Week in Review - August 14, 2015

NASET

WEEK IN REVIEW

New NASET Publications and Articles of Interest in Special Education and Disabilities That Were Reported This Week

August 14, 2015 - Vol 11, Issue 33

 

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In This Issue
TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK
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Dear NASET News,

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW Here, we provide you with the latest publications from NASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about theWEEK in REVIEW at news@naset.org. Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,


NASET News Team

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New This Week on NASET

RTI Roundtable - Issue #15

The Perspective of K-12 Stakeholders Involved in Early Implementation of Response to Intervention (RTI)
By
Nai-Cheng Kuo, Ph.D.
Department of Teacher Education
Georgia Regents University

This issue of NASET's RTI Roundtable was written by Nai-Cheng Kuo, Ph.D. from Georgia Regents University. Response to intervention (RTI) is an approach that has been implemented in more than 90% of the states in the U.S. The purpose of the study is to advance understanding of what efforts need to be made in order to increase the likelihood that special education professionals will accept RTI. Data used in this study include individual interviews with two principals, three special education teachers (two of whom were school district RTI coaches), one social worker, and one Title I teacher across four K-12 schools. Data were collected and analyzed around four sets of what qualitative methodologists call "grand tour" questions (Bernard, 2001): (1) respondents' perceptions about data-based decision making, (2) use of evidence-based interventions at each tier, (3) strengths and challenges to achieving effective coordination, and (4) ongoing supports and professional development needs. The participants' perspectives offer critical information to advance both research and practices related to RTI.



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Bullying of Children Series Issue #7

Bullying and Teasing of Youth with Disabilities: Creating Positive School Environments for Effective Inclusion
By John Hoover and Pam Stenhjem


This issue of NASET's Bullying series was written by John Hoover and Pam Stenhjem over 10 years ago. We are presenting it today because so much of what was written still very much applies to our school issues today as they pertain to bullying. Bullying, harassment, and teasing within schools are not only practiced by many students, but have historically been allowed, ignored, and even modeled by adults. Bullying and teasing have been accepted by many as rites of passage for youth-a normal part of the childhood and adolescent experience. In fact, some researchers have recently wondered whether bullying may serve some purpose for society, resulting in ambivalence toward antiviolence programs (Hoover & Salk, 2003). However, the fact that youth who have been bullied, teased, and ostracized continue to use violence as a means of fighting back, indicates otherwise. The issue to be addressed is: Bullying has been proven by numerous studies to be a serious problem nationwide. Harassment of youth with disabilities in particular has been steadily increasing. Whole-school antibullying/antiviolence programs are necessary to address this problem effectively.
To read or download this issue - Click here (login required)

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Head Injury Tied to Long-Term Attention Issues in Kids

Children who suffer even mild brain injuries may experience momentary lapses in attention long after their accident, new research finds. The study of 6- to 13-year-olds found these attention lapses led to lower behavior and intelligence ratings by their parents and teachers. "Parents, teachers and doctors should be aware that attention impairment after traumatic brain injury can manifest as very short lapses in focus, causing children to be slower," said study researcher Marsh Konigs, a doctoral candidate at VU University Amsterdam in the Netherlands. This loss of focus was apparent even when scans showed no obvious brain damage, the researchers said. To read more, click here

Funding For ASD Research Trending Up

Federal funding for autism research yo-yoed in recent years, but ultimately is on the rise, a new government report finds. Between 2008 and 2012, federal dollars for autism research grew 45 percent, reaching $245 million for the 2012 fiscal year, according to the Government Accountability Office. The increase was due in part to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, a stimulus effort in response to the recession, which boosted autism dollars to over $288 million in 2010 before spending scaled back, GAO found. Collectively, 11 federal agencies doled out nearly $1.2 billion in funding for autism research between 2008 and 2012. The vast majority came from the National Institutes of Health. To read more, click here

U.S. Infant Deaths At Lowest Rate Ever: CDC

The number of U.S. infants who die before their first birthday continues to decline and is at a historic low, health officials reported Thursday. Between 2012 and 2013, the rate dropped only slightly, from 5.98 deaths per 1,000 births to 5.96. But that's part of a long-term trend: Since 2005, when infant mortality stood at 6.86 per 1,000 births, the rate has fallen by 13 percent, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Every single time an infant dies in the first year of life it is a tragedy for a family," said report author T.J. Mathews, a demographer at CDC's National Center for Health Statistics. To read more, click here

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NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

Anticipation High Ahead Of Special Ed Camera Mandate

Texas special education advocates say a new law requiring video cameras in some classrooms will protect those students most at risk of being abused. The law says school districts must install cameras in special education classrooms if parents, teachers or school staffers request them. The law also requires that parents be allowed to view the videos. School officials worry that the law passed this spring - believed to be the first in the nation - will require districts to spend millions without the state providing additional dollars. But special education advocates say the need to protect these students had gone unaddressed for too long. To read more, click here

NASET Members Only

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Guess the answer to this week's trivia question and we'll recognize you in next week's Week in Review.

