Week in Review - April 6, 2012

WEEK IN REVIEW

New NASET Publications and Articles of Interest in Special Education and Disabilities That Were Reported This Week

April 6, 2012 - Vol 8, Issue 14


 

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In This Issue

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

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Dear NASET News,

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW Here, we provide you with the latest publications from NASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW atnews@naset.org. Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,


NASET News Team

AASEP Logo

NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

The Practical Teacher


Dignity, Function, & Choice: Ethical and Practical Considerations on Best Practices for Education Learners with Developmental Delays

In this opinion piece, written by J.A. Hyfler, the author offers considerations when educating individuals with developmental disabilities. Some of them we hold self-evident, but there has yet to be standardization, or guiding literature, of what should be normative when educating these learners. As such, the author is taking brief time to explore three concepts that need to be kept in mind when planning and executing a learners'education. The main concepts and questions explored are: Is the dignity of the learner intact at all times? Is the therapy or curriculum functional? And does the therapy of curriculum leave ample opportunities for the learner to make a choice? The author offers guidelines and examples of how to maintain these three core considerations that should be explored when looking at an exceptional learners' education.

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Parent Teacher Conference Handout


What are Related Services
Many times parents may not understand all of the services that their child with special needs is offered. While parents may indicate they understand, this Parent Teacher Conference Handout ensures that they walk away with the knowledge they need to understand this special education service.

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CDC Estimates 1 in 88 Children has Been Identified with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

CDC's National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities has been tracking ASDs for over a decade through the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network. The newest estimates from the ADDM Network are based on data collected in 14 areas of the United States during 2008. These 14 communities comprised over eight percent of the United States population of 8-year-olds in 2008. Information was collected on children who were 8 years old because previous work has shown that, by this age, most children with ASDs have been identified for services. To read more, click here

Did You Know That....

According to the latest data from the CDC, Autism Spectrum Disorders are almost 5 times more common among boys (1 in 54) than among girls (1 in 252).

Study Charts Dramatic Growth in ADHD Diagnoses Over Last 10 Years

The number children being diagnosed with ADHD-attention deficit hyperactivity disorder-is on the rise, a new study from Northwestern University has found. In 10 years, the number of ADHD diagnoses has risen 66 percent, researchers found, and over this time, more specialists, instead of primary-care physicians, have begun treating an increasing number of these young patients, researchers found. The study, published in the March/April issue of Academic Pediatrics, analyzed ADHD trends from 2000 to 2010 among children younger than 18 diagnosed and treated by office-based physicians. Researchers analyzed changes in the diagnosis of ADHD and treatment of the disorder. To read more, click here

AASEP Logo

NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

Standard Test May Miss Food Ingredients That Cause Milk Allergy

The standard test used to detect milk-protein residues in processed foods may not work as well as previously believed in all applications, sometimes missing ingredients that can cause milk allergy, the most common childhood food allergy, which affects millions of children under age 3, a scientist reported in San Diego at the 243rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society's (ACS) on March 29. Joseph L. Baumert, Ph.D., who headed the study, explained that thermal and non-thermal processing of foods can change the proteins responsible for milk allergy in ways that make the proteins harder to detect using the standard test, termed the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Processing, however, may still leave the milk proteins capable of causing itchy skin, runny eyes, wheezing and other sometimes more-serious symptoms of milk allergy, despite the inability to detect the milk residue. To read more, click here

Air Pollution from Trucks and Low-Quality Heating Oil May Explain Childhood Asthma Hot Spots

Where a child lives can greatly affect his or her risk for asthma. According to a new study by scientists at Columbia University, neighborhood differences in rates of childhood asthma may be explained by varying levels of air pollution from trucks and residential heating oil. Results appear online in the Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology. In New York City, where the study was conducted, asthma among school-age children ranges from a low of 3% to a high of 19% depending on the neighborhood, and even children growing up within walking distance of each other can have 2- to 3-fold differences in risk for asthma. Helping explain these disparities, the researchers found that levels of airborne black carbon, which mostly comes from incomplete combustion sources like diesel trucks and oil furnaces, were high in homes of children with asthma. They also reported elevated levels of black carbon within homes in neighborhoods with high asthma prevalence and high densities of truck routes and homes burning low-grade or "dirty" heating oil. To read more, click here

Did You Know That....

