Week in Review - April 10, 2015

WEEK IN REVIEW

New NASET Publications and Articles of Interest in Special Education and Disabilities That Were Reported This Week

April 10, 2015 - Vol 11, Issue 15


 

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In This Issue

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK


Dear NASET News,

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW Here, we provide you with the latest publications from NASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about theWEEK in REVIEW at news@naset.org. Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,


NASET News Team

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New This Week on NASET

NASET Q&A Corner #74

What Parents Should Know Before Applying for SSI Disability Benefits for a Child

Children from birth up to age 18 may get Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. They must have a disability and they must have little or no income and resources. Children can get SSI if they meet Social Security's definition of disability for children and if they have little or no income and resources. This issue of NASET's Q & A Corner is from the Social Security Administration and answers some questions parents ask about applying for SSI for children.


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NASET LD Report #21


A Discussion of Reading Disorders: Perceptual, Cognitive and Mnemonic Elements

In some ways the very idea of a reading disorder makes little sense; particularly in light of the "all things being equal" paradigm - i.e. that reading teachers and curriculum materials are usually adequate vehicles by which to impart this skill. To some extent, this is also true with regard to neuro-developmental factors. Children with reading disorders are usually normal in every respect, which runs contrary to the global brain dysfunction hypothesis inferable from these various research and theoretical sources. In that context, assume the child has normal vision, hearing and language-associative capacities. That combination of skills should enable the child to develop the visual associative capacities needed to learn letters and words, the auditory/phonetic capacities to understand sound-symbol relationships and the linguistic ability to interpret reading passages within a communicative/grammatical framework. This issue of NASET's LD Report, written by Robert DePaolo (and reprinted with permission by Doug Goldberg from The Special Education Advisor at www.specialeducationadvisor.com/a-discussion-of-reading-disorders-perceptual-cognitive-and-mnemonic-elements/ ), addresses perceptual, cognitive and mnemonic elements of reading disorders

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Childhood Trauma May Raise Odds of Asthma

Children who experience trauma such as divorce, death of a parent or domestic violence are more likely to develop asthma than other kids, new research suggests. "We know that young children are susceptible to numerous adverse factors that they may be exposed to in the home environment, including cigarette smoking, indoor triggers, and even, as this study shows, dysfunctional families and associated domestic violence," said Dr. James Sublett, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, in a college news release. To read more, click here

Newer Test for Down Syndrome Called 'Major Advance'

A DNA-based blood test appears to be more effective in detecting possible Down syndrome in unborn children than other screening methods for the genetic disorder, researchers say. The test exhibited perfect accuracy in a clinical trial, detecting Down syndrome in all 38 women whose children had inherited the disorder, the researchers report in the April 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. By comparison, standard screening methods only detected Down syndrome in 30 of the 38 expecting mothers, the study authors said. To read more, click here

Exercise Might Boost Mental Function in People With Schizophrenia

Aerobic exercise might boost memory and thinking skills in people with schizophrenia, a small study finds. The research included 33 schizophrenia patients who were randomly assigned to receive one of two treatments. One group was given standard psychiatric treatment (the control group). The other took part in a 12-week aerobic exercise program using active-play video games and standard exercise equipment. The patients in the exercise group also continued to receive standard psychiatric care. To read more, click here

NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

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Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

More Americans Survive Childhood Cancers, But Health Problems Persist

More Americans are surviving childhood cancers than ever before, but many suffer lingering health problems as adults, a new study finds. About 70 percent of adults who survived cancer in childhood have a mild or moderate chronic condition. And nearly one-third have a severe, disabling or life-threatening condition, the researchers found. "The fact that many of the indicators of the chronic conditions we examined increased with age was not altogether surprising. However, when you look at the age of these survivors, the magnitude of these conditions at relatively young ages is quite striking," said lead researcher Siobhan Phillips, an assistant professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. To read more, click here

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TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Guess the answer to this week's trivia question and we'll recognize you in next week's Week in Review.
Congratulations to: Stacey Tapper, Marilyn Haile, Pamela R. Downing-Hosten, Jennifer Klump, Karen Bornholm and Olumide Akerele who all knew the answer to last week's trvia question: According to the latest research, children conceived through assisted reproductive technology, such as in vitro fertilization, are twice as likely to have which one of the special education disabilities as those conceived without assistance?
ANSWER:  AUTISM
THIS WEEK'S TRIVIA QUESTION:
According to the U.S. Department of Education, over the past 5 years, have the annual number of complaints related to disability discrimination in U.S. schools increased, decreased or remained relatively the same?
If you know the answer, send an email to contactus@naset.org
All answers must be submitted no later than Monday, April 13, 2015 at 12:00 p.m.

