Week in Review - August 21, 2015

WEEK IN REVIEW

New NASET Publications and Articles of Interest in Special Education and Disabilities That Were Reported This Week

August 21, 2015 - Vol 11, Issue 34


 

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In This Issue

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK


Dear NASET News,

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW Here, we provide you with the latest publications from NASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about theWEEK in REVIEW at news@naset.org. Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,


NASET News Team

OMEGA GAMMA CHI

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Honor Society for Special Education Teachers

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New This Week on NASET

NASET's HOW TO Series - Issue #28A

How To Identify Children with Attention Deficit Disorder in your Classroom

Introduction
Accurate and early diagnosis is crucial for the child with Attention Deficit Disorder. This will facilitate a treatment plan and reduce the chances of secondary problems. Follow the checklist below if you think the child in your room may have Attention Deficit Disorder. Compare the child's behavior to the following list of symptoms...


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NASET's HOW TO Series - Issue #28B

How To Foster Resiliency, Perseverance and a Sense of Accomplishment in your Students
Introduction
Confident children seem to share certain characteristics. In their relationships with both teachers and parents, they show in many ways that they are empowered, hopeful, autonomous, resilient, and secure. They are also accomplished, receive recognition for their accomplishments, and persevere even when things don't go as they would like. Finally, for the most part they genuinely seem to enjoy life, both at school and at home. The ideas described here, if practiced in the classroom, will help students enjoy the environment they are in and believe in themselves as they never have before. The building of confidence in your students should be a process rather than a hit and miss approach. The following suggestions will enhance the factors in the human condition that lead to a sense of self-worth and overall confidence.
Remember, confidence is based on actual successful experiences, not just telling a student that he or she is intelligent, creative etc. so providing these opportunities will be crucial. The main goals in building confidence are to provide tasks and an environment that results in sense of completion and a sense of accomplishment.

To read or download this issue - Click here (login required)

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See NASET's Latest Job Listings

Music Therapy Might Help People With Epilepsy

Music therapy might someday help people with epilepsy, a new study suggests. About 80 percent of epilepsy patients have temporal lobe epilepsy, in which seizures originate in the temporal lobe of the brain. Music is processed in the auditory cortex, located in the same region of the brain, which is why researchers from Ohio State University's Wexner Medical Center wanted to study the connection. The study authors said that the brains of epilepsy patients appear to react to music differently from the brains of people without the disorder. "We believe that music could potentially be used as an intervention to help people with epilepsy," Christine Charyton, adjunct assistant professor and visiting assistant professor of neurology, said in an American Psychological Association (APA) news release. Charyton plans to present the research Sunday at the APA's annual meeting in Toronto. To read more, click here
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NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Education establishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

State Officials Plan For New ABLE Accounts

State treasurers from across the country are meeting in Chicago this week to discuss how to implement a tax-exempt plan to help families cover the expenses of people with disabilities. The new ABLE accounts, which stands for Achieving a Better Life Experience, will operate much like 529 college savings plans in that the growth is federal tax-free and families are allowed to withdraw money for qualified expenses tax-free. "This is not just an Illinois issue," the state's Treasurer Michael Frerichs said at a Thursday morning news conference in Chicago's Thompson Center. "ABLE accounts could benefit hundreds of thousands of people across the country." To read more, click here

Scientists May Have Found 'Marker' for Schizophrenia

Brain irregularities are present before a person develops schizophrenia, researchers report. In previous work, the Yale University researchers found that schizophrenia was linked with significant changes in connections between the thalamus and the frontal cortex. The thalamus is a major relay system in the brain, and the frontal cortex is involved in higher-level thinking. In this new study, the researchers found that these changes are already present before schizophrenia, a serious mental illness, is diagnosed. The findings offer a potential marker for the disease that affects 1 percent of people worldwide, the researchers said. To read more, click here

Labor Department Says More With Disabilities Unemployed

An increasing number of Americans with disabilities are job hunting, new government data suggests. The unemployment rate for people with disabilities ticked up last month to 10.4 percent, a rise over the 9.3 percent jobless rate reported the month prior, the U.S. Department of Labor said Friday. Meanwhile, the economy as a whole added 215,000 jobs in July and the unemployment rate for the general population remained steady at 5.3 percent, according to the Labor Department. Despite the month-to-month dip in employment among people with disabilities, figures for July reflect an improvement over the same period last year when unemployment for this population was at 12.1 percent. To read more, click here