According to the latest data from the CDC,
more children are being diagnosed with autism at earlier ages-a growing number of them by age 3. Still, most children are not diagnosed until after they reach age 4, even though early identification and intervention can help a child access services and learn new skills

Lehigh University Special Education Law Symposium, June 24-29, 2012

Lehigh University's intensive week-long special education law symposium provides a practical analysis of legislation, regulations, and case law relating to the education of students with disabilities. The symposium provides a thorough analysis of the leading issues under the IDEA and Section 504. Special features include: parallel tracks for basic and advanced practitioners, starting with a keynote dinner and presentation by Dr. Alexa Posny, Assistant Secretary, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, U.S. Department of Education, and ending with a post-luncheon crystal-ball session  by Chicago attorney Darcy Kriha; a balance of knowledgeable district, parent, and neutral perspectives; essential topics with proven effective presenters for the basic track; and a brand new set of "hot topics" and faculty presenters for the advanced track. For more information visit http://www.lehigh.edu/education/law. Questions? Contact Tamara Bartolet (tlp205@lehigh.edu or 610/758-3226).

Growth in the Womb and Early Infancy Predicts Bone Size and Strength in Childhood

Results may help to understand ways in which early growth can be optimised to reduce the risk of osteoporotic fracture in older age. Researchers from the MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, recently presented evidence that early growth predicts the size, mineralisation, shape and strength of the hip bone in childhood. The study, led by Dr Nicholas Harvey, Senior Lecturer at the MRC LEU, recruited 493 mothers and their offspring from the Southampton Women's Survey, a unique study of mothers and their children. Using high resolution ultrasound, growth of the baby in the womb was measured from 11 weeks to 34 weeks gestation. After birth the infant's length/height was measured at birth, 6, 12, 24, 36 and 48 months enabling speed of growth over these times to be calculated. Hip size, density and shape at 6 years were assessed using bone density scanning (DEXA) and special hip structure analysis software. To read more, click here

NASET Sponsor - Mayer-Johnson

MJ-2-2012

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NASET Sponsor - PENN STATE ONLINE

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TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Guess the answer to this week's trivia question and we'll recognize you in next week's Week in Review.
Congratulations to:

Joanie Dikeman, Prahbhjot Malhi, Carol Kramp, Louise Janus, Karen Sanford, Alexandra Pirard, Chaya Tabor, Craig Pate, Vicky Gill, Erica Lindberg, Maria Carla O. Sangalang, Rebecca S. Birrenkott, Heather Shyrer, Laura Anderson, Norma Harris, Cheryl Gillette, Kerry Scheetz, Meg Phillips, Suzann Armitage, Gabrielle Frazier, Maricel Bustos, Olumide Akerele, Deanna Krieg, Lauara Hayes, Jan Wixon, Aimee Veith, Andrew Bailey,Marilyn Haile, Margot Connor, Tanya VanLancker, Jessica L. Ulmer, Elena Ghionis, Patricia A. Williams, Marlene Damery, Elaine Draper, Mike Namian, Mary Roberts, and Kathy Dobis who all knew the answer to last week's trivia question: Bert Holbrook was recognized as the world's oldest living man with Down Syndrome.



THIS WEEK'S TRIVIA QUESTION:
In 1972, what reporter conducted a series of investigations at Willowbrook State School in New York uncovering a host of deplorable conditions, including overcrowding, inadequate sanitary facilities, and physical and sexual abuse of residents by members of the school's staff? (The exposé, entitled Willowbrook: The Last Disgrace, garnered national attention and won a Peabody Award)

If you know the answer, send an email to contactus@naset.org
All answers must be submitted no later than Monday, April 9, 2012 at 12:00 p.m.

How Indiana Took Sides In A Debate Over Deaf Schools

Members of the deaf community have long debated whether deaf students should use medical hearing devices and be mainstreamed into the hearing culture, or whether they should be enrolled in schools that provide a more specialized education and promote the use of sign language. In Indiana, that debate has come to a head in public schools serving the state's hearing-impaired students. The state is starting to pull resources away from the Indiana School for the Deaf, known as the ISD, because some say the school is too biased toward sign language. To read more, click here

School Bans Girl with Cerebral Palsy from Using Walker

Kristi Roberts was stunned when school officials insisted that her 5-year-old daughter switch to a wheelchair from the walker she'd been using for the previous two years. Little LaKay had battled cerebral palsy and epilepsy since she was born, and Kristi had worked hard to get her little girl up out of the wheel chair and walking - she couldn't believe that the school was now taking away their hard-earned progress. Kristi explained her position to NBC's Janet Shamlian. "If she can walk now, please let her walk," Kristi said. "Don't strap her in a wheelchair. We've worked so hard. She has worked so hard." To read more, click here

