Week in Review - March 23, 2012

WEEK IN REVIEW

New NASET Publications and Articles of Interest in Special Education and Disabilities That Were Reported This Week

March 23, 2012 - Vol 8, Issue 12

 

 

Find us on Facebook 

 

Forward this issue to a Friend

 

Join Our Mailing List!

 

In This Issue

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

 
Quick Links
Read Week in Review on NASET -Click Here

 

Renew Your Membership on NASET -Click Here  (login required)

 

 NASET Resources - Click Here

 

NASET e-Publications - Click Here

 

Forgot your User Name or Password? - Click Here

 

Update/Manage Your Member Profile - Click Here (login required)

 
 

Dear NASET News,

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW Here, we provide you with the latest publications from NASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW atnews@naset.org. Have a great weekend.
 
Sincerely,


NASET News Team

 

 
AASEP Logo

NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.  

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here
 
 

IEP Components


Service Delivery and Transition Planning

This issue of NASET's IEP Component Series, takes a look at service delivery and transition planning.  Simply stated, service delivery defines the projected date for the beginning of the services and modifications described in paragraph (a)(4) of this section, and the anticipated frequency, location, and duration of those services and modifications. Transition planning is a gigantic topic and a very important one for youth with disabilities, their families, and IEP teams. NASET has already devoted an entire section of its website to the subject. Here, in this series, however, we'll keep it short and focused on what IDEA requires in the IEP for transition-aged students.


To read or download this issue - Click here  (login required)
______________________________________________________

Resource Review

March 2013 
In this issue you will find resources in the following areas:

  • Bullying
  • Common Core Standards
  • Early Intervention
  • Families and Community Resources
  • Health Data and Disabilities
  • High School Dropouts
  • IDEA/504
  • Jobless
  • Participation Requests
  • Reading Instruction
  • Response to Intervention
  • Self Determination
  • Technology
  • Testing Accommodations
  • Transition Services

To read or download this issue - Click here  (login required)

 

NASET Sponsor - Mayer-Johnson

 MJ-2-2012

To learn more - Click here
 

With Spanking, Nature and Nurture Create More Aggression, Study Suggests

Using spanking as a method of discipline for kids who have a genetic predisposition to aggressive behavior likely makes them even more aggressive, especially boys, new research suggests. "There's an intricate interplay between nature and nurture," said study co-author J.C. Barnes, an assistant professor of criminology at the University of Texas at Dallas School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences. "Most people know that genes matter, but genes and environment can coalesce, and we see things above and beyond what's expected." To read more, click here

 

Did You Know That....

A balance disorder is a condition that makes someone feel unsteady or dizzy, as if the person is moving, spinning, or floating, even though he or she is standing still or lying down. Balance disorders can be caused by certain health conditions, medications, or a problem in the inner ear or the brain.
 

NASET Sponsor - Penn State Online

 PS Online

To learn more - Click here
 

Children at Risk for Schizophrenia Show Disordered Brain Networks in Childhood, Adolescence, Researchers Say

A team of neuroscientists led by a Wayne State University School of Medicine professor has discovered stark developmental differences in brain network function in children of parents with schizophrenia when compared to those with no family history of mental illness. The study, led by Vaibhav Diwadkar, Ph.D., assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral neurosciences and co-director of the Division of Brain Research and Imaging Neuroscience, was published in the March 2012 issue of the American Medical Association journal Archives of General Psychiatry and is titled, "Disordered Corticolimbic Interactions During Affective Processing in Children and Adolescents at Risk for Schizophrenia Revealed by Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Dynamic Causal Modeling." To read more, click here

 

AASEP Logo

NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.  

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here
 

Multiple Sclerosis Study Documents Negative Effect of Warmer Weather On Cognition

Kessler Foundation scientists have shown for the first time that outdoor temperature significantly affects cognitive functioning in multiple sclerosis (MS). While it is recognized that disease activity increases during warmer months, this is the first study to document that cognition also fluctuates. During warmer outdoor temperatures patients with MS performed worse on tasks involving processing speed and memory. An estimated 50 to 65% of people with MS experience problems with thinking, learning and remembering that can be disabling. According to the results, cognitive performance may be a more sensitive indicator of subclinical disease activity than traditional assessments. To read more, click here

 

