Week in Review - May 1, 2020


NASET

WEEK IN REVIEW

National Association of Special Education Teachers

May 1, 2020                    Vol 16 Issue #18


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Dear NASET Members and Guests,


Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW.  Here, we provide you with the latest publications fromNASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW at news@naset.org. Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,


NEW THIS WEEK ON NASET

NASET Special Educator E-Journal May 2020

Table of Contents


To access this months e-journal, Click Here



How COVID-19 is Making Daily Life Challenging for Those with Autism

Like most parents, Megan Hufton has been sheltering-in-place with her two young sons, AJ, 10, and Asher, 8, as the current COVID-19 outbreak sweeps through the nation and world. Both of her sons have autism are non-verbal. During the lockdown, she's been making sure they pivot between Zoom video lessons from their school and 8 to 10 video therapy sessions a week. Of course, it's been hard for their family. For Hufton, a single mom who lives with her sons in a town just outside Madison, Wisconsin, the life changes brought about by COVID-19 were unexpected and immediate. Both boys attend a special education school with Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) therapy, speech therapy, physical therapy, and occupational therapy services. Her sons also visit an outpatient therapy clinic for speech therapy, occupational therapy, and eating therapy. Read More


 


Iowa Parents Seeking Solutions for Special Education Learning at Home

Joy Barlean is frustrated. Her twin boys Luke and Logan have Down syndrome and aren't getting the special education they need because of schools being closed. Barlean understands the COVID-19 situation, but feels like the Des Moines school district isn't doing much to compensate for it. "I've asked about trying things like tele-education, and how can we get some support and adapting and modifying the things they are providing," she said. The issue is one that's affecting students all over Iowa. The Parkin family is seeing it with Nolen. He has a rare syndrome that means he's non-verbal and needs special supports to learn. "He has a one-on-one associate at school and a special needs teacher and now that's all gone," says his dad, Jason. Read More


TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Congratulations to: Durojaiye Titilayom, Rebekah Zuel, Claire Frederick, Terri Richey Menifee, Elizabeth Maloney, Karyn Greco, John Adduru, Latorrya Buie, Karen Frantz-Fry, Alana Tutwiler, Clifford James, Charise King, Mariola Papa, Elizabeth Ciccarelli-Ross, Shelma Brackett, Patsy Ray, Wanda Routier, Olumide Akerele, Tracey Christilles, Cindi Maurice, Daniel Rayder, Leah Vasquez, Arpi Tamzarian, Kirby Morrison, and Charles Pruitt who all knew the answer to last week's trivia question:

Born on August 31, 1870, in the provincial town of Chiaravalle, Italy, this Italian physician, educator, and innovator, was acclaimed for her educational method that builds on the way children learn naturally. She opened her first school-the Casa dei Bambini, or Children's House-in Rome on January 6, 1907. Subsequently, she traveled the world and wrote extensively about her approach to education, attracting many devotees. There are now thousands of these schools named after her in countries worldwide. Who is she? 

Answer: MARIA MONTESSORI 

THE TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK WILL RETURN ON MAY 8, 2020 



Special Education Teachers Concerned About Learning Gaps

Teachers across Minnesota are overcoming obstacles to carry out distance learning during the pandemic, including special education teachers. Education leaders say many teachers are stepping up to meet the needs of students after the crisis threw distance learning in their laps, but special-education teachers face unique circumstances. Special ed teacher Amber Serfling says these services often are individualized, requiring face-to-face work. "I work mainly with students who qualify under the category of emotional-behavior disabilities. Most of those goals are around social interaction, self-management social skills. So navigating a way to meet those goals distantly has been a challenge." Read More


More Screen Time for Babies Tied to Autism-Like Symptoms

Greater screen exposure and less interactive play between caregivers and children early in life is associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD)-like symptoms at age 2 years, according to a study published online April 20 in JAMA Pediatrics. Karen Frankel Heffler, M.D., from the Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia, and colleagues evaluated the association of experiential factors, including social activities and screen viewing in the first 18 months of life, as well as perinatal factors and demographic factors with ASD-like symptoms at 2 years. The analysis included data from 2,152 children participating in the National Children's Study (Oct. 1, 2010, to Oct. 31, 2012). Read More


