Week in Review - November 22, 2019


NASET

WEEK IN REVIEW

National Association of Special Education Teachers

November 22, 2019                     Vol 15 Issue #47


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Dear NASET Members and Guests,


Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW.  Here, we provide you with the latest publications fromNASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW at news@naset.org. Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,


NEW THIS WEEK ON NASET

NASET's Autism Spectrum Disorder Series

The Effectiveness of Visual Supports for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder


This issues of NASET's Autism Spectrum Disorder series was written by Sofia M. Borron. A review of literature was completed for articles to evaluate the result of using visual supports for students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Children with ASD may display varied social and behavior challenges that affect transitions. Four different research articles that have been peer-reviewed and are academic journals assess the effectiveness of visual prompts for students with ASD. Read More


Fire Stations Add Sensory Bags for Patients with Autism in Ohio 

The Clearcreek Township Fire Department has added sensory bags to help firefighters and paramedics when they respond to a scene involving someone on the autism spectrum. Firefighter and paramedic Eric Henry was the brainchild behind the department's new addition and did research into what items would help first responders to calm a child or adult with autism. "We were sitting there talking about them visiting the fire department one day and I was thinking about how we were equipped to deal with autistic people within our community," Henry said. "We have a lot of children that we're going to interact with all the time and there is a high probability that we're going to run into someone with autism." Read More



Study Finds Links Between Early Screen Exposure, Sleep Disruption and EBD in Kids

Digital media have become an integral part of lifestyles in recent years, and the ubiquity of digital devices coupled with poor screen use habits can have a detrimental effect on the developmental and psychosocial well-being of children. A new study by KK Women's and Children's Hospital (KKH), together with National University of Singapore, has found that first exposure earlier than 18 months of age to screen devices -- such as smartphones, tablets, videogame consoles, television etc -- and the presence of multiple screen devices in the bedroom are associated with elevated sleep disruption and emotional and behavioral difficulties (EBD) in preschool children with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs). Read More


Major Changes in IEP Diagnosis and Classification for Children with Disabilities Proposed by NASET

The National Association of Special Education Teachers (NASET) is proposing major changes to the existing system in which children with disabilities are diagnosed and classified on EPs (Individual Educational Programs). This new system will provide all professionals working in the field of special education, college students preparing to work with children with special needs, administrators, college professors, parents, and students with disabilities the information necessary to adequately determine the most comprehensive, detailed, and precise diagnoses of disabilities or disorders seen in infants, toddlers, children, and adolescents, particularly in the educational environment. Read More


TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Congratulations to: Kelly Jewell-Glasscock, Melody Owens, Alana Kerr, Olumide Akerele, Cindi Maurice, Patsy Ray, and Jenifer Womble-Ericson, who all knew the answer to this week's trivia question:

According to new research presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) 2019 National Conference & Exhibition in New Orleans, only what percentage of school age children in the United States get 9 or more hours of sleep most weeknights? 

Answer: 48% 

This Week's Trivia Question:  Absence, atonic, clonic, tonic, focal, and myoclonic are all names of what types of what disorders? 

If you know the answer to this week's trivia questions, email it to us at contactus@naset.org by November 25, 2019. If you are correct, you will be acknowledged in next week's NASET's Week in Review 



Family Pushes for Autism Symbol to be Added to New York Driver's Licenses

For Pete and Denise Gagliardo of Putnam Lake, the epiphany for placing the autism symbol on the New York State Driver's License came during the season opening episode of ABC's hit show "The Good Doctor." "It popped into my mind about kids that are on the spectrum. What happens to my son now that he is driving if he gets pulled over in this instance," Pete said. "What is he going to do if something happens out of the norm." So Pete, thinking of his 18-year-old autistic son Ryan, put his idea on paper. He sent a letter to 20 New York legislators, including Governor Andrew Cuomo who responded and said he would look into the proposal. Yonkers State Assemblyman Nader Sayegh went even further. Read More


