

Gene therapy might restore immunity in children and young adults with a rare inherited immune system disorder called X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, researchers report in a small study. The condition, which primarily affects males, is caused by mutations in the IL2RG gene that prevent normal development and function of infection-fighting immune cells. Patients are at high risk for life-threatening infections, according to background information with the study. This early study was designed to test the safety and effectiveness of the procedure. Much more work is needed before the treatment could be approved for patients. To read more, click here

No Drop In Cerebral Palsy Prevalence, CDC Finds

New federal data suggests that the number of children born with cerebral palsy is largely steady though some kids are at higher risk than others for the developmental condition. About 2.2 out of 1,000 children born in 2002 were diagnosed with congenital cerebral palsy - stemming from brain damage before or during birth - according to findings published online Wednesday in the journal Pediatrics. That's a slight increase over the 1.9 per 1,000 identified for children born in 1985, researchers said. To read more, click here

NASET - Members Only Savings

NASET is pleased to provide our members with exclusive access to discounts on products and services. These savings are available to all current NASET members. To find out more about savings from Life Lock, Avis, Budget, Cruises Only, Orlando Vacations and more - Click here

Concussions Are Biggest Health Risk to Cheerleaders

Concussion tops the list of injuries sustained by high school cheerleaders as the once-tame sideline activity becomes more daring and competitive, a new U.S. study finds. But cheerleading still ranks near the bottom of high school sports in terms of overall injury rate, according to the research, published online Dec. 10 in the journal Pediatrics. "Anecdotally, it's pretty clear to most people over the past few decades that cheerleading has shifted from a sideline activity to a competitive sport itself. This may have resulted in an increase in injury," said study author Dustin Currie, a doctoral student in epidemiology at Colorado School of Public Health at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. To read more, click here

Pediatricians Told To Bone Up On IDEA

A major physicians' group is urging doctors to learn more about special education services and to take a hands-on role in advocating for kids with disabilities.
In a clinical report published this month in the journal Pediatrics, the American Academy of Pediatrics says that doctors have a significant role to play in ensuring that children with disabilities get the services they need from schools. The 13-page report offers pediatricians a primer on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, detailing school districts' responsibilities to provide help for young children all the way through the transition to adulthood. To read more, click here

Despite Need, Residential Center Shuts Doors

As her teenage daughter grew older and stronger, Kelly Meara was effectively housebound. Audrey's rages spared no one. "She would not leave and she attacked everyone who came in the house," Meara said. "I had to wear a helmet." Obtaining short-term, residential treatment for older children with severe autism and behavioral problems is often impossible for Ohio families, and Meara struggled for years before she finally found a place for 17-year-old Audrey in August. To read more, click here
AASEP Logo

NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Education establishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

Disability Awareness Effort Asks People To 'Just Say Hi

Apple's Siri and CEO Tim Cook are the latest to sign on for a star-studded campaign encouraging people to lose their fear of interacting with those who have disabilities. Through a series of short videos, the awareness campaign from the Cerebral Palsy Foundation encourages people to "Just Say Hi." In addition to Cook, the group has produced spots featuring television hosts Gayle King and John Oliver, actors William H. Macy and Michael J. Fox, as well as Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella, among other recognizable faces. To read more, click here

Marijuana Chemical Shows Promise for Hard-to-Treat Epilepsy in Kids

Evidence is mounting that a marijuana-derived oil might benefit some children with epilepsy whose seizures aren't controlled by approved medications, two new studies show. Cannabidiol (CBD) significantly reduced seizures in as many as half of children with epilepsy, researchers planned to report Monday at the American Epilepsy Society's annual meeting, in Philadelphia. But experts say these positive findings may have been influenced by a "placebo effect." All participants in these studies knew they were taking the oil, which could have affected reports of its effectiveness. To read more, click here
Infant Weight Gain Linked to Possible Type 1 Diabetes Risk
Norwegian researchers have linked weight gain during the first year of life to a possible higher risk of type 1 diabetes. The mean weight gain during the first year of life was more than 6 kilograms (about 14 pounds), the study found. And for each additional kilogram (2.2 pounds) of weight gained during the first year of life above the mean, babies had 20 percent greater odds of developing type 1 diabetes by age 9 years, the researchers said. "The findings indicate that the early childhood environment influences the likelihood of developing type 1 diabetes," said lead researcher Maria Magnus, of the Norwegian Institute of Public Health in Oslo. To read more, click here

