Week in Review - December 7, 2012

WEEK IN REVIEW

New NASET Publications and Articles of Interest in Special Education and Disabilities That Were Reported This Week

December 7, 2012 - Vol 8, Issue 47


 

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TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

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Dear NASET News,

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW Here, we provide you with the latest publications from NASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW at news@naset.org.Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,


NASET News Team

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New This Week on NASET

The Practical Teacher
December 2012

Teaching Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities (EBD)

There are numerous resources that are available to facilitate and make teaching students with emotional and behavioral disabilities (EBD) easier. Unfortunately, there is no magic pill or one program that can be called fool proof for this.  Also, any program is only as good as the teacher teaching it. Today's classrooms witness high burn-out rate among existing teachers since the challenges that students with EBD pose are difficult to handle while continuing to teach for extended periods of time. The program that proves effective in such scenarios will be the one that is written by teachers, who are in the midst of it all. Any researcher who writes such a program should have experienced these situations oneself to realize the actual stumbling blocks. This issue of NASET's Practical Teacher, written by Soumya Vaidya, MA, Bed, will focus on teaching students with EBD.

To read or download this issue - Click here (login required)
______________________________________________________

NASET's ADHD Series Part #12

From Tourette's to ADHD and Everything In-Between: Just the Motivation I Needed to Teach Special Education  

By Danielle Hird

 

Written by Danielle Hird, this issue of NASET's ADHD series tells the story of a young woman who is living her life with Tourette's Syndrome, ADHD, and some possible learning disabilities who was unable to receive special education services due to the negative social stigmas of special education. She tells how she graduated from high school with a perfect GPA but with poor learning, reading, and comprehension skills and went on to college wondering why she performed poorly. After officially being diagnosed with ADHD and telling herself she could not get through graduate school, she changed her outlook. She is now more motivated than ever to pursue a degree in special education, to rid the negative stereotypes of being a student with special needs, and encourage students to follow their dreams.



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Could Baby's Crying Give Clues to Autism?

The sounds infants make when they cry could offer insight into the likelihood that they'll later be diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders, a tiny and preliminary study suggests. However, it's too early to know if there actually is a connection between cries and autism or why one would exist in the first place. Even if there is a link, the difference between the crying of babies who are developing normally and those with autism may be too subtle for people to notice without audio analysis by a computer. There's also the question of what could be done, if anything, to help babies at high risk of autism. Now, physicians are unable to diagnose autism disorders until about the age of 18 months. To read more, click here

Did You Know That....

Not all visual impairments are the same, although the umbrella term "visual impairment" may be used to describe generally the consequence of an eye condition or disorder.

Children and Teens with Cystic Fibrosis Struggle to Exercise

Children and teens with cystic fibrosis have impaired blood vessel function, which may affect their ability to exercise, a new study suggests. Exercise is recommended to combat lung complications associated with cystic fibrosis. Researchers had 15 cystic fibrosis patients, aged 8 to 18, pedal a stationary bike as long and hard as they could. It was leg fatigue, rather than lung problems, that forced them to stop pedaling. Further investigation revealed that the cystic fibrosis patients could take in oxygen as well as a control group of 15 children and teens without cystic fibrosis, but their muscles were not as efficient at using oxygen. The researchers also found that the cystic fibrosis patients' blood vessels didn't dilate as well as those of the healthy children and teens. To read more, click here

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NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

Teen Behavior Problems, Not Depression, Tied to Lower Grades

Lower school grades among depressed adolescents are linked to behavior problems, not their depression, a new study finds. Researchers examined data from thousands of U.S. teens who were tracked through their middle and high school years and as they moved into early adulthood. Unlike students with depression, those with behavior problems such as attention issues, delinquency or substance use had lower GPAs than others. The study also found that delinquency and substance use were associated with receiving lesser educational degrees, while depression was not. To read more, click here

Brain Scans Show Differences in Adults With Autism

Brain scans done on groups of men with autism show distinct differences in both the volume of specific regions and the activity of cells that signal a possible immune response, two new studies suggest. Scientists in England and Japan used MRI and PET (positron emission tomography) scans to examine brain-based anatomical and cellular variations in those with autism. But the disparities -- while offering a deeper glimpse into the little-understood developmental disorder -- raised more questions about its cause and treatment that only further research can answer. To read more, click here

Did You Know That....

Hands are a primary information-gathering tool for children with visual impairments. So are the senses of smell, touch, taste, and hearing. Until the child holds the "thing" to be learned and explores its dimensions-let us say, a stuffed animal, a dog, a salt shaker, or a CD player -he or she cannot grasp its details. That is why sensory learning is so powerful for children with visual impairment and why they need to have as many opportunities as possible to experience objects directly and sensorially.

Smoking in Pregnancy Tied to Poor Reading Skills in Kids

Children whose mothers smoked one or more packs of cigarettes a day during pregnancy have poorer reading skills than other children, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed data from more than 5,000 children in the United Kingdom, and compared their scores on a series of tests assessing how accurately a child reads aloud and comprehends what he or she reads. The children were tested at ages 7 and 9. On average, children whose mothers smoked at least one pack of cigarettes a day during pregnancy scored 21 percent lower on the tests than children born to nonsmoking mothers, according to the study published this month in the Journal of Pediatrics. To read more, click here

NASET Sponsor - Arkansas State University

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TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Guess the answer to this week's trivia question and we'll recognize you in next week's Week in Review.
Congratulations to: Prahbhjot Malhi, Ope-Oluwa Olubela, Karen Bornholm, Stacey Slintak, Pamela R. Downing-Hosten, Olumide Akerele and Elena Ghionis who all knew the answer to last week's trvia question:

The resolution process is now a part of IDEIA before due process hearings are held. IDEIA now requires that school systems convene a resolution meeting within 15 days of receiving notice that a parent has filed a due process complaint and before the school system initiates the due process hearing hearing.