Family Pushes for Autism Symbol to be Added to New York Driver's Licenses

For Pete and Denise Gagliardo of Putnam Lake, the epiphany for placing the autism symbol on the New York State Driver's License came during the season opening episode of ABC's hit show "The Good Doctor." "It popped into my mind about kids that are on the spectrum. What happens to my son now that he is driving if he gets pulled over in this instance," Pete said. "What is he going to do if something happens out of the norm." So Pete, thinking of his 18-year-old autistic son Ryan, put his idea on paper. He sent a letter to 20 New York legislators, including Governor Andrew Cuomo who responded and said he would look into the proposal. Yonkers State Assemblyman Nader Sayegh went even further. Read More

 



Special Needs Students, Costs Increase While Nevada County Schools Try to Make Do

Nevada Union's Step program is situated in a long, enclosed hallway. Classrooms line each side, and include training for functional life skills. The 18- to 22-year-old students in these classes fall under the "moderate to severe" special needs category. These spaces are meant to be made easier for students - the fluorescent lights hanging overhead, for example, are covered to reduce tension on the eyes. "Back in the day, we use to not be responsible for students once they got a certificate of completion," said Sean Manchester, former director of special education and pupil services at the Nevada Joint Union High School District, earlier this year. "Now we're responsible for students until they are 22." Half of Nevada Union High School's "D Wing" is dedicated to "mild to moderate" special needs students. Generally, the school's nurses spend 70% to 80% of their time with Individualized Education Program (IEP) students, or those with special needs, said Manchester. Read More


In States Where Recreational Marijuana is Legal, Problematic Use Increased Among Adults and Teens

Problematic use of marijuana among adolescents and adults increased after legalization of recreational marijuana use, according to a new study from NYU Grossman School of Medicine and Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. Published online November 13 in JAMA Psychiatry, the study is the first to look at the impact of recreational marijuana legalization on both use and cannabis use disorder (commonly referred to as problematic marijuana use) across multiple age groups. Presently, 11 states and Washington, D.C. have legalized marijuana for recreational use while 33 states and D.C. have legalized marijuana for medical use. Read More


Companies Need to Do More for Employees and Customers with Disabilities

In 1990, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) opened a new world for millions of people with disabilities by requiring businesses to make their physical locations accessible. Forward thinking business leaders are making sure their digital spaces are also accessible and are embracing the universal design that will help them tap into new consumer markets. But too many businesses-including pizza chain Dominos-have made their websites (often unintentionally) inaccessible. Earlier this month, the Supreme Court signaled that all companies must so better, that physical accessibility and digital accessibility are two sides of the same coin. While some see this development as a costly burden to be resisted, we see an opportunity to embrace innovation and new talent. In 2017, we led a study, "Disabilities and Inclusion", at the Center for Talent Innovation, which uncovered enormous innovative potential in hiring and empowering employees who themselves have disabilities because they excel in designing products for consumers with disabilities. Read More


More than Four-Legged Friends: How Animals are Helping People with Disabilities

Animals help out humans every single day. But for some people who have physical disabilities, they have an extra impact. Paula Bollen is a Southern Tier native. She graduated from Union-Endicott High School and went on to graduate from Binghamton University. Then... her world changed. "The doctor came in, and with nobody around, told me," said Bollen. Paula was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. "It's a devastating disease. One of many," she said. "It can take all your friends away because they're at work and after work they're tired. So who's going to come over and visit? And I got lucky to have a best friend in Susanna." But then Paula was lucky enough to find another best friend. Read More


More than Four-Legged Friends: How Animals are Helping People with Disabilities

Animals help out humans every single day. But for some people who have physical disabilities, they have an extra impact. Paula Bollen is a Southern Tier native. She graduated from Union-Endicott High School and went on to graduate from Binghamton University. Then... her world changed. "The doctor came in, and with nobody around, told me," said Bollen. Paula was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. "It's a devastating disease. One of many," she said. "It can take all your friends away because they're at work and after work they're tired. So who's going to come over and visit? And I got lucky to have a best friend in Susanna." But then Paula was lucky enough to find another best friend. Read More