Giving Birth to Small Babies Linked to Heart Disease in Moms

Women who deliver full-term infants with low birth weights have nearly double the risk of developing ischemic heart disease, a new study says. These types of pregnancies may cause long-term cardiovascular changes that increase a mother's risk for heart disease, according to the researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. Ischemic heart disease affects the supply of blood to the heart. The researchers analyzed data from more than 6,600 women who took part in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 1999 and 2006. To read more, click here

 

Scientists Tap the Cognitive Genius of Tots to Make Computers Smarter

People often wonder if computers make children smarter. Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, are asking the reverse question: Can children make computers smarter? And the answer appears to be 'yes.' UC Berkeley researchers are tapping the cognitive smarts of babies, toddlers and preschoolers to program computers to think more like humans. If replicated in machines, the computational models based on baby brainpower could give a major boost to artificial intelligence, which historically has had difficulty handling nuances and uncertainty, researchers said. To read more, click here

 

Did You Know That....

A balance disorder may be caused by viral or bacterial infections in the ear, a head injury, or blood circulation disorders that affect the inner ear or brain. Many people experience problems with their sense of balance as they get older. Balance problems and dizziness also can result from taking certain medications.
 

NASET Sponsor - Penn State Online

 PS Online

To learn more - Click here
 

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Guess the answer to this week's trivia question and we'll recognize you in next week's Week in Review.
  

Congratulations to: Deanna Krieg, Barbara Kempf, Suzann Armitage, Vicky Gill, Victoria Vila, Gayleen Moeller, Joanie Dikeman, Debra Mueller, Olumide Akerele, Chaya Tabor, Rebecca S. Birrenkott, Stacey Slintak, Jessica L. Ulmer, Lois Nembhard, Craig Pate, Marilyn Haile, and Prahbhjot Malhi who all knew the answer to last wee's trivia question: According to the National Institute of Health, the chance of having a baby with Down syndrome increases as a woman gets older-from about 1 in 1,250 for a woman who gets pregnant at age 25, to about 1 in 100 for a woman who gets pregnant at age 40.



THIS WEEK'S TRIVIA QUESTION: 
According to the latest data collected by the U.S. Department of Education's office for civil rights, what do 433,980 students have?
 
If you know the answer, send an email to contactus@naset.org 
All answers must be submitted no later than Monday, March 26, 2012 at 12:00 p.m.

 

Stressed Parents May Affect Preemie Behavior Later

When parents of very small premature infants are stressed or depressed, their children are more likely to develop behavioral problems by age 3, according to new research. What's more, the worse the parents scored on psychological well-being indicators, the more likely their youngsters were to develop the problems. "The psychological well-being of both parents is a significant contributor on the behavioral and emotional development of preterm children," said study lead author Dr. Mira Huhtala, a researcher at Turku University Hospital in Finland. To read more, click here

 

Research Aims for Better Diagnosis of Language Impairments

Recent studies by a UT Dallas researcher aim at finding better ways to diagnose young children with language impairments. Dr. Christine Dollaghan, a professor at the Callier Center for Communication Disorders and the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, is author of a paper in the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research. The study evaluated data collected from a large sample of about 600 children. Some of the participants had specific language impairments, or SLI. She wanted to deterimine whether SLI should be regarded as a discrete diagnostic category. To read more, click here

 

Fetal Exposure to Cellphone Radiation Tied to ADHD-Like Symptoms in Mice

In experiments involving mice, fetal exposure to cellphone radiation appeared linked to symptoms in offspring that resemble attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in human children, Yale researchers report. Moreover, these problems with attention, hyperactivity and memory continued when the mice became adults and were worse the longer they were exposed to cellphone radiation in the womb, the researchers said. "The hypothesis was that the developing brain might be more susceptible to these types of insults," said senior researcher Dr. Hugh Taylor, a professor and chief of the division of reproductive endocrinology and infertility in the department of obstetrics, gynecology & reproductive sciences.  To read more, click here

 
 

NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Group Savings Plus from Liberty Mutual

Liberty Mutual Savings
As a member of NASET you qualify for a special group discount* on your auto, home, and renter's insurance through Group Savings Plus® from Liberty Mutual. This unique program allows you to purchase high-quality auto, home and renters insurance at low group rates.

 

See for yourself how much money you could save with Liberty Mutual compared to your current insurance provider. For a free, no-obligation quote, call 800-524-9400 or visit

www.libertymutual.com/naset, or visit your local sales office.

