Video Lecture Topics

The following list of video lecture descriptions provides a link to the specific video lecture page. In addition to the video lecture there is a link to view or download the accompanying Power Point presentation.


Characteristics of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

This lecture focuses on an overview of terms and concepts of importance in special education.  Areas covered include: definition of special education, exceptionality, disability classifications, gender issues in special education, internalizing and externalizing behaviors, using correct language, accommodations and modifications, expectations for special educators, universal design for learning, inclusion and the difference between a disability and a handicap. Go to this Video Lecture - Click here


Evaluation and Eligibility of Children with Suspected Disabilities

The process of a child moving from general education to special education has many steps. The federal law, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), sets forth very specific steps and procedures to ensure that children with suspected disabilities are evaluated for special education and determined eligible for services in a step-by-step manner. Each step along the way often has many parts, and it is imperative as a teacher that you understand the nature of the special education process involving evaluation and eligibility. This NASET professional development course will focus on the identification, evaluation and eligibility of children with suspected disabilities. After watching this video lecture, you should understand the following:

  • Child Find
  • Indicators of Children Who May Have a Suspected Disability and Need an Evaluation
  • How Students Are Identified For An Evaluation For A Suspected Disability
  • Child Study Teams (CST)
  • Parental Consent
  • Consent v. Agreement
  • Evaluation Standard
  • Multidisciplinary Teams
  • Discriminatory Evaluations
  • Validity and Reliability
  • Standardization
  • Comprehensive Evaluations
  • Testing and Report Writing in Native Language
  • Eligibility
  • Eligibility Committees
  • Annual and Triennial Reviews

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Exceptionality and Special Education

This lecture focuses on an overview of terms and concepts of importance in special education.  Areas covered include: definition of special education, exceptionality, disability classifications, gender issues in special education, internalizing and externalizing behaviors, using correct language, accommodations and modifications, expectations for special educators, universal design for learning, inclusion and the difference between a disability and a handicap. Go to this Video Lecture - Click here


Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE)

Prior to the passage of P.L. 94-142, many students with disabilities were excluded from school entirely, and many others were offered an education that was not appropriate to their needs. ? When P.L. 94-142 was enacted in 1975, it required that States submit plans that assured all students with disabilities the right to a free appropriate public education (FAPE). Today, IDEIA requires that all States demonstrate that they have in effect “a policy that assures all children with disabilities the right to a free appropriate public education.” But what really is a FAPE? What’s mandated in order to provide FAPE to all children receiving special education? The focus of this NASET video lecture will be to discuss in detail a free appropriate public education.

Topics covered include:

  • Introduction to FAPE
  • Definition of FAPE
  • “Free”--Education Be At No Cost To The Parent
  • Hendrick Hudson District Board of Education v. Rowley
  • Educational Benefit
  • Cadillac v. Chevrolet argument
  • Best v. Appropriate
  • Defining An “Appropriate” Education
  • Graduation and FAPE

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Gifted and Talented Students: An Overview for Teachers

According to the National Association for Gifted Children, “children are gifted when their ability is significantly above the norm for their age. Giftedness may manifest in one or more domains such as; intellectual, creative, artistic, leadership, or in a specific academic field such as language arts, mathematics or science…It is important to note that not all gifted children look or act alike. Giftedness exists in every demographic group and personality type. It is important that adults look hard to discover potential and support gifted children as they reach for their personal best.” There is no standard global definition of what constitutes a gifted student. Multiple definitions of giftedness are used by different groups. Most of these definitions select the students who are the most skilled or talented in a given area, e.g., the students with the most skill or talent in music, language, logical reasoning, or mathematics. Being gifted and talented does not fall into one of the 13 classifications of special education, however, these children are still considered “exceptional children”. The focus of this NASET video lecture will be on learners with special gifts and talents.

Topics covered include:

  • Definition of gifted and talented
  • Insight
  • Creativity
  • Genius
  • Prevalence
  • Bright versus gifted students
  • Key points on giftedness
  • Teaching strategies for gifted students

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Historical Overview of the Legal Issues in Special Education

Generally, over the years, special education has been restructured and transformed by legislation. Today, we have a federal special education law, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). IDEA was originally enacted by Congress in 1975 to ensure that children with disabilities have the opportunity to receive a free appropriate public education, just like other children.  An “appropriate” education differs for each child with a disability because it is based on his or her individual needs. IDEA specifies in some detail how school systems and parents are to plan the education that each child receives so that it is appropriate—meaning, responsive to the child’s needs. The plan that parents and school staff develop is documented in writing through the individualized education program (IEP), which the school is then responsible for carrying out.  IDEA has been revised many times since 1975 and it remains the cornerstone of special education. But how did we get to this law? The path was not an easy one. This lecture takes teachers through the history of special education and how state and federal laws were enacted.