Study Reveals 'Bug Wars' that Take Place in Cystic Fibrosis

Scientists have revealed how common respiratory bugs that cause serious infections in people with cystic fibrosis interact together, according to a new study in eLife. The results provide insights into how bacterial pathogens wrestle each other for territory that could open avenues for new antibacterial treatments. Studies of microbes from mouths, intestines, chronic wounds and chronic respiratory infections show that interactions between bacteria in these communities influence survival of the bugs and progression of disease. For example, infection with two bacterial species called Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) in the airways of cystic fibrosis patients is linked to decreased lung function and a shorter lifespan. Read More


Is Virtual Reality the Next Big Thing in Art Therapy?

The ever-expanding field of virtual reality (VR) has been used in health care settings like physical rehabilitation. It's also made its way into therapy settings to reduce phobias and delusions. Could creative arts therapies be the next frontier for VR? Researchers from Drexel University's College of Nursing and Health Professions in the Creative Arts Therapies Department conducted a study to see if VR can be used as an expressive tool in art therapy. "Art therapy is founded on the idea that creative expression with an art therapist facilitates communication and problem solving, reduces inhibition, alleviates depressive symptoms and promotes personal development," said lead author of the study Girija Kaimal, EdD, an associate professor in the College of Nursing and Health Professions. Read More


Preterm Children have Similar Temperament to Children who were Institutionally Deprived

A child's temperament is affected by the early stages of their life, research suggests. Researchers from the University of Warwick, the University of Tennessee, University of Southampton and Kings College London have found children who were born very preterm (under 32 weeks gestation) or very low birthweight (under 1500g) had similar temperamental difficulties in controlling their impulses, to children who experienced institutional deprivation. The paper 'A Comparison of the Effects of Preterm Birth and Institutional Deprivation on Child Temperament', published today, 12 November in the journal Development and Psychopathology, highlights how different adverse experiences such as preterm birth and institutional deprivation affect children's temperament in similar ways, resulting in greater risk for lower self-control. Read More


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Pay More Attention to Climate Perils People with Disabilities Face, Experts Warn

People with physical disabilities are among the most vulnerable to climate change, yet scant attention has been paid to their unique challenges, according to a letter published in the journal Science. "The international research community has made good progress at including vulnerable groups such as poor communities, women, indigenous people, and youth in recent international conversations about global environmental change, but disabled populations have been mostly absent from the conversation," researchers wrote. Among other things, disabled people may have "limited access to knowledge, resources and services to effectively respond to environmental change," wrote Aleksandra Kosanic and co-authors. Read More



Associations between Childhood Maltreatment and Offending Behaviors Later in Life

Children who experience maltreatment, such as neglect or physical or sexual abuse, are more likely to engage in delinquent and offending behaviors in adolescence and young adulthood, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Public Health. Corresponding author Hannah Lantos, a youth development expert at Child Trends, a non-profit research organization in Bethesda, Maryland, USA said: "Maltreatment and experiences of violence have been shown to impact children's wellbeing long into the future, and there is a risk of a link between experiences of maltreatment and engagement in delinquent behaviors in childhood and adolescence. Our research suggests that many young people involved in the juvenile justice system are struggling with the effects of trauma and earlier maltreatment, and that we should provide support for youth who have experienced maltreatment to engage in more pro-social behaviors." Read More


Allergy Shots May be an Effective Treatment for Pediatric Pollen Food Allergy Syndrome