NASET Members Only

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Guess the answer to this week's trivia question and we'll recognize you in next week's Week in Review.
Congratulations to: Kimberly Rehbaum, Heather Chapman, Helena Fields, Olivia Strozier,  Amy J. Klinch, Helene Fitzpatrick, Laurine Kennedy, Wanda Routier, Pamela Downing-Hosten, Meredith Martin, Jenn Vallot, Olumide Akerele, Marilyn Haile and Ellen Tannebaum
who all knew the answer to last week's trivia question:

Last month, Zion Harvey, 8, a young boy from Baltimore, had a medical procedure done; it was the first one in the world performed on a child, following 10 hours of surgery by a 40-person team at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.  What did Zion Harvey receive? ANSWER:  A Double Hand Transplant
THIS WEEK'S TRIVIA QUESTION:
Which state recently became the first to enact into law the requirement of video cameras in some special education classrooms?  (Note: The law in this state says school districts must install cameras in special education classrooms if parents, teachers or school staffers request them. The law also requires that parents be allowed to view the videos.)
If you know the answer, send an email to contactus@naset.org
All answers must be submitted no later than Monday, August 24, 2015 at 12:00 p.m.

Screen Teens With Depression for Heart Disease, Experts Say

Teens with major depression or bipolar disorder may face a higher risk for heart disease and they need to be followed closely, new recommendations from the American Heart Association state. "Youth with mood disorders are not yet widely recognized as a group at increased risk for excessive and early heart disease. We hope these guidelines will spur action from patients, families and health care providers to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease among these youth," Dr. Benjamin Goldstein, a child-adolescent psychiatrist at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center at the University of Toronto, said in a heart association news release. To read more, click here

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Impartial Review of IEP App - Click here - To learn more about these Apps click on the image

Anticipation High Ahead Of Special Ed Camera Mandate

Texas special education advocates say a new law requiring video cameras in some classrooms will protect those students most at risk of being abused. The law says school districts must install cameras in special education classrooms if parents, teachers or school staffers request them. The law also requires that parents be allowed to view the videos. School officials worry that the law passed this spring - believed to be the first in the nation - will require districts to spend millions without the state providing additional dollars. But special education advocates say the need to protect these students had gone unaddressed for too long. To read more, click here

Some Babies May Pick Up 2nd Language More Easily

A certain type of social behavior helps babies learn a second language, a new small study suggests. Researchers found that babies who engaged in more "gaze shifting" during sessions with a tutor showed increased brain response that indicates language learning. In gaze shifting, an infant makes eye contact and then looks at the same object that the other person is looking at. It's one of the earliest types of social skills in babies, the researchers said. The study included 17 infants, about 10 months old, from English-speaking homes. Over four weeks, they attended a dozen 25-minute Spanish language tutoring sessions. During the sessions, the tutors read books to, and talked and played with, the infants in Spanish. To read more, click here

Missing Piece Surfaces in the Puzzle of Autism

A new gene that plays a crucial role during early development in humans and whose under-expression may induce certain autistic traits has been uncovered by scientists. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie autism spectrum disorders (ASD), which affect 7.6 million people is a major challenge. Characterized by heterogeneous symptoms and a multifactorial origin, this complex condition evolves during brain development. The scientists thus chose to study adult olfactory stem cells as indicators of the early stages of ontogenesis in order to determine new genes involved in this disease. To read more, click here

Lyme Disease in U.S. Is Under-Reported, CDC Says

Lyme disease may be grossly under-reported in the United States. Government researchers say the tick-borne infection affects about 10 times as many Americans as previously indicated by confirmed case reports. About 329,000 cases of Lyme disease occur every year, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found in their analysis of a nationwide health insurance claims database for 2005 through 2010. That's much higher than the 30,000 confirmed and probable Lyme cases reported to the CDC in 2010. But it tracks fairly well with a previous CDC estimate of about 300,000 Lyme disease cases annually, said lead author Dr. Christina Nelson, a medical epidemiologist with the CDC's division of vector-borne disease. To read more, click here

NASET - Members Only Savings

NASET is pleased to provide our members with exclusive access to discounts on products and services. These savings are available to all current NASET members. To find out more about savings from Life Lock, Avis, Budget, Cruises Only, Orlando Vacations and more - Click here

Storytelling Skills Support Early Literacy for African American Children

Early narrative skills are tied to kindergarten literacy among young African American children, according to new research from the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute (FPG). The study is the first to demonstrate the connection between African American preschoolers' storytelling abilities and the development of their early reading skills. "Previous research found an association between oral narratives and literacy at later stages of development," said FPG researcher Nicole Gardner-Neblett, who led the study. "But our findings suggest how important storytelling is for African American children at the earliest stages." To read more, click here

