Week in Review - November 27, 2015

WEEK IN REVIEW

New NASET Publications and Articles of Interest in Special Education and Disabilities That Were Reported This Week

November 27, 2015 - Vol 11, Issue 47


 

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In This Issue

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK


Dear NASET News,

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW Here, we provide you with the latest publications from NASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW atnews@naset.org. Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,


NASET News Team

NASET Sponsor - Antioch University

 


New This Week on NASET

NASET's Bullying of Children Series Issue #8

Bullying Exerts Psychiatric Effects into Adulthood

Once considered a childhood rite of passage, bullying lingers well into adulthood. Bullies and victims alike are at risk for psychiatric problems such as anxiety, depression, substance abuse, and suicide when they become adults, reported a study partially funded by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). This issue of NASET's Bullying of Children series comes from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and focuses on research done on the lingering effects of bullying into adulthood. In the study examined, compared to those who went through childhood unscathed, victims had four times the prevalence of agoraphobia, generalized anxiety, and panic disorder when they became adults. Overall, bullies had four times the risk of developing antisocial personality disorder. These disorders still stood even after other factors were taken into account, such as preexisting psychiatric problems or family hardships. Bully-victims fared the worst. Also known as "loners," these individuals start out with less developed social skills and are seen as more impulsive and aggressive. When picked on, they respond by picking on others. Their numbers, compared to those never involved in bullying, tell the story: 14 times the risk of panic disorder, 5 times the risk of depressive disorders, and 10 times the risk of suicidal thoughts and behavior.

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CDC: Child Autism Rate Now 1 in 45 After Survey Method Changes

About one in 45 children has an autism spectrum disorder, according to a new U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention survey of parents. This apparent increase is likely due to a change of questions parents were asked about their child, the study authors said. "Probably the most important finding of this paper, which is hardly new, is that how one asks a question matters," said Dr. Glen Elliott, chief psychiatrist and medical director of Children's Health Council in Palo Alto, Calif. "The CDC spends considerable time appropriately emphasizing that the total number of individuals in the three categories covered -- intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorders and developmental disability -- has not changed," Elliott explained. He added that what did change was the distribution among those groups. To read more, click here
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NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

Feds: IEPs Should Align With Grade-Level Standards

Beyond offering a free appropriate public education, individualized education programs for students with disabilities should meet grade-level requirements, federal education officials say. In guidance released Tuesday, the U.S. Department of Education said that all IEPs should conform to "the state's academic content standards for the grade in which the child is enrolled." The directive comes ahead of the 40th anniversary of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act - the federal law requiring appropriate school services for children with disabilities - later this month. To read more, click here

NASET Members Only

Potential Treatment for a Serious Respiratory Infection in Kids

An experimental drug shows promise as a treatment for a common and potentially serious illness known as respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Currently, there is no treatment or vaccine for RSV, which can be deadly for infants and the elderly. Kids are nine times more likely to die from this virus than from flu, the investigative team pointed out. The drug, dubbed ALS-008176 for now, was tested in a group of adults infected with RSV. It reduced the amount of virus and improved their symptoms, the researchers said. To read more, click here

For Many With Disabilities, Freedom To Be Intimate Is Rare

Near sunset, Rachel Larson grabbed Nicholas Hamilton by the hand and pulled him down a steep embankment below a graffiti-covered bridge. With late-summer mosquitoes buzzing around them, the two giggled and caressed each other, their voices muffled by the rush of a nearby stream and the traffic above. "It's our secret hideaway," said Rachel, 21, who has Down syndrome, as she snuggled with Nicholas, 24, who has a developmental disability. "Here, no one can see us, and we are free to do whatever we want." To read more, click here

NASET Sponsor - Antioch University

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Guess the answer to this week's trivia question and we'll recognize you in next week's Week in Review.