We know that children with pollen food allergy syndrome (PFAS) also suffer from seasonal allergies. A new study being presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting in Houston shows that allergy shots (subcutaneous immunotherapy) can be effective in reducing PFAS symptoms for pediatric patients. Pollen food allergy syndrome (also known as oral allergy syndrome) is caused by cross-reacting allergens found in both pollen and raw fruits, vegetables or some tree nuts. Symptoms usually include itchy mouth, scratchy throat or swelling of the lips, mouth, tongue and throat. "We surveyed 20 pediatric patients between the ages of 9 and 18 receiving allergy shots as treatment for mugwort, timothy and orchard grass allergies," says allergist Alana Jones, DO, ACAAI member and co-author of the study. "All 20 patients reported PFAS symptoms. Of the 20 surveyed, 11 (55 percent) described improvement or resolution of their symptoms. Four (20 percent) reported unchanged symptoms and five (25 percent) reported they hadn't tried to reintroduce foods they'd previously reacted to." Read More


Insights on the Effects of Cannabidiol on Severe Form of Epilepsy

Results from a study published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology may help explain why cannabidiol -- a chemical component of marijuana with no psychoactive properties -- reduces the frequency of seizures in patients with a severe form of epilepsy. The effect may be explained by a drug-drug interaction between cannabidiol and the anti-seizure medication clobazam. The form of epilepsy examined in the study is called Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Investigators conducted clinical trial simulations for the effect of 20 mg/kg/day cannabidiol on seizure frequency in patients with this syndrome. Read More



LATEST JOB LISTINGS POSTED ON NASET

* Resource Specialist - The Resource Specialist is a certificated, exempt position with Element Education, Inc. (EEI) which operates Dimensions Collaborative and Community Montessori Charter Schools. The Resource Specialist directly reports to the Director of Special Education. The Resource Specialist will work directly with the Director of Special Education to implement the EEI's Special Education programs and provide support and guidance to Educational Facilitators and parents of students with special needs. To learn more - Click here

* Teacher for Children with Autism - NECC serves students between the ages of 3 and 22 diagnosed with autism, learning disabilities, language delays, intellectual disability, behavior disorders, and related disabilities. The Center provides a full range of educational, residential and treatment programs designed to help children reach their full potential. The goal of maximizing independence serves as the foundation of all Center programs. To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Surprise, AZ - The Invo-Progressus Team has incredible opportunities for Special Education Teachers.  We are currently seeking full-time Special Education Teachers for a Structured Teaching 4-8 Classroom, a Preschool Classroom, and a SPED Resource Teacher for a K-8 classroom in Surprise, AZ. To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Philadelphia, PA -Invo-Progressus Team has incredible opportunities for Special Education Teachers...or, as we like to call them, Superheroes.  If you use your super powers to help ensure that children have access to the best education possible in the least restrictive environment, we would love for you to join the Invo-Progressus team!  We are currently seeking full-time Special Education Teachers in Philadelphia, PA for the 2019-2020 School Year. To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Teacher - School Steps, an Invo Company, is hiring a Special Education Teacher in San Diego, CA.The qualified Special Education Teacher will teach elementary and/or secondary school subjects including social and prevocational skills to special education students with a variety of neurological, learning, and social/emotional disabilities. To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Teacher - The Pinnacle School, a private, special education day school for college-bound students in grades 2 through 12, seeks a Lower and Middle School Special Education Teacher for a full-time, school-based position (10 months). The Special Education Teacher will provide high quality, data-driven instruction to students aligned with the school's mission and philosophy. To learn more - Click here

* Special Education Teacher - Eastern Illinois Area of Special Education (Charleston, IL). Spec. Ed. Teacher. Develop materials for indiv. programs, goals/objectives for students, and evaluate acad/therapeutic/social growth for Spec. Ed students (K - age 21). Keep records and progress reports. Give standardized tests, other evaluative materials, maintain IEPs. To learn more - Click here

* Teacher - Under general supervision, plans and implements academic lessons, activities and plans for students in an assigned program.  Assesses student's academic abilities and educational needs; develops goals and objectives for the academic portion of the student's IEPs.  Develops, plans and implements lesson plans that meet identified goals and which incorporate student behavioral characteristics and communication abilities. To learn more - Click here

If you are an Employer looking for excellent special education staff - Click here for more information


Food For Thought..........

You can't use up creativity. The more you use the more you have.  

         Maya Angelou


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