Congratulations to Sue Bradley, Marilyn Haile, Pamela Downing-Hosten, Olumide Akerele and Rena Root who knew the answer to last week's trivia question:  According to the latest research out of the University of Montreal, for young children, the number of hours spent watching TV at the age of 29 months correlates to the likelihood that what will happen to them in sixth grade?
ANSWER:  Being Bullied

THIS WEEK'S TRIVIA QUESTION:
Last month, Zion Harvey, 8, a young boy from Baltimore, had a medical procedure done; it was the first one in the world performed on a child, following 10 hours of surgery by a 40-person team at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.  What did Zion Harvey receive?

If you know the answer, send an email to contactus@naset.org
All answers must be submitted no later than Monday, August 17, 2015 at 12:00 p.m.

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Active As Teen, Free of Diabetes In Later Life?

High levels of physical activity during the early teen years might reduce the risk of diabetes later in life, a new study suggests. The research included 300 children who were checked for insulin resistance every year from ages 9 to 16. Insulin resistance is a condition that leads to high blood sugar and is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. At age 13, insulin resistance was 17 percent lower among more physically active youngsters than among those who were less active. However, this difference decreased over the next three years and was gone by age 16. To read more, click here

After 25 Years Of ADA, Workplace Struggles Remain

In elementary school, Erik Anders was told he would never be able to hold down a job or live on his own. "I was told I would never be able to live like a normal person," said Anders, 28, who has Asperger's syndrome and now works for a Baltimore-area window maker and rents his own apartment. "I was able to prove some people wrong. ... I'm independent, and a lot of people with disabilities can work on their own." The employee of Acadia Windows and Doors, who installs glass in window sashes and operates machinery, finds himself in the minority as a person with a disability. Only 17 percent of those with disabilities were employed last year; another 12 percent actively sought employment but were unsuccessful. Anders and other advocates say discrimination still persists a quarter-century after landmark civil rights legislation guaranteed equal access for people with disabilities. To read more, click here

Boy, Girl Newborns Show Spinal Differences: Study

The spines of boys and girls aren't the same size at birth, a new study shows. Researchers suspect this difference is probably due to an evolutionary adaptation that allows females' spines to cope with the added weight they carry during pregnancy. The researchers used MRIs to measure the small bones that form the spine (vertebrae) in 70 healthy, full-term male and female newborns. The diameter of cross sections of the vertebrae -- a key factor in the strength of these bones -- were an average of 11 percent smaller in girls than boys, the study revealed. To read more, click here

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Tech Innovators Honored For Helping Those With Special Needs

In an often self-absorbed Silicon Valley, where startups are sometimes accused of obsessing on petty first-world problems instead of making the world a better place, several Bay Area entrepreneurs were honored this week in New York City for doing the latter. One created an app that helps people who are hard-of-hearing track multiple voices in a conversation. Another came up with a wearable device that literally speaks for people with cognitive and communicative disabilities. And the third project uses iBeacon technology that allows those who with visual impairment to navigate public areas. To read more, click here

Weight Loss Surgery May Boost Teens' Mental Health

Weight loss surgery may improve obese teens' mental health, a new study finds. The research included 88 severely obese Swedish teens who had the weight-loss surgery known as gastric bypass. They were between the ages of 13 and 18. Researchers followed up with the teens for two years after the procedure. "Most young people felt significantly better two years after surgery. On average, they felt like most other adolescents, so their mental health had been normalized," study author Kajsa Jarvholm, a researcher and psychologist at Lund University in Sweden, said in a university news release. To read more, click here

NASET - Members Only Savings

NASET is pleased to provide our members with exclusive access to discounts on products and services. These savings are available to all current NASET members. To find out more about savings from Life Lock, Avis, Budget, Cruises Only, Orlando Vacations and more - Click here

Kids' Hemophilia Drugs a Big Part of State Medicaid Spending

Treatment costs for one childhood illness, hemophilia, may use up a big chunk of a state's Medicaid budget, a new study out of California shows. The researchers found that treatments for hemophilia -- a rare, inherited disorder in which blood does not clot normally -- accounted for the largest share of spending on outpatient drugs among publicly insured children in California with serious chronic illnesses. The study "underscores the potential effect of new, expensive but [effective] pharmaceuticals on public insurance programs for children with chronic illness," wrote a group led by Sonja Swenson of Stanford University. To read more, click here