Disability Advocates Alarmed By Parents Who Kill

After a number of cases in recent years of parents killing their kids with disabilities, self-advocates are working to focus attention on victims rather than the stresses their caregivers face. Members of the Autistic Self Advocacy Network say that far too often parents who kill their children with disabilities receive sympathy while little is said of the victim. In response, the group is planning a national day of mourning this Friday. Self-advocates in a dozen cities are on board to host candlelight vigils where they will read victims' names and draw attention to how these deaths are treated in the media and by the public. To read more, click here

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People With Autism May Be Better at Processing Information

People with autism have an enhanced ability to process information, which may explain the apparently higher-than-average percentage of people with autism who work in the information technology industry, British researchers say. Along with this heightened capacity for processing information, people with autism are better able to detect information that is considered critical, according to the study, which appeared March 22 in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology. Autism spectrum disorders include a range of neurodevelopmental disorders, all marked by difficulties with social and communication skills and repetitive behaviors. To read more, click here

Should Patients with Cystic Fibrosis Get So Many Antibiotics?

Antibiotics can prolong cystic fibrosis patients' lives, but the drugs also help treatment-resistant bacteria thrive in their lungs, a new, small study suggests. The findings from the 10-year investigation suggest, but do not prove, that the current standard of aggressive antibiotic treatment for cystic fibrosis patients may not always be the best approach. It's common to use antibiotics to control infection in cystic fibrosis patients' lungs, but maintaining a more diverse range of bacteria in the lungs may help some patients stay healthy longer, according to study senior author Dr. John LiPuma, a research professor of pediatrics and communicable diseases at the University of Michigan Medical School in Ann Arbor. To read more, click here

Thailand Takes First Steps on Long Road to Inclusive Mainstream Education

The strict hierarchy of Thai society means the drive for inclusive education needs strong commitment from both politicians and school leaders. In the past decade, there has been significant political progress in moves to implement a system that ensures children with disabilities have access to mainstream schools. However, with cultural barriers and resistance from some headteachers, the journey towards fully inclusive education has only just begun. "Even when I offered to work for free, they still could not be convinced," explains Paul Lennon, a British ex-pat whose son was born with Down's syndrome. When he started looking for mainstream schools for his son in Chanthaburi province six years ago, headteachers in the local area refused him a place. Yet the National Educational Act, passed in 1999 - and accompanied by posters declaring: "Any disabled person who wishes to go to school can do so" - supposedly guaranteed all disabled children access to state education. To read more, click here

Did You Know That....

The increase in the number of children with autism marks a 23% increase from the prior report of the CDC in 2009

Heavier Baby Girls at Higher Risk for Diabetes, Heart Woes as Adults

Overweight female babies are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes in adulthood, a new study suggests. Researchers looked at more than 1,000 17-year-olds in Australia who had been followed since birth. The goal was to examine whether birth weight and body fat distribution in early childhood was associated with future health risk factors such as obesity, insulin resistance and high blood pressure. The study found that teen girls with larger waist circumference, higher levels of insulin and triglycerides (a type of fat found in the blood), and lower levels of "good" HDL cholesterol were heavier from birth than other girls. To read more, click here

Oklahoma's Special Education Vouchers Ruled Unconstitutional

A state district judge in Oklahoma has ruled that a private school voucher program just for students with disabilities is unconstitutional. Reports by the Associated Press and Tulsa Worldsay that Judge Rebecca Nightingale agreed with the school districts that the law violates an Oklahoma constitutional prohibition of public money being used directly or indirectly for any sectarian institution. Two school districts sued parents of six children with disabilities last fall over the Lindsey Nicole Henry Scholarships program. The scholarship program, created in 2010, initially required districts to administer the vouchers. Several districts refused to do so, and they were sued by parents. The districts eventually countersued. To read more, click here

Two-Thirds of Kids With Autism Have Been Bullied: Study

Nearly two-thirds of American children with autism have been bullied at some point in their lives, and these kids are bullied three times more often than their siblings without autism, a new survey finds. Bullying occurs in every grade but is worst in grades five through eight, with 42 percent to 49 percent of students with autism spectrum disorders in those grades bullied, according to a survey of nearly 1,200 parents of children with autism aged 6 to 15. To read more, click here

Food For Thought..........

The function of education is to teach one to think intensively and to think critically. Intelligence plus character - that is the goal of true education.
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