THIS WEEK'S TRIVIA QUESTION:
What is the name of the eye condition
where the eyes look in different directions and do not focus simultaneously on a single point?


If you know the answer, send an email to contactus@naset.org
All answers must be submitted no later than Monday, December 10, 2012 at 12:00 p.m.

Study Sees Possible Link Between Air Pollution and Autism Risk

Children exposed to air pollution from traffic and other sources while in the womb and during their first year may be at an increased risk for autism, a new study suggests. Infants exposed to the highest levels of air pollution were three times more likely to develop autism than those exposed to the lowest levels, researchers found. "There is evidence that the immune system might be associated with autism, and pollution affects these same pathways," said lead researcher Heather Volk, assistant professor of preventive medicine at the University of Southern California, in Los Angeles. To read more, click here

AASEP Logo

NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

Fate Of Disability Treaty Unclear In Senate

As the U.S. Senate begins consideration of an international disability rights treaty, it remains uncertain whether or not the United States will join. Earlier this week, senators voted to debate the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The treaty calls for greater community access and a better standard of living for people with disabilities worldwide. However, after hours of speeches on the Senate floor Tuesday, public talk of the treaty grew quiet and lawmakers have yet to hold a vote on ratification. To read more, click here

Athlete With Down Syndrome Wins Sports Illustrated Award

A teen with Down syndrome whose quest to compete on his high school football team made national news will be honored by Sports Illustrated after securing support from fans across the country. Under Michigan rules, Eric Dompierre was ineligible to play high school sports during his senior year because at age 19 he had aged out. But instead of giving up, Dompierre convinced the Michigan High School Athletic Association to change its rules and grant him a waiver so that he could play with his teammates for one more year. Dompierre's team went on to capture the state title and now they will have at least one more journey together. To read more, click here

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As a member of NASET you qualify for a special group discount* on your auto, home, and renter's insurance through Group Savings Plus® from Liberty Mutual. This unique program allows you to purchase high-quality auto, home and renters insurance at low group rates.

 

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Court: Districts Must Repay Parents for Special Ed. Evals

A federal appeals court has upheld a longtime U.S. Department of Education regulation requiring school districts, under certain circumstances, to reimburse parents for independent educational evaluations of their children with disabilities. A three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit, in Atlanta, ruled unanimously to uphold the regulation promulgated under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, the main federal special education law. The rule requires districts or other public agencies to pay for independent evaluations when parents disagree with the public agency's initial assessment of their child. The regulation has been in place in various forms since 1977, two years after the passage of the precursor to the IDEA. To read more, click here

Cyber Charter Threatened Over Treatment of Students With Disabilities

The Georgia education department is threatening to shut down an online school unless it addresses a host of issues related to the education of students with disabilities. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported recently that the state's largest public school-with 12,000 students-could be closed by the end of the school year if it fails to create or obtain individual education plans for students with disabilities, offer those students individualized instruction, and address parent complaints. Those and other issues were spelled out in a report delivered toGeorgia Cyber Academy this month. The newspaper said the report notes that the cyber school's issues with educating students with disabilities dates back to 2009, when those students' test scores ranked among the lowest in the state. To read more, click here

Special Education: What Do Parents Need to Know?

"Special Education: What Do Parents Need to Know?" A 37 minute audio/video overview of special education created to help parents of children with disabilities understand what special education is, how a child might get into special education, how to resolve disagreements, and what role parents play. This video is also available in Spanish, Hmong, and Somali. To watch the video, click here

California School for the Deaf Football Team Wins League Title, Draws National Attention

During his first year coaching the Eagles, Warren Keller led the 19 high school football players straight to a league title. It would be an impressive feat for any team, but it becomes even more remarkable when you consider this: All of them are deaf. According to the Fremont Argus, 26-year-old Warren Keller, who is also deaf, earned the California School for the Deaf a 10-2 record this season -- the school's best in history. Along the way, the Eagles also won the North Central II/Bay League title, nearly drawing them a spot in the sectional title game, the Mercury News reported. The winning streak came despite the fact that the team had so few players that some regularly played both offense and defense. Furthermore, not one of them weighed 200 pounds, which put them at a size disadvantage. To read more, click here

Did You Know That....

Because there are many different causes of visual impairment, the degree of impairment a child experiences can range from mild to severe (up to, and including, blindness).

Effective Teams: The Key to Transforming Schools?

This fall I've been thinking a lot about what makes a good team in a school context. I'll share some of these thoughts, but I really want to hear your ideas on this subject. I'm going to admit that it's taken me a while to feel convinced by the power of teams. Until recently, I didn't have great experiences in teams. I felt that alone I could produce whatever needed to be created better, and quicker, than working with others. I often felt frustrated working in teams -- the process felt so slow and cumbersome. I felt like I was usually given (or took) the bulk of the work. I didn't really know what an effective team looked like, how one worked together, or what the benefits could be. In the last few years, however, my experience in a couple different teams shifted these beliefs. Now, I'm compelled to figure out how to create and develop good teams -- and to identify the specific moves that a coach or facilitator makes in this process. I want to figure out how to grow powerful teams that can transform schools. To read more, click here

Food For Thought..........

Treat everyone with politeness, even those who are rude to you - not because they are nice, but because you are.

Author Unknown

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