Brain Scans Show Why Reading to Kids Is Good for Them

Brain scans reveal that preschoolers whose parents read to them regularly show more activity in key areas of their brains. Reading to young children is well known to have benefits, including better language skills. And experts already urge parents to have a regular story time with their kids, starting at birth. It's been assumed that the habit feeds youngsters' brain development. But the new findings, published online Aug. 3 in the journal Pediatrics, offer hard evidence of that theory. "It's often said that reading builds brains," said study leader Dr. John Hutton, of Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. "That seems obvious, but you want to show that it's actually true." To read more,click here

Too Much Facebook, Twitter Tied to Poor Mental Health in Teens

Teens who frequently use social media are more likely to say they struggle with mental health concerns that are not being addressed, new Canadian research reveals. At issue is the amount of time adolescents spend browsing and posting on sites such as Facebook, Twitter or Instagram. "It is difficult to speculate what mechanisms may link the use of social networking sites to mental health problems," said study author Dr. Hugues Sampasa-Kanyinga, from the department of epidemiology at Ottawa Public Health in Ottawa, Canada. To read more, click here

AASEP Logo

NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

Liquid Nicotine From E-Cigs Poses Poison Danger to Kids

Nicotine poisoning is a growing concern for American children, but proposed U.S. federal government regulations alone aren't enough to solve the problem, an expert says. The increasing popularity of electronic cigarettes has led to a number of cases of nicotine poisoning in recent years, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration hopes to require warning labels and child-resistant packaging on liquid nicotine products, such as those used in e-cigarettes. Even a small amount of liquid nicotine can be lethal, Jonathan Foulds, a professor of public health sciences at Penn State College of Medicine, said in a university news release. To read more, click here

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Positive Reinforcement Plays Key Role in Cognitive Task Performance in Children with ADHD

A little recognition for a job well done means a lot to children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) -- more so than it would for typically developing kids. That praise, or other possible reward, improves the performance of children with ADHD on certain cognitive tasks, but until a recent study led by researchers from the University at Buffalo, it wasn't clear if that result was due to heightened motivation inspired by positive reinforcement or because those with ADHD simply had greater room for improvement at certain tasks relative to their peers without such a diagnosis. To read more, click here

Severe 'Picky Eating' May Point to Mental Health Issues in Kids

A kid who is a seriously "picky eater" is also likely to struggle with emotional problems like anxiety and depression, new research suggests. About 3 percent of kids suffer from severe selective eating, to the extent that they can't eat out at a restaurant, said lead researcher Nancy Zucker, an eating disorders specialist at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C. These kids are more than twice as likely to be diagnosed with depression or social anxiety, when compared with kids who'll eat anything, according to findings published online Aug. 3 in the journal Pediatrics. To read more, click here

Honor Society for Special Education Teachers

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Young Adults with Autism Show Improved Social Function Following Skills Program

Researchers at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA have found that a social skills program for high-functioning young adults with autism spectrum disorder significantly improved the participants' ability to engage with their peers. In the study, the largest randomized controlled trial to show improved social functioning in young adults with autism, the participants' advances continued to be seen 16 weeks after the program's conclusion, and were even augmented by other improvements such as increased empathy and greater responsibility. To read more, click here

Noninvasive Stimulation Gets Legs Moving After Spinal Cord Injury

A noninvasive procedure might help people with paralysis move their legs without the need for surgery or implanted devices, new research suggests. The treatment approach is called transcutaneous stimulation, where a device delivers an electrical current to the spine through electrodes placed on the outside of the lower back. In a recent trial of the device, five paralyzed men were able to generate steplike movements. The men didn't walk, but moved while their legs were suspended in braces hung from the ceiling. This enabled them to move without resistance from gravity. To read more, click here

Government Panel Questions Universal Autism Screening

With autism rates rising, experts have pushed for years to expand screening for the developmental disorder to all children. But now an influential government panel is saying not so fast. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force issued a draft proposal Monday saying that there is too little evidence to support autism screening for every child. "The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in children for whom no concerns of ASD have been raised by their parents or clinical provider," the panel said in a statement. To read more, click here

jobsNASET's Latest Job Listings

* Teacher for the Visually Impaired - The teacher assigned to the visually impaired is primarily responsible for providing itinerant and site-based instruction to students K-12 with visual disabilities. To learn more - Click here

