Week in Review - July 1, 2011

WEEK IN REVIEW

New NASET Publications and Articles of Interest in Special Education and Disabilities That Were Reported This Week

July 1, 2011 - Vol 7, Issue 23

 

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In This Issue
New This Week on NASET
Rising Enrollments of Students with Disabilities at Higher Education Institutions
Learning Empathy by Looking Beyond Disabilities
Antipsychotics Change Metabolism in Children
Support and Services Lacking for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
'Pump It Up' Accommodates Children with Autism
Gestures May Play Role in Diagnosis of Autism
Sleep Disorder Could Make Kids Bullies
TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK
People with Disabilities Often Face Uphill Custody Battles
Special Olympics 2011: Including the Most Excluded
Doubts Cast on Concussion Remedies
Special Education Cuts Offer Cautionary Tale
Young People with Type 1 Diabetes at Risk for Heart Disease
Nation's Largest Merit Pay Program Loses Out to Budget
Schools Blend Computers with Classroom Learning
Oxytocin Promises Hope in Prader-Willi Syndrome
Summer Educators 'Mix Up' Learning with Technology
Vitamin A Deficiency Does Not Affect Onset of Asthma, Study Suggests
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No More Bullies at the North Pole

 

Bullies at the North Pole? Absolutely!!! This book addresses unfair behavior at Santa's North Pole. Special Education Teachers should find this book a valuable resource for class discussions on many unfair issues that can be devastating to children such as bullying, rejection, conformity and other problem behaviors. CGRC Publishing Co. is offering this book to NASET members at absolutely no charge. By clicking on the link below, NASET members can download a complimentary copy of the book, to be read and shared with their students. All that is asked of you in return is that, after reading the book, you take a moment to send an email to cgrcpublishing@gmail.com with your evaluation, reactions and/or opinions, both positive and negative. Click on the link to receive your complimentary copy.


New This Week on NASET

NASET Special Educator e-Journal


In this issue:

Update from the U.S. Department Education
Calls to Participate
Special Education Resources
Update From The National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities
Latest Employment Opportunities Posted on NASET
Upcoming Conferences and Events
Funding Forecast and Award Opportunities.


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Rising Enrollments of Students with Disabilities at Higher Education Institutions

College and other post-secondary enrollments of students with disabilities continue to rise in the United States - with 88 percent of the institutions reporting enrolling students with disabilities in the 2008-2009 school years. This, coupled with recent legislation including the Americans with Disabilities Act, has generated significant interest in research on how accessible higher education opportunities are for those students with disabilities. Researchers defined a disability as a mental or physical condition that causes functional limitations which affect major life activities, such as communication, mobility and learning. This report represents only students who identified themselves as having a disability to their institution; those are the only students with disabilities that a higher education institution can report on. The study found that, for the 2008-09 academic year, 88 percent of two-year and four-year Title IV Federal Student Aid granting programs reported enrolling students with disabilities. Additionally, 99 percent of all public two-year and four-year institutions reported enrolling students with disabilities. To read more, click here

Learning Empathy by Looking Beyond Disabilities

Students at Ridgewood High School were shown photos of young people with genetic disorders - muscular dystrophy, albinism, port-wine stains - and told not to look away. Then, those studying philosophy wrote essays about the meaning of beauty. A ninth-grade biology class went beyond textbook definitions of Turner and Marfan syndromes, communicating with real people to see how they lived with their symptoms. And a dance class created a piece about people with disabilities, in which dancers broke away one by one to perform in isolation. "It was kind of shocking, because you felt yourself judging right away," said Madison Konner, 18, a senior in the philosophy and dance classes. "You say, 'There's a boy with a funny face, ha ha.' But you find out later he can't help it." To read more, click here

Did You Know That....

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that food allergy affects 5 percent of children under the age of 5 and 4 percent of children aged 5 to 17 years and adults in the United States

 

Antipsychotics Change Metabolism in Children

Antipsychotics appear to increase body fat and increase the risk of metabolic abnormalities in children and adolescents, researchers said here. Those taking atypical antipsychotics for three months had significant increases in body weight and insulin resistance over baseline, John Newcomer, MD, of the University of Washington, and colleagues reported at the American Diabetes Association meeting here. "These are changes that are associated with increased cardiovascular disease and diabetes risk," Newcomer said. Adult studies have shown that antipsychotics increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and death, and researchers have expressed concern over these outcomes in children, who are increasingly treated with these medications -- particularly for non-psychotic disorders like attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism. To read more, click here

Support and Services Lacking for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Fifty years ago, President Kennedy made a call to the nation to help bring people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) out of the shadows and give them opportunities to lead productive, quality lives. Despite gains in many areas, more progress must be made to create these opportunities. The Arc, the nation's largest and oldest human rights organization for the I/DD community, conducted a national survey, Families and Individual Needs for Disability Supports (FINDS), to learn from caregivers of people with I/DD if their loved ones are faring well in school, the workplace and throughout their lives. The survey questioned whether the I/DD population receives the support services, funding and resources they need and deserve to lead fully integrated lives. According to the FINDS survey, 62 percent of caregivers report a decrease in services for their family member with disability. To read more, click here

Did You Know That....