Topics covered include:

  • Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas
  • 14th Amendment of the US Constitution
  • 1960s—What happened during that time regarding special education?
  • Parc v. Commonwealth of PA
  • Mills vs. Board of Education of D.C.
  • Section 504 of the Vocational Rehabilitation Act
  • P.L. 94-142
  • Six key provisions of P.L. 94-142
  • Key points about P.L. 99-457
  • IDEA
  • Definition of Reauthorization
  • Today under IDEIA—What do we know?

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Related Services

Related services help children with disabilities benefit from their special education by providing extra help and support in needed areas, such as speaking or moving. Related services are defined in IDEIA as: “transportation, and such developmental, corrective and other supportive services….as may be required to assist a child with a disability to benefit from special education.” Related services must be provided to all eligible children in special education. But, just because a child is in special education doesn’t mean he/she will be eligible for related services. IDEIA includes a long list of related services that schools must provide to students who need them to receive a meaningful education. It is important to note, however, that this list does not include all of the services which a school district may be required to provide. The focus of this NASET professional development course will be to address some of the most common related services offered to children with disabilities. After viewing these videos you should understand the following:

  • Overview of related services
  • Transportation
  • Speech and language therapy
  • Psychological and Counseling Service
  • Occupational and Physical Therapy (OT/PT)
  • Orientation and Mobility Services
  • Medical Services
  • School health service
  • Parent counseling
  • Travel training

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Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

This lecture focuses on students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Topics covered include: definition of ASD, prevalence of ASD, possible causes of ASD, educational programming for students with ASD, characteristics of students with ASD, Asperger Syndrome and teaching students with ASD. Go to this Video Lecture - Click here


Students with Communication Disorders (Speech and Language Impairments)

This lecture focuses on students with communication disorders (speech and language impairments). Topics covered include: definition of a speech and language impairment, differences between speech versus language, types of speech disorders, characteristics of speech disorders, language disorders, characteristics of language disorders, causes of communication disorders and teaching strategies for students with communication disorders. - Click here


Teaching Students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

This lecture focuses on teaching students with ADHD.  Topics covered include: definition of ADHD, types of ADHD, inattention, hyperactivity, impulsivity, diagnosis of ADHD, problems associated with ADHD, prevalence, treatment recommendations, medications, behavioral therapy, and educational interventions. Go to this Video Lecture - Click here


Teaching Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

This lecture focuses on teaching students with emotional and behavioral disorders.  Topics covered include: overview of emotional disturbance (ED), definition of ED, social maladjustment, prevalence controversy, gender features of students with ED, age of identification of students with ED and education of students with ED. - Click here


Teaching Students with Intellectual Disabilities

This lecture focuses on teaching students with intellectual disabilities.  Topics covered include: definition of intellectual disabilities, adaptive behavior, IQ, prevalence, levels of intensities and support, degrees of intellectual disabilities, causes of intellectual disabilities, Down Syndrome, phenylketonuria (PKU), drugs and fetal alcohol syndrome, perinatal and postnatal causes of intellectual disabilities, characteristics of children with intellectual disabilities and classroom management strategies. Go to this Video Lecture - Click here


Teaching Students with Learning Disabilities

This lecture focuses on teaching students with learning disabilities.  Topics covered include: definition of learning disabilities, processing disorders, visual processing, auditory processing, processing speed, types of learning disabilities, discrepancy formulas, causes of learning disabilities, characteristics of children with learning disabilities and teaching strategies. Go to this Video Lecture - Click here


Traumatic Brain Injury: An Overview for Teachers

This video lecture will provide teachers with an overview of TBI. A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an injury to the brain caused by the head being hit by something or shaken violently. This injury can change how the person acts, moves, and thinks. A traumatic brain injury can also change how a student learns and acts in school. The signs of brain injury can be very different depending on where the brain is injured and how severely. Although TBI is very common, many medical and education professionals may not realize that some difficulties can be caused by a childhood brain injury. Often, students with TBI are thought to have a learning disability, emotional disturbance, or an intellectual disability. As a result, they don’t receive the type of educational help and support they really need. Topics covered in this lecture include: educational Definition of Traumatic Brain Injury; Types of TBI—Open Head Injury; Types of TBI—Closed Head Injuries; Causes of TBI; Deficits Resulting from TBI; Educational Concerns for Students with TBI; and Classroom Management Strategies. - Click here


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