Congratulations to: Olumide Akerele, Pamela Downing-Hosten, Sue Bradley, Patsy Ray, Laura Cochran and Prahbhjot Malhi who all knew the answer to last week's trivia question: According to the latest research in the field, exposure to dogs or farm animals early in life appears to reduce a child's risk of developing a particular health impairment. Researchers looking at more than one million Swedish children found that those who grew up with dogs in the home were nearly 15 percent less likely to develop what specific health impairment than those not exposed to dogs.
ANSWER:  ASTHMA

THE TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK WILL RETURN ON DECEMBER 4, 2015

NASET Applications for iPhone & iPad

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Impartial Review of IEP App - Click here - To learn more about these Apps click on the image

Inclusion More Common At Charter Schools, Report Finds

Long derided for welcoming too few kids with disabilities, a new report finds that a growing percentage of charter school students qualify for special education. About 10.4 percent of students at charter schools have disabilities compared to 12.5 percent of those attending public schools. Children with disabilities at charters, however, are far more likely to attend classes alongside their typically-developing peers. The findings come from a report released this week by the National Center for Special Education in Charter Schools analyzing information gathered by the U.S. Department of Education in its 2011-2012 civil rights data collection. To read more, click here

Childhood Cancer Survivors May Suffer Physically, Mentally Decades Later

Childhood cancer survivors can have poor mental and physical health as adults, according to two new studies. These health problems may be related to some of the toxic medications needed to treat cancer, experts say. "We are doing a lot better at curing childhood cancers, but there are a lot of late effects of treatment that need to be looked at," said Dr. Karen Effinger, a pediatrics instructor at Stanford School of Medicine. Because they are so young when treated, children and teens with cancer are the most vulnerable to long-term effects of treatment, she noted. To read more, click here

Adolescent Bariatric Surgery Reverses Type 2 Diabetes in 95 Percent of Teens

The results of a new study published in The New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with presentation at The Obesity Society Annual meeting in Los Angeles, California show that three years after undergoing bariatric surgery, adolescents experienced major improvements in their weight, metabolic health, and quality of life. Teen-LABS (Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery), a multi-center clinical study examining the safety and health effects of surgical weight loss procedures, is the largest and most comprehensive analysis of bariatric outcomes to date in adolescents. To read more, click here

Foods May Affect Each Person's Blood Sugar Differently

New research would seem to support what many have enviously suspected while watching a thin friend chow down -- the same foods don't necessarily have the same effect from person-to-person. A new study from Israel suggests that people have very different blood sugar responses to the same food -- with some showing large spikes even after eating supposedly healthy choices. Researchers said the findings, published in the Nov. 19 issue of the journal Cell, underscore the message that there is no "one-size-fits-all" diet. To read more, click here

Meeting Transportation Needs Will Improve Lives of Those with ASD, Their Families

An integrated approach to providing access to reliable and safe transportation is needed for adults on the autism spectrum and their families, according to a new Rutgers study that offers recommendations for removing barriers to better mobility. The Rutgers report addresses transportation obstacles that those with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and other developmental disabilities, and their families, must overcome to carry out their daily activities and offers recommendations on how to remove the obstacles. Many challenges are associated with transportation, such as the inability to live independently, reach employers and health care providers and even engage in community and social activities. To read more,click here

NASET - Members Only Savings

NASET is pleased to provide our members with exclusive access to discounts on products and services. These savings are available to all current NASET members. To find out more about savings from Life Lock, Avis, Budget, Cruises Only, Orlando Vacations and more - Click here

Simulated Town Offers Life Skills Training

Kierra Saunders had already been to the bank twice to replenish her funds after decorating a tote bag for her sister, visiting the pet shop and buying herself a trinket in another store. After that whirlwind, the 15-year-old from Columbus Alternative High School grinned as she relaxed with a red snow cone in the town center. Kierra, who has a developmental disability, had navigated the nuances of LifeTown Columbus with help and advice from her volunteer mentor, Brandi Burch. To read more, click here