NASET Members Only

Violent Video Games Don't Influence Kids' Behavior: Study

A small study offers a mixed view on whether video games may make kids more aggressive. Those children who spend more time playing games might be slightly likelier to be hyperactive and to get into fights. But violent video games seem to have no effect on behavior, according to British researchers. The researchers also said they discovered that kids who played video games for less than an hour a day were more likely to be less aggressive and rated as better-behaved by their teachers. To read more, click here

Benefits of Iron Supplements Unclear for Pregnant Women, Young Children

Taking iron supplements during pregnancy doesn't appear to significantly change any health outcomes for mom or baby, a new review shows. A second review -- this one on infants and toddlers -- found no evidence that iron supplements improved growth or development. Both conclusions come from a U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) review of the latest research on iron supplementation and screening for pregnant women, babies and young children. To read more, click here

Digital Compass Attached to Brain Helps Blind Rats 'See'

New research in rats suggests a special compass might one day help blind people navigate their physical environments. Using a head-mounted device, Japanese scientists attached a microstimulator and a digital compass to the brains of blind rats, and those rats were then able to move through mazes nearly as well as rats with normal vision. The compass automatically detected the rat's head direction and generated electrical pulses that indicated which direction -- such as north or south -- the rat was facing. To read more, click here

NASET - Members Only Savings

NASET is pleased to provide our members with exclusive access to discounts on products and services. These savings are available to all current NASET members. To find out more about savings from Life Lock, Avis, Budget, Cruises Only, Orlando Vacations and more - Click here

E-Cigs Tied to Drinking, Other Risky Teen Behaviors

Electronic cigarettes are used by both smoking and nonsmoking teens, and are associated with drinking and other risky behaviors, a new study finds. "We found that e-cigarette access is strongly related to alcohol use in teenagers," said study author Karen Hughes. She is a professor of behavioral epidemiology at Liverpool John Moores University in England. To read more, click here

Kids With Autism See Big Benefits From Massage

A massage treatment developed for children who have autism can lessen its severity by a third in the first five months after diagnosis, making the treatment an effective early intervention, according to a newly published report. The treatment, developed by Louisa Silva, founder of the Oregon-based Qigong Sensory Training Institute and a visiting professor at Western Oregon University, was found to be effective for both high- and low-functioning children with autism. To read more, click here

Head Injuries May Prematurely Age the Brain, Study Suggests

Serious head injuries may lead to premature brain aging, a new British study suggests. "Traumatic brain injury is not a static event. It can set off secondary processes, possibly related to inflammation, that can cause more damage in the brain for years afterwards, and may contribute to the development of Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia," study leader Dr. James Cole, from Imperial College London, said in a college news release. To read more, click here

New Research Tightens Childhood Paralysis-Enterovirus D68 Link

New research strengthens the suspected connection between a virus called enterovirus D68 and the sudden development of paralysis in children in California and Colorado between 2012 and 2014. The researchers found the genetic signature of a specific type of enterovirus D68, called B1, in half of youngsters who developed acute flaccid myelitis. This complication causes sudden muscle weakness and paralysis. The researchers didn't find any other infectious agent that was capable of causing the children's symptoms. To read more, click here

Gestational Diabetes Drug Might Raise Babies' Complication Risk

When used to treat diabetes that develops during pregnancy (gestational diabetes), the drug glyburide has been linked to a number of complications in the baby, according to a new study. In fact, infants born to mothers given glyburide (DiaBeta) during pregnancy had a higher risk of respiratory distress, needing intensive care, having low blood sugar, being too large at birth, and birth injury when compared to babies born to mothers treated with insulin. To read more, click here

U.S. Pediatricians Remain Opposed to Random Drug Tests in Schools

Random drug testing in schools may sound like a good way to keep kids off drugs, but there is little evidence it works, the American Academy of Pediatrics says. In a new report, the nation's leading group of pediatricians reaffirms its stance against random drug testing in schools. The group suggests schools redirect their limited resources toward helping students avoid or overcome drug problems. To read more, click here

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NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

Unemployment Rises Among Those With Disabilities

Even as the overall job situation continues to improve, an increasing number of Americans with disabilities are unemployed, according to data from the U.S. Department of Labor. Figures released Friday show that the jobless rate among individuals with disabilities climbed to 11.7 percent in March. That's an increase over the 11.2 percent rate reported for the previous month. Despite the uptick, however, unemployment for Americans with disabilities is down significantly compared to the same time last year when the jobless rate for this population was pegged at 14.5 percent. To read more, click here