There are eight major food allergens in the United States-milk, egg, peanut, tree nuts, soy, wheat, fish, and crustacean shellfish.

'Pump It Up' Accommodates Children with Autism

The nation's largest indoor inflatable playground, Pump It Up recently started making accommodations for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. More than 150 Pump It Upplaygrounds across the country are giving children with autism sensory jump time. It's an opportunity for them to be in a safe environment while having a lot of fun. At Chicago's Lincoln Park Pump It Up, 5-year-old Ivan is making his way around the inflatable playground. Mom Martha Fregoso said her son was diagnosed with autism just after his second birthday. "A couple of things that we've noticed was just his development, he wasn't speaking very well for his age. He had a lot of sensory issues so we had a lot of issues with adjusting with the environment sounds," Fregoso said. This is challenging for young kids like Ivan, to do simple things like play with peers. To read more, click here

Gestures May Play Role in Diagnosis of Autism

Researchers in Melbourne working on a long-term study of 1900 children found those with autism used fewer gestures to communicate than other kids. Speech pathologist Carly Veness, who led the research, said there was a pattern of low gesture use among autistic children between the ages of eight months and two years. "We found that there was a decreased use of gestures like pointing, showing and giving," she said. "At two years of age that was the main characteristic that differentiated children with autism from other children. "These findings could really revolutionise how autism is screened for and help professionals come to an earlier diagnosis." To read more, click here

Sleep Disorder Could Make Kids Bullies

Sleep disorders could result in children becoming bullies, according to a recent study. Sleep disorder could be one of the reasons for kids to be more bullying to others, according to a recent study. The study, which was published in the journal Sleep Medicine, is based on data collected from over 300 schools in Michigan, and focuses on elementary school children. The researchers surveyed the parents and teachers of the children, and used this data to evaluate and match kids' sleeping patterns and link it to health and other problems. It has been known for a while that sleeping disorders and lack of sleep are associated with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), a neurobehavioral disorder which results in inattentive, overactive and impulsive children. But this is among the first studies that have directly linked sleep disorder to bullying. To read more, click here

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Guess the answer to this week's trivia question and we'll recognize you in next week's Week in Review.
Congratulations to: Phyllis Wilson, Conrad Bell, Diana Peterson, Catherine Cardenas, Christie Miller, Anitra Allen-King, Jessica L. Ulmer, Carolann Hampton
who knew that PART C of IDEIA addresses Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities?

THIS WEEK'S TRIVIA QUESTION:

Fill in the blank:  In the past, annual goals in a student's IEP were paired with short-term objectives or benchmarks of progress. With the 2004 Amendments to IDEIA, this requirement has been removed. Now, benchmarks or short-term objectives are required only for children with disabilities who take ________.

If you know the answer, send an email to contactus@naset.org
All answers must be submitted no later than Monday, July 4, 2011 at 12:00 p.m.

People with Disabilities Often Face Uphill Custody Battles

The process of sorting out contested child-custody or visitation arrangements is almost always hard on families. And, individuals with disabilities commonly face additional challenges in these circumstances. The story of one California mother and her parents demonstrates these challenges as they fight to prove in court that even severely disabled parents have the right to see their children. In 2006, Abbie Dorn was paralyzed following several medical errors during the process of giving birth to triplets. She was left unable to speak or move, but her parents insist that Abbie is able to hear and see, and that she can answer yes or no questions through blinking signals. According to the Los Angeles Times, a neurologist testified that Abbie can perceive sounds and images. Even though Abbie was disabled bringing her children into the world, her ex-husband, Don Dorn, does not think their two boys and girl should be allowed to visit their mother. He argues that spending extensive time with their motionless mother would be traumatic for the young children, and he believes Abbie has no chance of recovery. But, after a visit in December, 2011, even Don conceded that the children indicated a desire to see Abbie again. To read more, click here

Special Olympics 2011: Including the Most Excluded

Last week, thousands of athletes from around the world have gathered in Greece for the Special Olympics World Summer Games 2011. Like all Olympians, these young people are ready to test their skills and strength against their peers in athletic competition. Win or lose, they have all traveled a long road to reach these Games. But for far too many disadvantaged children living with disabilities, the road to reach their full potential has no end yet in sight. Back when Special Olympics was founded 40 years ago, the idea of giving children and adults with disabilities a chance to compete in a public forum was radical. But thanks to the vision of Eunice and Sargent Shriver -- and the passion and perseverance of those first athletes -- Special Olympics took off on winged feet, the proud symbol of a growing global movement to secure equal rights for people with disabilities. To read more, click here