Wearable Devices Aim to Monitor Epileptic Seizures

Wearable devices aimed at tracking seizures in epilepsy patients are being developed, researchers report. Three such devices -- a patch, an arm band system and wrist-worn monitors -- were reviewed in three separate studies and presented this week at an American Epilepsy Society meeting in Philadelphia. They do not yet have U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval as medical devices for recording seizures. However, their success could be very helpful to neurologists treating patients with epilepsy, said Dr. Clifford Segil, a neurologist at Providence Saint John's Health Center in Santa Monica, Calif. Segil was not involved in the research. To read more, click here

Honor Society for Special Education Teachers

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Ovarian Cyst Condition in Mom May Raise Odds for Autism in Child

Children of mothers with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) may have an increased risk for autism, new research from Sweden suggests. This study is the first to find such a link, the researchers said. And, they added, the findings support the theory that exposure to sex hormones early in life may play an important role in a child's risk of autism. PCOS is a disorder in which a hormonal imbalance can cause changes in the menstrual cycle, ovarian cysts, trouble getting pregnant and other health problems. It affects 5 percent to 15 percent of women of childbearing age, the study authors said. To read more, click here

jobsNASET's Latest Job Listings

* Director, Newton's Early Childhood Program - The Newton Early Childhood Program, which is part of the Student Services Department of the Newton Public Schools, operates 8 inclusive classrooms of approximately 15 students each ages 3-5 who reside in Newton.  To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Coordinator/Teacher - We are looking for candidates who have experience in progressive education and diverse communities, and a solid understanding of supporting the academic, social and emotional development of young children of all learning styles and needs. To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Progressus Therapy has incredible opportunities for Special Education Teachers...or, as we like to call them, Superheroes.  If you use your super powers to help ensure that children have access to the best education possible in the least restrictive environment, we would love for you to join the Progressus Therapy team! To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Looking to make a difference in the lives of children?  Progressus Therapy has rewarding opportunities available for Special Education Teachers in Chicago for an immediate start.  You will have the opportunity to help children achieve their greatest potential. To learn more- Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Progressus Therapy has incredible opportunities for Special Education Teachers...or, as we like to call them, Superheroes.  If you use your super powers to help ensure that children have access to the best education possible in the least restrictive environment, we would love for you to join the Progressus Therapy team! To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Specialist - provides technical assistance across one or more contracts in administering assessment programs for students with significant cognitive disabilities. Develops special education content materials for professional development, item development and the administration of alternate assessments. To learn more - Click here

* Teacher and Program Advisor - Al Akhawayn School in Ifrane, Morocco (ASI), is starting a unique project of establishing a Special Educational Needs unit for deaf children using American Sign Language, and it is searching for a SEN professional with the right level of expertise and professional experience in the education of deaf/hard of hearing children to help launch and oversee the project. To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Teacher - ChanceLight is currently hiring Special Education Teachers in the Northern California region. ChanceLight™ Behavioral Health & Education is the nation's leading provider of behavioral health and education solutions for children and young adults. Formerly known as Educational Services of America (ESA), ChanceLight serves more than 13,500 clients and students each day.  To learn more - Click here

* Intervention Specialist- Canton, OH - Join a fun, flexible, team-build environment as a Virtual Intervention Specialist with Light Street Special Education Solutions, a division of Learn It Systems. Teachers must have a Special Education K-12 Cross Categorical teaching certificate. To learn more -Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Exceptional Children's Foundation (ECF) provides the highest quality services for children and adults who are challenged with developmental, learning and emotional disabilities - empowering them to reach their greatest potential. Each year, ECF serves more than 3,700 clients and their families at 15 sites throughout Los Angeles County. To learn more -Click here

Food For Thought..........

Try to be a rainbow in someone's cloud.
Maya Angelou
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