*Group discounts, other discounts, and credits are available where state laws and regulations allow, and may vary by state.  Certain discounts apply to specific coverage only.  To the extent permitted by law, applicants are individually underwritten; not all applicants may qualify.  Coverage provided and underwritten by Liberty Mutual Insurance Company and its affiliates, 175 Berkeley Street, Boston, MA.

 

Exercise Might Boost Kids' Academic Ability

Promoting physical activity among young school kids can end up improving their academic performance, a new study suggests. Italian researchers tracked 138 children aged 8 through 11 who took mental acuity tests under a series of conditions that sometimes involved physical activity and sometimes did not. "Schoolteachers frequently claim that students lose attention and concentration with prolonged periods of academic instruction," first study author Maria Chiara Gallotta, at the University of Rome, said in a news release. "The key elements of learning, particularly important during development, are attention and concentration. Our study examined the relationship between exertion and the attention and concentration levels of schoolchildren." To read more, click here

 

White Rice Increases Risk of Type 2 Diabetes, Study Claims

The risk of type 2 diabetes is significantly increased if white rice is eaten regularly. The authors from the Harvard School of Public Health look at previous studies and evidence of the association between eating white rice and the risk of type 2 diabetes. Their study seeks to determine whether this risk is dependent on the amount of rice consumed and if the association is stronger for the Asian population, who tend to eat more white rice than the Western world. The authors analyzed the results of four studies: two in Asian countries (China and Japan) and two in Western countries (USA and Australia). All participants were diabetes free at study baseline. To read more, click here

 

Childhood Leukemia Survival Rates Reach 90 Percent

Children with the most common type of leukemia now have a dramatically better chance of survival, a new study shows. The researchers found five-year survival rates among children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) increased from about 84 percent to 90 percent from 1990 to 2005. Surviving for five years is considered a cure because so few deaths occur past that timeframe. "We're talking about a disease that was incurable 50 years ago," said study author Dr. Stephen Hunger. "Now we see a 90 percent cure rate. That's pretty remarkable." The study is published in the March 12 online issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology. To read more,click here

 

New ADA Rules Leave Some Scrambling

As a new round of accessibility requirements took effect this week, some businesses are struggling to comply. The new regulations are part of a 2010 update to the Americans with Disabilities Act. Businesses were given until this year to adhere to many of the added requirements. Starting last Thursday, rules will be in place for the first time ever mandating that public swimming pools, parks, golf courses, exercise clubs and other recreational facilities be accessible. Hotel reservation systems also must meet new standards. To read more, click here

 

Did You Know That....

To help evaluate a balance problem, a doctor may suggest a person see an otolaryngologist. An otolaryngologist is a physician and surgeon who specializes in the ear, nose, and throat. An otolaryngologist may request tests to assess the cause and extent of the balance problem depending on the individual's symptoms and health status.
 

The World's Oldest Living Man with Down Syndrome Dies at Age 83

Bert Holbrook, a southern Minnesota native who defied medical odds to become the world's oldest living man with Down syndrome, has died at age 83. Holbrook died Wednesday night at his group home in Waseca, said nurse Pat Foley, who attributed his death to natural causes. "He lived in that era when you'd expect him to only live into his 40s," Foley said. In November 2008, Holbrook was listed by Guinness World Records as "currently the oldest fully authenticated male" with Down syndrome. To read more, click here

 

Scientists Disagree on Need for Rewrite of Autism Definition

The author of a study that could result in a change to the definition of autism, one that could exclude many people from being diagnosed as autistic, now says more study is needed before the definition is adjusted. In a recent piece for New Scientist magazine, Dr. Fred Volkmar of Yale University explains that the current definition of autism was based on a study he did in 1994. "Controversially, it also included several newly identified disorders such as Asperger's and ... 'pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified' (PDD-NOS), for those who did not quite meet criteria for a full autism diagnosis but needed similar support," Dr. Volkmar wrote. To read more, click here

 

Report on Necessity of Restraints, Seclusion 'Reckless,' Advocates Say

A new report from the American Association of School Administrators about the importance of being able to restrain and seclude some students in the interest of school safety has outraged some disability advocacy groups. The AASA report, "Keeping Schools Safe: How Seclusion and Restraint Protects Students and School Personnel," describes scenarios in which parents said without the use of these methods, they may have had to institutionalize their children. The report also describes scenarios in which students injured school employees so badly they needed emergency medical care. To read more, click here

 

Food For Thought..........

It is not what is poured into a student that counts but what is planted.

                                                                                    Linda Conway

lost password?

Publications