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UN Challenges Businesses To Hire More On The Spectrum

The leader of the United Nations is calling on businesses around the world to step up and do their part in employing people with autism. U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon is launching a "call to action," urging employers to make "concrete commitments" to hire those on the spectrum. "We encourage public offices, corporations and small businesses to have a closer look at the way they perceive people with autism, to take the time to learn about the condition and to create life-changing opportunities," Ban said. To read more, click here

E-Cigarettes May Pose a Risk in Pregnancy and to Children

Nicotine exposure from e-cigarettes may damage the developing brains of infants in the womb, as well as the brains of children and adolescents, suggests a new review of nicotine's effects. Animal experiments have shown that exposure to nicotine can harm developing lungs and brains, according to the review's senior author Dr. Tim McAfee, director of U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Office on Smoking and Health. The harm in the animal brains occurs in areas involved in thinking and language development, and short- and long-term memory, he said. To read more, click here

Special Education Law Symposium

The 40th Anniversary of the IDEA: The Past is Prologue


REGISTER NOW: June 21 - June 26, 2015


Lehigh University's intensive one-week institute provides a practical analysis of legislation, regulations, and case law relating to the education of students with disabilities. The symposium is designed for special education coordinators and teachers, principals, psychologists, parent advocates, attorneys (on both sides), hearing officers, state officials, and other individuals interested in legal literacy concerning the education of students with disabilities.

The workshop is offered for graduate and continuing education credit. Weekly and daily options are available.  Full information is now available on our website:coe.lehigh.edu/law.  For any questions, email or call Shannon Weber or Donna Johnson at specialedlaw@lehigh.edu or (610) 758-5557.

 

Supreme Court Rules Against Disability Providers

Developmental disability service providers cannot sue to force state Medicaid programs to raise their reimbursement rates, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled. In a 5-4 decision, the high court ruled against a group of Idaho agencies serving people with developmental disabilities. The service providers had argued that the state failed to raise Medicaid payments as outlined in a federally-approved formula for years even as such agencies faced rising costs. But, in a blow to the providers, the Supreme Court ruled that private companies currently lack any right to enforce Medicaid requirements. Rather, it is up to the U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services to ensure that states comply with the program's rules, the court said. To read more, click here

jobs

NASET's Latest Job Listings

* Early Child Autism Teacher - Our students need your expertise, passion and leadership. We are looking for highly motivated and skilled talent to join our team at the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS). To learn more - Click here


* Self Contained Classroom Special Education Teacher - $46,000/year with 16 weeks off. Special Education Teachers needed in Arizona (Phoenix and surrounding cities). Needs are in the self-contained setting serving students with emotional disabilities (ED), Autism (A), Severe/Profound (S/P), and Intellectual Disabilities (ID). To learn more - Click here


* Teacher - The Help Group is the largest, most innovative and comprehensive nonprofit organization of its kind in the United States serving children with special needs related to autism, Asperger's disorder, learning disabilities, ADHD, mental retardation, abuse and emotional problems. To learn more - Click here


* Executive Dir of Special Education and Student Srv - Provides vision, leadership, oversight and evaluation for the Department of Special Education, Alternative Education, Health Services, Pupil Personnel, School Counseling and School Psychology. To learn more - Click here


* Special Education Teacher: $125K Salary - Earn a $125,000 salary and join a team of master teachers at The Equity Project (TEP) Charter School, recently featured on the front page of the New York Times. To learn more -Click here


* Director of Student Supports - RePublic is searching for passionate, bold, and gritty Directors of Student Supports (Special Education) ready to lock arms with the teasm at Liberty Collegiate, Nashville Prep and RePublic High for the 2015-16 school year. To learn more - Click here


* Teacher - We are looking for highly motivated and skilled talent to join our team at the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS). We seek individuals who are passionate about transforming and improving educational outcomes for our students. To learn more - Click here


* Learning Specialist - The New School of San Francisco is a K-12 public charter school, demonstrating a "hands-on, minds-on" approach to learning that harnesses each student's curiosity and encourages learners to construct their own meaning and knowledge through hands-on experiences. To learn more - Click here

Food For Thought..........

Never cut a tree down in the wintertime. Never make a negative decision in the low time. Never make your most important decisions when you are in your worst moods. Wait. Be patient. The storm will pass. The spring will come.

Robert H. Schuller

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