Distance Learning Presents Challenges for Special Education Students, Teachers

The sudden switch to distance learning during the coronavirus pandemic has been an adjustment for everyone involved. But it has been especially tough for students with special needs, who often have trouble transitioning to new routines. "Some days are harder than others," said Daniel Whitney, whose daughter Alessandra is on the autism spectrum and has generalized anxiety disorder. Alessandra is struggling to embrace distance learning. But her father said she is making progress, in large part due to the support she is getting from her fifth grade teachers at Bennet Academy in Manchester. "I just want to say that they are the best teachers," she said. Stephanie Wanzer, a special education teacher in Trumbull, said the situation has been a learning curve for her as well. Read More


Advocates: Special Education Programs Difficult to Plan, Deliver During Pandemic

Special education is difficult to achieve through online alternative learning, according to the leaders of two groups representing students with disabilities. Some parents are choosing online video conferencing for meetings with Columbia Public Schools specialists to determine their child's special education plan. Others are delaying that planning while schools are closed. The plan meetings can be especially difficult. Before schools were closed, special education parents were lobbying to be allowed to record the meetings because they can be so overwhelming. "Some are doing Zoom meetings and some are postponing," Ribaudo said. She has a Zoom meeting scheduled for Wednesday to discuss the next step in her child's special education plan. It isn't expected to be complicated, she said. Read More


Lehigh University Special Education Law Symposium-Responsive Revisions

Now to be offered in distance learning format (via secure password access) and at reduced rates, the Lehigh University Special Education Law Symposium will be held, as scheduled, from June 21-26, 2020. Weekly or "per day" registration options available. Dr. Perry Zirkel has added a new session to the originally advertised program: COVID-19 Issues under the IDEA and Section 504. Featuring a keynote by OSEP director Laurie VanderPloeg, eight new "hot topic" sessions by paired attorneys for a duel perspective, and a culminating comprehensive update from Professor Zirkel, this year's symposium promises to be the best ever in this nationally prominent program. The week also includes the overlapping, but separable Lehigh Section 504 Institute on June 25-26. In light of the pandemic, consider this uniquely safe opportunity to learn from experienced and prominent attorneys (both sides), which includes password access to their detailed outlines with complete legal citations. For complete information, see the symposium website: go.lehigh.edu/spedlaw.


Special Education During Coronavirus: What Should Parents Tolerate, Demand?

Maegen Wagner wants her daughter to learn in the same classroom as everyone else. It's a simple goal that requires a lot of effort - even when there isn't a global pandemic. Her first-grade daughter, Elizabeth, has Down Syndrome, ADHD, and a condition called Oppositional Defiant Disorder. Her special education plan provides her with a speech therapist, a physical therapist, and a one-to-one aide that follows her throughout the school day. With that coordinated assistance, Elizabeth can function in a general education classroom and do a modified version of the work her classmates do. "The main goal for Elizabeth was full inclusion so she would have that peer interaction," said Wagner, whose children attend the Wilson School District just outside Reading. "[But] nothing is really inclusive anymore." Read More



Special Needs Teachers Have to be 'Patient, Flexible and Creative' with Online Classes

Maegen Wagner wants her daughter to learn in the same classroom as everyone else. It's a simple goal that requires a lot of effort - even when there isn't a global pandemic. Her first-grade daughter, Elizabeth, has Down Syndrome, ADHD, and a condition called Oppositional Defiant Disorder. Her special education plan provides her with a speech therapist, a physical therapist, and a one-to-one aide that follows her throughout the school day. With that coordinated assistance, Elizabeth can function in a general education classroom and do a modified version of the work her classmates do. "The main goal for Elizabeth was full inclusion so she would have that peer interaction," said Wagner, whose children attend the Wilson School District just outside Reading. "[But] nothing is really inclusive anymore." Read More


Special Needs Teachers Have to be 'Patient, Flexible and Creative' with Online Classes

Melissa Barry sits at her computer around 10 hours every day, waiting on calls for help from parents or for a student to pop into her Google Hangout to chat. She's afraid to step away from the computer for more than a minute or two. What if a student joins the hangout and she's not there to help? On a weekday like this, Barry would normally have been in constant interaction with students. She'd walk around 10,000 steps through the halls of Smith Middle School, helping special needs students in general education classes. "None of us selected teaching because we were office people," Barry said. "So this is something we're all really struggling with." Special needs teachers across the Triangle and the state have had to adapt to the pandemic keeping all of their students at home. But with EC classes, there are unique challenges to teaching online courses. Read More


