Week in Review - September 14, 2012

WEEK IN REVIEW

New NASET Publications and Articles of Interest in Special Education and Disabilities That Were Reported This Week

September 14, 2012 - Vol 8, Issue 34

 

Find us on Facebook

 

Forward this issue to a Friend

 

Join Our Mailing List!

In This Issue

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Quick Links
Read Week in Review on NASET -Click Here

Renew Your Membership on NASET- Click Here (login required)

NASET Resources - Click Here

NASET e-Publications - Click Here

Forgot your User Name or Password? - Click Here

Update/Manage Your Member Profile - Click Here (login required)


Dear NASET News,

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW Here, we provide you with the latest publications from NASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW at news@naset.org.Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,


NASET News Team

NASET Sponsor - Cal Poly Pomona

Cal_Poly_Pomona-8-12

To learn more - Click here

NASET Sponsor - Liberty Mutual

Liberty_Mutual_Bear

To learn more - Click here


New This Week on NASET

Parent Teacher Conference Handout

Perceptual Disabilities

There are many symptoms that may indicate problems in a certain perceptual or learning areas. Some of these are observable, while others are discovered through intakes and testing. What follows is a list of symptoms that may reflect perceptual disabilities in a variety of visual areas. These will provide parents with the language necessary to communicate concerns or labels to identify the conditions already indicated by the behavior of their children.


To read or download this issue - Click here (login required)
______________________________________________________

Lesser Known Disorders in Special Education

September 2012

Disorders covered in this issue:

LD 9.01-Catastrophic Response Organizational Disorder

HI 7.00- Vestibular Schwannoma (Acoustic Neuroma)

LD 9.02-Cognitive Disorganization Disorder (Internal Disorder)

To read or download this issue - Click here (login required)

Listening Aids May Help Boost Reading Skills of Children with Dyslexia

Devices that amplify the sound of a teacher's voice may help children with dyslexia improve their reading skills, new research suggests. After a year of wearing the devices in the classroom, children with dyslexia had improved scores on tests of phonological awareness and reading. "We saw improvements in reading, and when we measured the brain's response to speech sounds, not only did the kids who wore the device become more consistent to the very soft and rapidly changing elements of sound that help distinguish one consonant from another, but their brains responded more consistently to sounds," said study senior author Nina Kraus, a neuroscientist at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill. "That improved stability was linked with reading improvement." To read more, click here

Did You Know That....

According to The National Secondary Transition and Technical Assistance Center (NSTTAC), independent living or life skills are defined as "those skills or tasks that contribute to the successful independent functioning of an individual in adulthood" in the following domains: leisure/recreation, home maintenance and personal care, and community participation.

Parental Problems Prevent Children Taking Much-Needed Asthma Medication, Study Finds

Parental problems and a chaotic home environment could be preventing children from taking their prescribed asthma medication. Non-adherence to asthma medication is a common problem, although it is not yet understood what the major barriers are for patients. In this new study, researchers have, for the first time, recorded and analysed a large range of commonly suspected reasons for children taking their asthma medication ineffectively. As part of an on-going project aiming to assess determinants of adherence to asthma, researchers in the Netherlands electronically measured how well children took their maintenance medication to control their asthma. The project has already produced results showing that children with high adherence rates have well-controlled asthma with fewer symptoms, such as breathlessness and wheeze. To read more, click here

Liberty Mutual Savings

NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Group Savings Plus from Liberty Mutual

As a member of NASET you qualify for a special group discount* on your auto, home, and renter's insurance through Group Savings Plus® from Liberty Mutual. This unique program allows you to purchase high-quality auto, home and renters insurance at low group rates.

 

See for yourself how much money you could save with Liberty Mutual compared to your current insurance provider. For a free, no-obligation quote, call 800-524-9400 or visit

www.libertymutual.com/naset, or visit your local sales office.

*Group discounts, other discounts, and credits are available where state laws and regulations allow, and may vary by state.  Certain discounts apply to specific coverage only.  To the extent permitted by law, applicants are individually underwritten; not all applicants may qualify.  Coverage provided and underwritten by Liberty Mutual Insurance Company and its affiliates, 175 Berkeley Street, Boston, MA.

Super-Shy Preschoolers Might Struggle Academically

A little shyness in young children can be endearing. But new research suggests that preschoolers who are extremely socially reserved and withdrawn may be at risk for falling behind in math and reading when they start kindergarten. The study, published online recently in the Journal of School Psychology, suggests that super-shy kids may be at more risk than their active, overactive and outgoing peers. Children showing shy and withdrawn behavior early in the school year began with lower academic skills than other students and showed the slowest gains in learning skills over time.  Shy kids may fall into the background of the average preschool classroom, making it more likely teachers will fail to identify their unique learning needs, said study author Rebecca Bulotsky-Shearer, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Miami. "Engagement is important in learning, especially in early childhood education. If there is a child who needs that extra support and is being missed, it's easier to fall behind the others," she explained. To read more, click here

Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome Associated With Impaired Brain Function in Adolescents

A new study by researchers at NYU School of Medicine reveals for the first time that metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with cognitive and brain impairments in adolescents and calls for pediatricians to take this into account when considering the early treatment of childhood obesity. The study, funded by the National Institutes of Health under award number DK083537, and in part by award number 1ULIRR029892, from the National Center for Research Resources, appears online September 3 in Pediatrics. As childhood obesity has increased in the U.S., so has the prevalence of metabolic syndrome -- a constellation of three or more of five defined health problems, including abdominal obesity, low HDL (good cholesterol), high triglycerides, high blood pressure and pre-diabetic insulin resistance. Lead investigator Antonio Convit, MD, professor of psychiatry and medicine at NYU School of Medicine and a member of the Nathan Kline Research Institute, and colleagues have shown previously that metabolic syndrome has been linked to neurocognitive impairments in adults, but this association was generally thought to be a long-term effect of poor metabolism. Now, the research team has revealed even worse brain impairments in adolescents with metabolic syndrome, a group absent of clinically-manifest vascular disease and likely shorter duration of poor metabolism. To read more, click here

Did You Know That....

The only area in which postsecondary goals are not required in the IEP is in the area of independent living skills. Goals in the area of independent living are required only if appropriate. It is up to the child's IEP Team to determine whether IEP goals related to the development of independent living skills are appropriate and necessary for the child to receive FAPE.

Intervention Helps Children With Sickle Cell Disease Complete MRI Tests Without Sedation

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital reports success using a targeted educational approach to teach young patients to remain motionless during MRI scans, making the process safer. Sitting still is tough for children, which makes MRI scans a challenge. The scans require that patients remain motionless for extended periods. Findings from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital showed that a brief, targeted intervention dramatically increases the likelihood that children as young as 5 years old will be able to undergo testing without sedation. That is good news for children with sickle cell disease, who were the focus of this study. Patients with sickle cell disease often undergo brain and liver MRIs to check for complications related to their disease or treatment. But the blood disorder puts patients at increased risk for serious anesthesia-related complications, so sedation is avoided when possible. To read more, click here

NASET Sponsor - Cal Poly Pomona

To learn more - Click here

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Guess the answer to this week's trivia question and we'll recognize you in next week's Week in Review.
Congratulations to: Olumide Akerele, Jessica L. Ulmer,

Meredith Powell, Kathleen George,

Marlene Barnett, 

Rebecca S. Birrenkott,

Melissa Denton, Hermie Speckels, and Jesse Snyder

who all knew the answer to last week's trivia question: 78 families were used in the study examining fathers and autism


THIS WEEK'S TRIVIA QUESTION:
In what year and in what city were the first Paralympic Games held?

If you know the answer, send an email to contactus@naset.org
All answers must be submitted no later than Monday, September 17, 2012 at 12:00 p.m.

Why Children With Asthma Are More Likely to Be Bullied

New research has uncovered several factors which could explain why children with asthma are at an increased risk of being bullied. Bullying or teasing of children with any chronic medical condition is common, yet it is not always clear what factors contribute to this. Researchers from the Derbyshire Children's Hospital, in the UK, used data from the large six-country "Room to Breathe" survey of childhood asthma, to look at the factors associated with an increased risk of bullying. Parents and children aged 7 years and above were interviewed as part of the study. Data was collected from 943 questionnaires which asked questions about conditions at home, lifestyle of parents and children and their overall experience of their condition. To read more,click here

AASEP Logo

NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

Childhood Vaccination Rates Remain High, CDC Says

Almost all toddlers in the United States are getting their recommended childhood vaccinations, despite some parents' concerns about giving so many shots to the very young in such a short period of time. A new government report shows immunization rates for many routine vaccines in 2011 were 90 percent or more among kids aged 19 months to 35 months. The breakdown: Coverage for the birth dose of hepatitis B increased from 64.1 percent in 2010 to 68.6 percent in 2011, coverage for the recommended two doses of hepatitis A vaccine increased from 49.7 percent to 52.2 percent in the same period, coverage for rotavirus vaccines increased from 59.2 percent to 67.3 percent and coverage for the full series of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine increased from 66.8 percent to 80.4 percent. To read more, click here

Poor Sleep Among Preschoolers May Be Tied to Special Ed Needs Later

New research suggests that sleep problems early in life may boost the risk of developmental disabilities by the age of 8. Researchers found that kids who suffered from problems like sleep apnea and snoring in their infant, toddler and preschool years were more likely to need special education services for conditions such as speech and behavioral problems a few years later. Although the study found an association between the two factors, it did not prove cause and effect. The higher risk of disabilities could be a statistical fluke, or something else besides sleep problems may explain it. Also, the results were limited because the children, all from England, were 98 percent white. To read more, click here

Social Exclusion On the Playground: Study Looks at Why Kids Say 'You Can't Play!'