More Than 8 Percent of Kids With Cancer May Be Genetically Prone to the Disease

More than 8 percent of children with cancer have gene mutations that increase their risk of cancer, a new study says. The findings suggest that genetic screening might be important in all childhood cancer patients, not just those with a family history of cancer, according to the researchers with the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital-Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project. Doing so would improve the chances of detecting cancers at their earliest and most treatable stages, the researchers said. To read more, click here

Allergy and Asthma Sufferers Beware as Holiday Season Kicks In

There are a number of steps people with allergies and asthma can take to deal with the challenges they may face over the holidays, an expert says. "Two-thirds of allergy sufferers have symptoms year-round, so it's not just a matter of the first freeze hitting and your symptoms disappearing," Dr. Bryan Martin, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), said in a college news release. "Even after the pollen season dies down, there are environmental triggers to deal with -- things like mold, dust and pet dander. The winter holidays can bring a whole new set of triggers," he explained. To read more, click here
AASEP Logo

NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

More Gluten Before Age 2 Linked to Celiac Disease in At-Risk Kids

Children who eat more foods with gluten before they're 2 years old have a greater risk of developing celiac disease if they carry a genetic risk factor for the condition, new research suggests. "This finding offers insight into why some, but not all, children at genetic risk develop celiac disease," lead study author Carin Andren Aronsson, from the department of clinical sciences at Lund University in Sweden, said in a prepared statement. "Our study provides convincing evidence that the amount of gluten ingested at an early age plays a role in disease course," Aronsson added. To read more, click here

Greater Transparency Urged For College Disability Services

Amid concerns from advocates, a U.S. senator is calling on federal education officials to make information about disability services at the nation's colleges more readily available. In a letter this week, U.S. Sen. Bob Casey, D-Pa., asked the U.S. Department of Education to offer better guidance for those with disabilities and their families as they investigate postsecondary education options. "As colleges admit greater numbers of students with disabilities ... it is vital these students have transparent disability services information," Casey wrote in the letter addressed to Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and John King, who is slated to take over Duncan's job later this year. To read more, click here

Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy is a Stem Cell Disease

A new study from The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa is poised to completely change our understanding of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and pave the way for far more effective treatments. The study, published in Nature Medicine on November 16, 2015, is the first to show that Duchenne muscular dystrophy directly affects muscle stem cells. "For nearly 20 years, we've thought that the muscle weakness observed in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy is primarily due to problems in their muscle fibres, but our research shows that it is also due to intrinsic defects in the function of their muscle stem cells," said Dr. Michael Rudnicki, senior author of the study. "This completely changes our understanding of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and could eventually lead to far more effective treatments." To read more, click here

Brain Differences May Explain Why Some With Schizophrenia Hallucinate

Researchers believe they've identified brain structure differences that increase the risk of hallucinations in people with schizophrenia. "Hallucinations are very complex phenomena that are a hallmark of mental illness and, in different forms, are also quite common across the general population," said study first author Jane Garrison, from the University of Cambridge in England. "There is likely to be more than one explanation for why they arise, but this finding seems to help explain why some people experience things that are not actually real," she said in a university news release. The researchers analyzed brain scans of schizophrenia patients and people without the mental illness. They found that schizophrenia patients with hallucinations had structural differences in a certain part of the brain compared to patients who did not hallucinate and people without the disease. To read more, click here

Honor Society for Special Education Teachers

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Military Deployment Tied to Greater Odds of Child Abuse, Neglect

Young children of U.S. Army soldiers may have a higher risk of abuse or neglect during and just after a parent is deployed abroad, a new study finds. "The findings are not that surprising because a family experiences enormous stress when a soldier goes off on a deployment," said Dr. Bob Sege, a pediatrician specializing in child abuse and vice president of Health Resources in Action, in Boston. "The men and women who go off to fight for us are doing very admirable work, and it's not a surprise that it's stressful for their families," Sege said. To read more, click here

High-Tech Glasses Instead of Eye Patch for 'Lazy Eye'?