'It's a Civil Rights Issue.' Special Education in the Midst of a Pandemic

As a Mercer Island High School senior, I worried that school closures would make it difficult for me to graduate on time. I wasn't worried about finishing my course work, though, because I knew it would continue online. Unfortunately, many students with disabilities won't be able to transition to online courses so easily. Christine Kenyon, a special education teacher at my school, worries that her students' education will be completely disrupted by the closure. Students placed in Ms. Kenyon's classroom may have multiple disabilities. "Some might have Down Syndrome or autism," she said. "Some might be nonverbal learners. Fine motor and gross motor skills might be different than their peers." Online education may not be accessible for many students with disabilities. Read More


Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

AASEP Logo

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee. AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children. Read More 


It's Official: Massachusetts Schools are Closed for the Year

The past month has been a major adjustment, to say the least, for parents, teachers, and kids, all of whom have had to adapt to the closures of Massachusetts schools while we ride out the pandemic. Unfortunately for all of them, we aren't through with this just yet, and so as many likely anticipated, schools will not be reopening this school year, Gov. Charlie Baker has just announced. Baker initially ordered schools closed March 15 through April 27, then extended that order through May 4. The announcement comes a day after Boston Mayor Marty Walsh said during a new briefing that schools would certainly not be reopening in early May, and cast doubt on whether students would be able to return to classrooms before the fall. The order does not apply to residential special education facilities. Read More


Summer Games Canceled, But not Spirit

Athlete Laura Scott, 36, can't compete with her peers in the Special Olympics Delaware Summer Games in June, since it won't be held. But her mom said that hasn't stopped the bocce player and cyclist from staying physically fit during this stay-at-home lockdown. "She does have a tricycle and she's been riding it around the neighborhood," said Laura's mom, Susan Scott, of Middletown. "She also plays golf and wants to start practicing hitting golf balls in the backyard." Laura is one of 4,000-plus athletes in Special Olympics Delaware, who's trying to get through the coronavirus quarantine like everyone else. "I think the big part of Special Olympics for her is the social connection, in addition to the sports," her mom said. Her daughter plays for the MOT Tigers and has been involved in Special Olympics for about 20 years, including stints in neighboring states in Maryland and Virginia. Read More


NASET BOARD CERTIFICATION PROGRAM IN SPECIAL EDUCATION ADVOCACY

The National Association of Special Education Teachers (NASET) and the American Academy of Special Education Professionals (AASEP) recognize the increasing need for qualified special education advocates. In order to enhance this area of concern, they have created a comprehensive special education advocacy program whereby upon completion, you become a Board Certified Advocate in Special Education (BCASE). The BCASE program offers you all the materials to be an effective, articulate, and qualified special education advocate. completion of the BCASE program will provide you with the knowledge, skills and abilities to be confident as an advocate for children with special needs and their parents.­ To learn more about becoming a Board Certified Advocate in Special Education (BCASE), click here



Antibodies Could Provide New Treatment for OCD

Scientists at Queen Mary University of London and the University of Roehampton, London, have discovered that patients suffering from obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) have increased levels of a protein called Immuno-moodulin (Imood) in their lymphocytes, a type of immune cell. Mice with high levels of this protein were also found to exhibit behaviours that are characteristic of anxiety and stress, such as digging and excessive grooming. When the researchers treated the mice with an antibody that neutralised Imood, the animals' anxiety levels reduced. The findings have led the researchers to file a patent application for the antibody and they are now working with a drug company to develop a potential treatment for human patients. Read More


Honor Society for Special Education Teachers

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Age Matters: Paternal Age and the Risk of Neurodevelopmental Disorders in Children

It is no secret that genetic factors play a role in determining whether children have neurodevelopmental disorders. Maternal exposure to drugs and viral or bacterial illnesses can be detrimental too. However, a recent epidemiological survey of approximately 6 million people worldwide has revealed that advanced paternal age is associated with the development of neurodevelopmental disorders. In other words, the older the parent, the increased risk a child has of developing disorders such as autism, ADHD and other learning disabilities. A research team from the Department of Developmental Neuroscience at the Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine has revealed further details about this phenomenon with their recent publication in PLOS ONE. Read More


