Week in Review - March 27, 2015

WEEK IN REVIEW

New NASET Publications and Articles of Interest in Special Education and Disabilities That Were Reported This Week

March 27, 2015 - Vol 11, Issue 13


 

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In This Issue

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK


Dear NASET News,

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW Here, we provide you with the latest publications from NASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about theWEEK in REVIEW at news@naset.org. Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,


NASET News Team

OMEGA GAMMA CHI

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Honor Society for Special Education Teachers

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New This Week on NASET

See NASET's Latest Job Listings

IVF Kids May Have Higher Odds of Autism, Study Finds

Children conceived through assisted reproductive technology, such as in vitro fertilization, are twice as likely to have autism as those conceived without assistance, a new study finds. But researchers only found an association, which may be explained by multiple births and other risks, not the infertility treatment itself, experts said. The study included nearly 6 million children born from 1997 to 2007. After taking into account factors such as mother's education and multiple births, the increased risk was seen only for mothers under 35, the researchers said. To read more, click here

How Cannabis Use Affects People with Bipolar Disorder

The first study to examine the use of cannabis in the context of daily life among people with Bipolar Disorder has shown how the drug is linked to increases in both manic and depressive symptoms. Around 2% of the UK population has Bipolar Disorder, with up to 60% using cannabis at some point in their lives, but research in this area is limited and reasons for high levels of use are unclear. Dr Elizabeth Tyler of the Spectrum Centre for Mental Health Research at Lancaster University led the study published in PLOS ONE with Professor Steven Jones and colleagues from the University of Manchester, Professor Christine Barrowclough, Nancy Black and Lesley-Anne Carter. To read more, click here

Can Fish Oil Help Boys With ADHD Pay Attention?

Boys with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder may benefit from the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish and some vegetable oils, a small European study suggests. Those who regularly ate an omega-3-loaded margarine experienced an improvement in their ability to pay attention, compared with boys who did not, researchers report in the March 19 issue of Neuropsychopharmacology. The results suggest that parents might help children with ADHD by adding foods rich in omega-3s to their diet, or by giving them a fish oil supplement, said lead author Dienke Bos, a postdoctoral researcher with the Brain Center Rudolf Magnus at the University Medical Center Utrecht in the Netherlands. To read more, click here

AASEP Logo

NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

Birth Weight and Pregnancy Complications Associated with Enamel Defects

A cross-sectional representative study aimed to assess the association between birth weight and severity of defects development of enamel (DDE) in the primary dentition. The sample was comprised 1,309 children five years of age, enrolled in kindergarten in the city of Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. The children were examined at school for the diagnosis of DDE. The mothers answered a questionnaire containing information of complications during pregnancy. The response variable was dichotomized in greater and lesser gravity of developmental defects of enamel, depending on the location of the DDE, when in the previous sector was considered minor and when he was in the posterior region or both, greater severity. The covariates were child gender, birth weight, prematurity, age of the mother during pregnancy and complications during pregnancy. To read more, click here

NASET Members Only

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Guess the answer to this week's trivia question and we'll recognize you in next week's Week in Review.
Congratulations to: Laurine Kennedy, Shameem Banu, Karen Bornholm, Ope-Oluwa Olubela, Olumide Akerele, Marilyn Haile and Ellen Tannebaum who all knew the answer to last week's trivia question: Based on the latest research in the field, approximately what percent of children worldwide have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder?
ANSWER:  Approximately Seven Percent (7%)
THIS WEEK'S TRIVIA QUESTION:
According to the latest research in the field, overindulgent parents have a greater chance of raising children who think too highly of themselves and likely develop what personality trait because of putting them on a pedestal and dole out unearned praise?
If you know the answer, send an email to contactus@naset.org
All answers must be submitted no later than Monday, March 30, 2014 at 12:00 p.m.

Why Isn't There Any Cheap, Generic Insulin?

New research examines why people with diabetes who depend on injections of lifesaving insulin still have no cheaper generic options to treat their disease. "Surprisingly, this issue has not been talked about, so we're asking the question: Why is there no generic insulin?" said senior study author Dr. Kevin Riggs, a research fellow at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. In their report, published March 19 in the New England Journal of Medicine, Riggs and his colleague Dr. Jeremy Greene describe how the unique development of insulin allowed pharmaceutical companies to continually improve the medication while extending patents for decades. Generic drugs cannot be made until a patent on a brand-name drug expires. To read more, click here

New Quality Measures Approved for Childhood Sleep Apnea

work group of physicians from leading academic medical centers across the country, including NYU Langone Medical Center, has developed new quality measures for the detection and treatment of childhood obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a potentially morbid, life-altering condition that affects hundreds of thousands of children and adolescents nationwide. The measures, commissioned and endorsed by the American Association of Sleep Medicine (AASM), are published on March 15 in a special section of The Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. To read more, click here