Parents of Kids With Diabetes Need to Plan for School Days

Parents of children with diabetes need to plan how their child's condition will be managed while at school, experts say. "Diabetes is a disease that must be managed 24/7. Failure to do so can result in serious short- and long-term medical complications," Linda Siminerio, a certified diabetes educator and co-chair of the American Diabetes Association Safe at School Working Group, said in an association news release. "It's therefore imperative that every student with diabetes has a plan in place to meet their diabetes needs at school as well as off-site, during field trips and at all school-sponsored activities," she said. To read more, click here

'Visual Bucket List': Girl With Usher Syndrome Is Slowly Going Blind, So Parents Created List Of Things They Want Her To See

People take sight for granted. It allows us to see the world, watch TV, read a book, or spy on distant galaxies. Imagine if you were on the verge of losing your sight. What would be on your bucket list of things to see before the world went black? For one 5-year-old girl, that bucket list has become an unfortunate necessity. Elizabeth "Lizzy" Myers has Usher syndrome type 2, a rare genetic disorder characterized by hearing and progressive vision loss that can result in blindness. She has about five to seven years until she loses nearly all of her vision, so her parents decided to take her out and see theworld. They started by bringing her to the local sights of her hometown, Bellville, Ohio. But once her story was run in the Mansfield News Journal, people started pitching in to help Lizzy and her family take their visual bucket list on the road. Up next, they want to stop and watch the waterfalls at Niagara Falls, see the splendor of the Grand Canyon, stare up in awe at the Northern Lights, and countdown at Old Faithful in Yellowstone Park. To read more, click here

Social Skills Program for Young Adults With Autism Shows Promise

A special program for adolescents and young adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) improved their social skills, a new study finds. Because autism research tends to focus on therapies for younger children, the study's attention to this older age group is unusual, said lead author and program founder Elizabeth Laugeson, an assistant clinical professor at the University of California, Los Angeles. "But the reality is these kids grow up and social demands change, and we are not keeping up with these demands," she noted. To read more, click here

What Works Best to Curb a Preschooler's Bad Behaviors?

Parents should be open to using a range of tactics for managing their preschoolers' behavior problems -- including "time-outs," a set of new studies suggests. When it comes to disciplining young children, there are two broad camps. Some popular advice books and websites emphasize "positive parenting," where time-outs and other punishments are discouraged. But if parents were to read a child psychology textbook, they'd find that time-outs are considered an effective tactic, said Robert Larzelere, a professor of human development and family science at Oklahoma State University. To read more, click here
AASEP Logo

NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

Why Schools Over-Discipline Children With Disabilities

A quarter-century ago, on July 26, 1990, Congress passed the Americans with Disabilities Act to give people with disabilities equal access to services like public education. But the rate at which special-needs students are disciplined raises questions about how equal that access truly is. In public schools today, children with disabilities are far more likely than their classmates to be disciplined, removed from the classroom, suspended, and even expelled. A report by UCLA's Civil Rights Project released earlier this year found that just over 5 percent of elementary-school children with disabilities were suspended during the 2011-12 school year, more than double the overall suspension rate. Among secondary-school students, 18 percent of kids with disabilities were suspended, versus 10 percent overall. Even more striking, a third of all K-12 children with emotional disabilities-such as anxiety or obsessive compulsive disorder-were suspended at least once, according to Daniel Losen, the lead author of the UCLA report. To read more, click here

Exercise May Help Kids With Multiple Sclerosis

Children with multiple sclerosis (MS) who exercise have less disease activity than those who don't, researchers report. "The study is a first look, so we can't draw any definitive conclusion from it," said study author Dr. E. Ann Yeh, director of the pediatric MS and neuroinflammatory program at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. "What we saw suggests there might be a relationship between being more active and the degree of disease activity one might have with MS." The study found an association, she said, but it wasn't designed to prove a cause-and-effect relationship. To read more, click here

Kindergarten Boys Less Interested in Language Activities, Study Indicates

A Norwegian study of kindergarten children reveals that girls are more interested in language activities than boys. As a result boys may receive less linguistic stimulation and become less prepared for school than girls. It is well known that girls develop language skills earlier than boys. A study from the Norwegian Reading Centre at the University of Stavanger also reveals that kindergarten-age girls are more interested in reading and other activities that promote linguistic awareness. "This is thought-provoking. When boys participate less in language activities, there is a danger that they lose out on important linguistic stimulation that promotes key language skills as they start learning to read. They may also miss out on the positive experiences of reading that girls get," says Elisabeth Brekke Stangeland, Ph.D. Candidate at the Reading Centre at the University of Stavanger. To read more, click here

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Kids, Teens Win When Mental Health Providers Team with Family Doctors