Doubts Cast on Concussion Remedies

To help protect their brains, athletes are now given preseason computer tests that assess memory, concentration and reaction time. Some players don helmets with "concussion reduction technology" or use special mouth guards that promise to "prevent concussions and head injuries." Others pop pills promising to improve the brain's resistance to injury or help it recover faster. As concerns mount over the dangers of concussions, especially in youngsters whose brains are still developing, so does the demand for products that purport to help diagnose the mild traumatic brain injury, reduce the risks or prevent it from happening altogether. To read more, click here

Special Education Cuts Offer Cautionary Tale

South Carolina officials cut millions from the state's special education budget over the last two years without federal approval. Now, they must restore the money or risk losing significant funding from Washington. Under federal law, states cannot decrease funding for special education from one year to the next. But in cases of "exceptional or uncontrollable circumstances" the U.S. Department of Education can grant one-year waivers. South Carolina is one of seven states that requested waivers in recent years on the heels of the financial crisis, citing budget shortfalls. A 2009 waiver request from the state was approved and a request last year was partially successful. Now, however, federal officials are saying enough is enough. To read more, click here

Young People with Type 1 Diabetes at Risk for Heart Disease

New research shows that adolescents and young adults with type 1 (juvenile) diabetes have thicker and stiffer carotid arteries, also known as atherosclerosis, a risk factor for heart attack and stroke in adults. This research is believed to be the first to examine whether type 1 diabetes has a measurable effect on carotid arteries in this age group. The research is part of The SEARCH CVD Study, a collaborative effort between investigators at the Colorado School of Public Health and the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. Dana Dabelea, MD, PhD, an epidemiologist at the University of Colorado and principal investigator said "We hope that the knowledge provided by the research study will translate into better quality of care and better quality of life for youth with type 1 diabetes and will reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease in this patient population." To read more, click here

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NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.
For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

Nation's Largest Merit Pay Program Loses Out to Budget

The largest teacher merit pay program in the nation is no more, reduced to a shell of its former self after having 90 percent of its funding slashed in the Texas budget crunch. About 180,000 teachers-more than half the state's total-will receive bonus checks this fall for their work in the just concluded school year. But over the next two years, when state funding plummets, there will be enough money for only 18,000 to receive bonuses. Originally trumpeted by Gov. Rick Perry and legislative leaders as the wave of the future in public education, the program fell victim to the scaled-back budget approved by the Legislature and signed by the governor last week. The state is spending $392 million in the current two-year budget on the District Awards for Teacher Excellence program but will have just $40 million for it in the next one. To read more,click here

Schools Blend Computers with Classroom Learning

Many school districts are reluctantly cutting staff and dropping courses in a desperate effort to respond to tighter budgets. But some educators are looking at ways to save money and improve instruction at the same time. The answer for some schools: blended learning, which is part computer lesson, part classroom instruction. KIPP Empower Academy in South Los Angeles has had to make virtue out of dire necessity. Just as this nationwide network of charter schools was opening up a new kindergarten here, the amount of state money began to dry up. Principal Mike Kerr says he saw only one way out: raising class size. To read more, click here

Did You Know That....

Most children eventually outgrow milk, egg, soy, and wheat allergy. Fewer children outgrow peanut and tree nuts allergy. Outgrowing a childhood allergy may occur as late as the teenage years.

Oxytocin Promises Hope in Prader-Willi Syndrome

Prader-Willi syndrome is a rare genetic disorder which affects one child in 25,000. Children born with this syndrome have a range of complex neurological and developmental problems which continue into adult life. These can manifest as cognitive and behavioral difficulties, weight gain, problems in controlling their temper and attendant difficulties in socialization. New research published in BioMed Central's open access journal Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases,demonstrates that the hormone oxytocin is able to positively affect patients by improving trust, mood, and reducing disruptive behavior. To read more, click here

Summer Educators 'Mix Up' Learning with Technology

Educators are rethinking how best to use the summer to help students improve academic proficiency rather than lose a grip on it-especially students who struggle academically or lack access to educational resources during the break. And teachers are finding technology, if harnessed correctly, can play a crucial role. Schools may offer a fully virtual program targeting one or two subjects, for example, or a broader summer academy that incorporates bits and pieces of technology to blend summer school with summer camp. Regardless of the format, some educators find that technology gives them the opportunity to make instruction more flexible and personalized than it is during a school year bound by curricula and state testing requirements-and they're zestfully embracing it. To read more, click here

Vitamin A Deficiency Does Not Affect Onset of Asthma, Study Suggests

Vitamin A deficiency does not increase the risk of asthma, according to new research published online in the European Respiratory Journal. In developing countries, vitamin A deficiency is particularly common and previous research has shown that it harms the development of the lungs. This study aimed to assess whether vitamin A deficiency influences the development of asthma later in life. To read more, click here

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Food For Thought..........

 

Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.

Winston Churchill

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