New, high-tech glasses may offer kids with "lazy eye" a hipper alternative to the traditional, dreaded eye patch, new research suggests. Fashioned to look like snazzy ski eyewear, the glasses can function as normal prescription eyeglasses -- but with a twist. They also can form a temporary LCD digital patch over one eye, mimicking the therapeutic impact of eye patches and eye drops -- the standard treatment for lazy eye (amblyopia). Investigators say the digital specs, called Amblyz, might appeal to children who often resist standard treatment. To read more, click here

NASET Membership Benefit -  Discounts for NASET Members

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Study Highlights Health Risks For Those With Autism

Researchers are warning that more attention needs to be paid to the overall health of adults with autism, with a new study finding them at greater risk for a host of maladies. Adults on the spectrum have higher rates of health conditions ranging from seizure disorders and depression to hypertension, high cholesterol, allergies and anxiety, according to findings  published recently in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. "Although it has been extensively studied in children, little is known about health conditions in adults with autism," said Robert Fortuna, an assistant professor of medicine and pediatrics in primary care at the University of Rochester Medical Center, who led the study. "Greater awareness is needed to ensure that adults with autism are treated for conditions that are more prevalent with autism as well as conditions that are commonly encountered with advancing age." To read more, click here

jobsNASET's Latest Job Listings

* Teacher and Program Advisor - Al Akhawayn School in Ifrane, Morocco (ASI), is starting a unique project of establishing a Special Educational Needs unit for deaf children using American Sign Language, and it is searching for a SEN professional with the right level of expertise and professional experience in the education of deaf/hard of hearing children to help launch and oversee the project. To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Teacher - ChanceLight is currently hiring Special Education Teachers in the Northern California region. ChanceLight™ Behavioral Health & Education is the nation's leading provider of behavioral health and education solutions for children and young adults. Formerly known as Educational Services of America (ESA), ChanceLight serves more than 13,500 clients and students each day.  To learn more - Click here

* Intervention Specialist- Canton, OH - Join a fun, flexible, team-build environment as a Virtual Intervention Specialist with Light Street Special Education Solutions, a division of Learn It Systems. Teachers must have a Special Education K-12 Cross Categorical teaching certificate. To learn more -Click here

* Special Education Teacher- Chicago, IL - Join a fun, flexible, team-build environment as a Virtual Intervention Specialist with Light Street Special Education Solutions, a division of Learn It Systems. To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Exceptional Children's Foundation (ECF) provides the highest quality services for children and adults who are challenged with developmental, learning and emotional disabilities - empowering them to reach their greatest potential. Each year, ECF serves more than 3,700 clients and their families at 15 sites throughout Los Angeles County. To learn more -Click here

* Special Education Teacher - New Visions is seeking a Special Education Teacher to provide instructional supports and accommodations for students with disabilities, be able to write and monitor Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) in compliance with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and communicate regularly with Committee on Special Education (CSE) in your district and families of students with disabilities. To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Teacher (Elementary/Middle) - Excel Academy Public Charter School is seeking a Special Education Teacher to work with our Middle School Girls. A teacher at Excel is directly accountable to the Principal for student academic success, maintenance of rigorous school culture, and mission advancement. To learn more - Click here

*Special Education Teacher - Are you a Special Education Teacher or a Resource Specialist? Or even a Speech-Language Pathologist? Progressus Therapy has a position for you in the Concord area of CA.  Join a team of professionals working towards positive outcomes for students. To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Are you a Special Education Teacher or a Resource Specialist?  Progressus Therapy has a position for you in the Philly area of PA.  Join a team of professionals working towards positive outcomes for students. To learn more - Click here

Food For Thought..........

Gratitude is the inward feeling of kindness received. Thankfulness is the natural impulse to express that feeling. Thanksgiving is the following of that impulse.
Henry Van Dyke