Being the last one picked for the team, getting left out of the clique of cool girls, having no one to sit with at lunch. For children, social exclusion can impact everything from emotional well being to academic achievements. But what does it mean for the kids doing the excluding? Is the cure a one-size-fits-all approach that requires kids to include others, regardless of the situation at hand? Not necessarily, says new research from a professor now at Concordia University. Unlike previous studies where researchers created hypothetical situations and pre-selected the reasons for exclusion that kids could choose from, the Concordia study asked kids to talk about a time when they excluded a peer. To read more, click here

Traumatic Childhood May Increase the Risk of Drug Addiction

Previous research has shown that personality traits such as impulsivity or compulsiveness are indicators of an increased risk of addiction. Now, new research from the University of Cambridge suggests that these impulsive and compulsive personality traits are also associated with a traumatic upbringing during childhood. The study was published August 31, in the journal American Journal Psychiatry. Led by Dr Karen Ersche, the Cambridge researchers aimed to identify risk factors that make a person vulnerable to developing drug dependence. They examined 50 adults with cocaine dependence together with their biological brothers and sisters who have never abused drugs. All participants underwent extensive assessments of their personalities, including their ways of feeling and thinking. The researchers were also interested in negative experiences that participants may have had during childhood (to include physical, emotional or sexual abuse). To read more, click here

Concussions Can Happen in All Kids, Not Just Athletes

The gridiron is back in action. From little leagues to professional teams, football frenzy has begun, and with it, concerns about concussions. But it's not just jarring tackles that can lead to concussions in kids. According to Dr. Ryan Coates, pediatric neurologist at Loyola University Health System, there are many ways kids are exposed to concussion risks. "We hear a lot about concussions when it comes to sports and we should be on the lookout for head injuries, but athletes aren't the only ones who are at-risk for brain trauma," said Coates. Concussions are a result of a traumatic brain injury that causes a disruption of the brain function. Disruption of neurologic function can manifest itself with a multitude of symptoms, including headache, loss of consciousness, concentration and memory disturbances, dizziness, nausea/vomiting and confusion. To read more, click here

Almost Half of U.S. Kids With Autism Have Been Bullied

Nearly half of U.S. children with an autism spectrum disorder are victims of bullying, a new study finds. "The rate of bullying victimization among adolescents with an autism spectrum disorder is alarmingly high, indicating a profound public health problem in the United States," said lead researcher Paul Sterzing, an assistant professor at the School of Social Welfare of the University of California, Berkeley. Bullying among children and adolescents is common, and it's often the most vulnerable children who become targets, the researchers added. Sterzing's team found that about 46 percent of teens with an autism spectrum disorder had been bullied -- a much higher rate than the national average of less than 11 percent for other teens. To read more, click here

Did You Know That....

One of the most useful resources in the independent living area are the nationwide network of independent living centers (ILCs). ILCs are nonresidential, community-based agencies that are run by people with various disabilities. ILCs help people with disabilities achieve and maintain self-sufficient lives within the community. Operated locally, ILCs serve a particular region, which means that their services vary from place to place. ILCs may charge for classes, but advocacy services are typically available at no cost.

Bottle-Feeding May Raise Baby's Risk for Intestinal Trouble

Infants who are bottle-fed face a higher risk of developing a serious intestinal condition that can lead to surgery, Danish researchers report. With pyloric stenosis, the lower part of the baby's stomach narrows and restricts the amount of food the infant gets, and results in forceful vomiting, dehydration and salt and fluid imbalances. The reason it develops is unknown, but bottle-feeding has been suggested as a possible risk factor, the study authors noted. "Bottle-feeding is a rather strong risk factor for pyloric stenosis, and this adds to the evidence supporting the advantage of exclusive breast-feeding in the first months of life," said lead researcher Dr. Camilla Krogh, from the department of epidemiology research at the Statens Serum Institute in Copenhagen. To read more, click here

Children Taking Steroids for Asthma Are Slightly Shorter Than Peers, Study Finds

Children who use inhaled steroid drugs for asthma end up slightly shorter at their full adult height than children who don't use the drugs, new results from a comprehensive asthma study show. The study involved more than 1,000 children ages 5-12 who were treated for mild to moderate asthma as part of the Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP) clinical trial. The children received treatment for more than four years at eight centers, including Washington University School of Medicine. They were divided into three groups: one received twice-daily budesonide, an inhaled corticosteroid medication; a second group received nedocromil, an inhaled non-steroid medication; and a third group received a placebo. All children received albuterol, a fast-acting drug for relief of acute asthma symptoms, and oral corticosteroids as needed for asthma symptoms. To read more, click here

Job Woes Remain For People With Disabilities

For the fourth month in a row, the unemployment rate among people with disabilities crept higher in August, the U.S. Department of Labor said last Friday. The jobless rate hit 13.9 percent for Americans with disabilities in August, up from 13.6 percent the month prior. Meanwhile, the unemployment rate among the general population improved slightly, falling to 8.1 percent from 8.3 percent. To read more, click here

Food For Thought..........

I've failed over and over and over again in my life and that is why I succeed.

lost password?

Publications