For the past decade, cutting-edge health care providers and researchers have increasingly pushed to integrate care for mental health and substance use problems within primary medical care for children and adolescents. Their hope is that children and teens who suffer from mental and behavioral disorders would fare better if their pediatricians or family doctors took an active role in linking them with mental health care, particularly when these doctors team up with mental health clinicians to help meet the needs of their young patients. Now, a team of UCLA researchers has studied a wide range of published research on the approach and found that children and adolescents who receive integrated mental health and medical treatment are 66 percent more likely to have a good outcome than those who receive more traditional primary care. To read more, click here

jobsNASET's Latest Job Listings

* Early Childhood Special Educator- Magnum Medical has an opening for an Early Childhood Special Educator to work with children of American military families stationed at Aviano AFB in Italy. To learn more - Click here

* Teacher for the Visually Impaired - The teacher assigned to the visually impaired is primarily responsible for providing itinerant and site-based instruction to students K-12 with visual disabilities. To learn more - Click here

* Mild/Moderate Teacher/Educational Specialist - The Educational Specialist will be working with transitional aged students both in and out of jail. Students range from 17 - 22 years of age, with older adults possibly being served through 504 plans in the future. To learn more - Click here

* Millwaukee, WI - Are You An Amazing Special Education Teacher? -Therapia Staffing wants you to know that "At the heart of all we do, is YOU". We specialize in contract staffing opportunities across the country. To learn more -Click here

* Selah, WA - Are You An Amazing Special Education Teacher? - Therapia Staffing wants you to know that "At the heart of all we do, is YOU". We specialize in contract staffing opportunities across the country. To learn more -Click here

* Lottsburg, VA - Are You An Amazing Special Education Teacher? - Therapia Staffing wants you to know that "At the heart of all we do, is YOU". We specialize in contract staffing opportunities across the country. To learn more -Click here

* Youngstown, OH - Are You An Amazing Special Education Teacher? - Therapia Staffing wants you to know that "At the heart of all we do, is YOU". We specialize in contract staffing opportunities across the country. To learn more -Click here

* San Jose, CA - Are You An Amazing Special Education Teacher? - Therapia Staffing wants you to know that "At the heart of all we do, is YOU". We specialize in contract staffing opportunities across the country. To learn more -Click here

* Oracle, AZ - Are You An Amazing Special Education Teacher? - Therapia Staffing wants you to know that "At the heart of all we do, is YOU". We specialize in contract staffing opportunities across the country. To learn more -Click here

* Oakland/Richmond, CA - Are You An Amazing Special Education Teacher? - Therapia Staffing wants you to know that "At the heart of all we do, is YOU". We specialize in contract staffing opportunities across the country. To learn more -Click here

* Learning Specialist - Provide Special Education students with learning activities and experiences designed to help them fulfill their potential for intellectual, emotional, physical, and social growth. To learn more - Click here

* Teachers of Special Education - The Randolph County School System is seeking Special Education teachers at all levels K-12. The Special Education teacher will develop and implement effective instructional practices based on students' needs. To learn more - Click here

* Cross Categorical Special Education Teacher - Join our professional team of educators and therapists, providing the individualized attention required for students with special needs in a therapeutic school environment. You'll be more than a teacher--you'll be a role model for our children and adolescents. To learn more - Click here

* Certified Special Education Teacher, part-time - We are an organization of dedicated people who know how exciting and rewarding it is to help children achieve. We are eager to have people join us whose training, skills and experience add to our ability to provide successful, research based instruction, great teaching, excellent support services. To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Exceptional Children's Foundation is seeking a Special Education teacher who will provide an educational program for students who are developmentally disabled or have special needs. To learn more - click here

* Director of Student Services - The Rockland Jewish Academy is a community day school three years young, built by and for the community; independent, inclusive and welcoming to families in all streams of Judaism. To learn more -Click here

* Classroom Teacher - The Virginia Institute of Autism, a Charlottesville nonprofit helping people overcome the challenges of autism, is currently seeking Classroom Teacher for its James C. Hormel School program. To learn more - Click here

* Instructor - The Virginia Institute of Autism is currently seeking Instructors for its James C. Hormel School program.  Instructors must have a love for children, dedication to teaching, patience, and have the desire to change lives. To learn more - Click here

* Teachers of Special Education - The special education teacher's function is to develop and implement effective instructional practices based on the needs identified in students' Individualized Education Programs (IEPs).  The teacher will develop, implement and monitor the students' Individualized Education Programs in collaboration with parents and other IEP Team members. To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Teachers - Provide students with appropriate learning activities and experiences in the core academic subject area assigned to help them fulfill their potential for intellectual, emotional, physical, and social growth. To learn more - Click here

Food For Thought..........

Learning never exhausts the mind

Leonardo da Vinci

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