* Mild/Moderate Teacher/Educational Specialist - The Educational Specialist will be working with transitional aged students both in and out of jail. Students range from 17 - 22 years of age, with older adults possibly being served through 504 plans in the future. To learn more - Click here

* Millwaukee, WI - Are You An Amazing Special Education Teacher? -Therapia Staffing wants you to know that "At the heart of all we do, is YOU". We specialize in contract staffing opportunities across the country. To learn more -Click here

* Selah, WA - Are You An Amazing Special Education Teacher? - Therapia Staffing wants you to know that "At the heart of all we do, is YOU". We specialize in contract staffing opportunities across the country. To learn more -Click here

* Lottsburg, VA - Are You An Amazing Special Education Teacher? - Therapia Staffing wants you to know that "At the heart of all we do, is YOU". We specialize in contract staffing opportunities across the country. To learn more -Click here

* Youngstown, OH - Are You An Amazing Special Education Teacher? - Therapia Staffing wants you to know that "At the heart of all we do, is YOU". We specialize in contract staffing opportunities across the country. To learn more -Click here

* San Jose, CA - Are You An Amazing Special Education Teacher? - Therapia Staffing wants you to know that "At the heart of all we do, is YOU". We specialize in contract staffing opportunities across the country. To learn more -Click here

* Oracle, AZ - Are You An Amazing Special Education Teacher? - Therapia Staffing wants you to know that "At the heart of all we do, is YOU". We specialize in contract staffing opportunities across the country. To learn more -Click here

* Oakland/Richmond, CA - Are You An Amazing Special Education Teacher? - Therapia Staffing wants you to know that "At the heart of all we do, is YOU". We specialize in contract staffing opportunities across the country. To learn more -Click here

* Learning Specialist - Provide Special Education students with learning activities and experiences designed to help them fulfill their potential for intellectual, emotional, physical, and social growth. To learn more - Click here

* Teachers of Special Education - The Randolph County School System is seeking Special Education teachers at all levels K-12. The Special Education teacher will develop and implement effective instructional practices based on students' needs. To learn more - Click here

* Cross Categorical Special Education Teacher - Join our professional team of educators and therapists, providing the individualized attention required for students with special needs in a therapeutic school environment. You'll be more than a teacher--you'll be a role model for our children and adolescents. To learn more - Click here

* Certified Special Education Teacher, part-time - We are an organization of dedicated people who know how exciting and rewarding it is to help children achieve. We are eager to have people join us whose training, skills and experience add to our ability to provide successful, research based instruction, great teaching, excellent support services. To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Exceptional Children's Foundation is eeking a Special Educaation teacher who will provide an educational program for students who are developmentally disabled or have special needs. To learn more - click here

* Director of Special Education -Belton Independent School District seeks a Director of Special Education to provide sound educational programs for children who are eligible for special education programs. To learn more - Click Here

* Director of Student Services - The Rockland Jewish Academy is a community day school three years young, built by and for the community; independent, inclusive and welcoming to families in all streams of Judaism. To learn more -Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Aspen School District in Aspen, Colorado seeks a Special Education Generalist to begin duties August 19, 2015. To learn more - Click here

* Special Ed Teacher Needed! - MTC is a leading provider of school-age and early intervention services in speech-language pathology, occupational therapy, physical therapy, school psychologist and special education teachers. To learn more - Click here

* Special Ed Teacher Needed! - Come join our growing team! In need of Special Ed Teachers in Santa Rosa, CA. School-based and full time! To learn more - Click here

* Classroom Teacher - The Virginia Institute of Autism, a Charlottesville nonprofit helping people overcome the challenges of autism, is currently seeking Classroom Teacher for its James C. Hormel School program. To learn more - Click here

* Instructor - The Virginia Institute of Autism is currently seeking Instructors for its James C. Hormel School program.  Instructors must have a love for children, dedication to teaching, patience, and have the desire to change lives. To learn more -
Click here

* Teachers of Special Education - The special education teacher's function is to develop and implement effective instructional practices based on the needs identified in students' Individualized Education Programs (IEPs).  The teacher will develop, implement and monitor the students' Individualized Education Programs in collaboration with parents and other IEP Team members. To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Teachers - Provide students with appropriate learning activities and experiences in the core academic subject area assigned to help them fulfill their potential for intellectual, emotional, physical, and social growth. To learn more - Click here

* Autism Case Manager and Staff Supervisor - A position is available for an autism specialist with training as a special educator, speech-language pathologist or psychologist.  To learn more- click here

Food For Thought..........

You must never be fearful about what you are doing when it is right

Rosa Parks