Iowa Parents Seeking Solutions for Special Education Learning at Home

Joy Barlean is frustrated. Her twin boys Luke and Logan have Down syndrome and aren't getting the special education they need because of schools being closed. Barlean understands the COVID-19 situation, but feels like the Des Moines school district isn't doing much to compensate for it. "I've asked about trying things like tele-education, and how can we get some support and adapting and modifying the things they are providing," she said. The issue is one that's affecting students all over Iowa. The Parkin family is seeing it with Nolen. He has a rare syndrome that means he's non-verbal and needs special supports to learn. "He has a one-on-one associate at school and a special needs teacher and now that's all gone," says his dad, Jason. Read More


Special Education Teachers Concerned About Learning Gaps

Teachers across Minnesota are overcoming obstacles to carry out distance learning during the pandemic, including special education teachers. Education leaders say many teachers are stepping up to meet the needs of students after the crisis threw distance learning in their laps, but special-education teachers face unique circumstances. Special ed teacher Amber Serfling says these services often are individualized, requiring face-to-face work. "I work mainly with students who qualify under the category of emotional-behavior disabilities. Most of those goals are around social interaction, self-management social skills. So navigating a way to meet those goals distantly has been a challenge." Read More


As Colorado Kids with Disabilities Study Remotely, Some are Lacking Critical Support Services

With all four of her children home, Deronn Turner's house is filled with writing assignments, art projects, books, flashcards and learning devices. Her children are what she calls "creative crazies." Two are enrolled at Denver School of the Arts and the oldest is a student at the Maryland Institute College of Art. "My work is to keep people's feet on the ground," Turner said. Another one of her leading jobs: teacher, especially for her youngest child, Shepsira, who has Down syndrome. Now that they're all studying at home, Turner is by her 10-year-old daughter's side most of each day. Turner tries to reinforce the skills she'd learned in her fourth-grade class at Cole Arts and Science Academy, like writing her name and reading books. But she says she's worried. When children with neurological or intellectual delays lose skills, they have to work really hard to relearn them, said Turner, who before she had kids worked for at least a decade with adults and children with developmental, intellectual and physical disabilities. Read More



* Teacher-Special Education - Tacoma Public Schools is looking for exceptional special education professionals ready to inspire and make a positive impact on students. Our special education program serves approximately 4,000 students from preschool through high school; serving ages three to twenty-one. Specially designed instruction and related services are based upon the need of each student. To learn more - Click here

* Principal New York Institute for Special Education - The ideal candidate will be a well-respected special educator with experience teaching the blind and visually impaired who possesses knowledge of students with emotional disabilities and who, preferably, has administrative experience at the departmental or building level. A proven instructional leader who will maintain a safe and healthy school environment that is conducive to learning. To learn more - Click here

* Upper Division Learning Specialist - Casady School, will be expected to collaborate with the Student Support Services Team to provide assistance and resources for students with learning and behavioral differences, & Consult with the Upper Division problem solving team to review supports and monitor the progress of students with learning and behavioral differences. To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Under the direction of the building principal and special education director, the special education teacher will develop and provide specialized instruction to meet the individual and unique needs of students with disabilities, evaluate and assess student progress based on instructional goals and objectives, and adhere to federal and state statutes and regulations governing special education services. To learn more - Click here 

* Executive Director - The Timothy School is the oldest Approved Private School in Pennsylvania devoted exclusively to teaching students with autism. Its instructional program, widely considered one of the best in the region, provides students with the communication, social, cognitive, and life skills necessary to enable them to function effectively and as independently as possible in the least restrictive environment. To learn more - Click here

* Director of Academic Support - As program director, assist with school admissions and develop plans based on IEP/Psychological evaluation for students with mild learning disabilities, and or students with ADD/ADHD. Limited academic evaluations. Must consult regularly with teachers, students, parents, and administrators regarding the development of interventions for students demonstrating learning and/or behavioral challenges. To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Teacher - The Moffat County School District is looking for a motivated, caring, and enthusiastic persons to fill Special Education Teacher positions on the Elementary and Secondary level for the 2020-2021 School Year. Along with parents and classroom teachers the Special Education teacher will assess students’ skills to determine their needs to develop and implement Individualized Education Programs for each student based on their specific needs and abilities.To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Stars is seeking Special Education Teachers in Arizona (Phoenix and surrounding cities).  With a proven track record, STARS is able to offer you an unbeatable support system and resources. We are hiring for the 2020-2021 school year. STARS places Special Education Teachers throughout the Phoenix, Tucson and the surrounding area public schools. to learn more - Click here


Food For Thought..........

Don't be pushed around by the fears in your mind. Be led by the dreams in your heart.
                                   Roy T. Bennet

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