Recess: An Essential Part of the School Day

Recess is an essential part of children's school days that can help set students up for success once they head back to the classroom, a new study suggests. Yet, many schools are cutting back on recess or not offering quality recess time. This may have unintended negative consequences, the Stanford University researchers cautioned. "Recess isn't normally considered part of school climate, and often is shortchanged in tight fiscal times, but our research shows that [recess] can be a critical contributor to positive school climate in low-income elementary schools," study co-author Milbrey McLaughlin, the founding director of Stanford's John W. Gardner Center, said in a university news release. To read more, click here

Some Things Hugs Can't Fix: Parental Warmth Does Not Remove Anxiety that Follows Punishment

A loving mom can't overcome the anxiety and aggression caused by corporal punishment, and her otherwise warm demeanor may make it worse, according to research led by Duke University that was recently published in the Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology. "If you believe that you can shake your children or slap them across the face and then smooth things over gradually by smothering them with love, you are mistaken," wrote lead researcher Jennifer E. Lansford on the Child and Family Blog. Lansford is a research professor at the Social Science Research Institute at Duke University. "Being very warm with a child whom you hit in this manner rarely makes things better. It can make a child more, not less, anxious." To read more, click here

Slowed Growth Could Signal Crohn's Disease in Kids

A lag in growth could be a sign that a child might suffer from undiagnosed inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), especially Crohn's disease, one pediatric doctor says. "Growth charts are one of the most important things we look at with children because sometimes a slower growth rate is the only sign of IBD, especially with Crohn's disease," Dr. Marc Schaefer, a pediatric gastroenterologist, said in a Penn State University news release. Other symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease in children include not wanting to eat, persistent stomach pains, and diarrhea or bloody stools, said Schaefer, who works at Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital in Hershey, Pa. To read more, click here


NASET - Members Only Savings

NASET is pleased to provide our members with exclusive access to discounts on products and services. These savings are available to all current NASET members. To find out more about savings from Life Lock, Avis, Budget, Cruises Only, Orlando Vacations and more - Click here

Flawed IQ Scoring System: Important Difference in American, Canadian Scoring Systems

Scientists have uncovered anomalies and issues with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition, one of the most widely used intelligence tests in the world. IQ scores are used to predict educational success, to help identify intellectual disabilities or intellectual giftedness and to establish whether a person has a specific learning disability. To read more, click here


Diabetes Groups Call for Greater Scrutiny of Insulin Pumps

The American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes are calling for more research into the safety and effectiveness of insulin pumps. The diabetes' groups recommended "the adoption of a more rigorous, standardized and transparent approach to safety." Among other things, they want European and American officials to bring their insulin pump standards into harmony. They also called for a single, worldwide database devoted to information about harmful events involving insulin pumps. They also recommended the database include the number of patients using the products, and the results of studies into new features. To read more, click here


Robot Model for Infant Learning Shows Bodily Posture May Affect Memory and Learning

Using both robots and infants, a cognitive scientist and collaborators have found that posture is critical in the early stages of acquiring new knowledge. "This study shows that the body plays a role in early object name learning, and how toddlers use the body's position in space to connect ideas," an author said. "The creation of a robot model for infant learning has far-reaching implications for how the brains of young people work." To read more, click here


Low Vaccination Rates Likely Behind Disney Measles Outbreak: Study

Pockets of unvaccinated children appear to have fueled the recent measles outbreak traced to Disney theme parks in California, researchers report. "The Disneyland outbreak is quite possibly a direct consequence of the growing anti-vaccination movement in the United States," said study author Maimuna Majumder, a research fellow at Boston Children's Hospital. Although the person who started the outbreak has not been identified, the researchers analyzed outbreak data and found the rapid spread of the disease indicates that most of those infected were not vaccinated or were incompletely vaccinated. To read more, click here


Schools Using Out-of-School Suspension Drug Policy Show Increased Likelihood of Marijuana Use

Schools where administrators report using out-of-school suspension to enforce drug policy and where students report low policy enforcement, regardless of the type of drug policy adopted, show an increased likelihood of marijuana use, according to new research. Schools that used abstinence-based prevention and those that counseled students about the dangers of marijuana use showed a lower likelihood of marijuana use. To read more, click here


Spring Allergies Coming Into Bloom

With winter loosening its icy grip on most of the United States, it's time to think about spring allergies, a doctor says. Allergies to spring pollens cause sneezing, stuffy and runny nose, and watery eyes. Other symptoms include itchy nose, mouth, throat, eyes and ears, said Dr. Luz Fonacier, head of allergy and training at Winthrop University Hospital in Mineola, N.Y. At least three-quarters of asthma patients have allergies, "and these allergic responses in the lung can lead to coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath," Fonacier added. To read more, click here


Impact of Parents' Military Deployment on Children's Safety and Mental Health

A recent study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry reports that following military parents' return from combat deployment, their children show increased visits for mental healthcare, physical injury, and child maltreatment consults, compared to children whose parents have not been deployed. The same types of healthcare visits were also found to be significantly higher for children of combat-injured parents. Children of deployed parents are known to have increased mental healthcare needs, and be at increased risk for child maltreatment during period of parental deployment. The ongoing impact of parental deployments following a parents' return, and the impact of parental wartime injuries on children had not previously been studied. To read more, click here

AASEP Logo

NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

Symptoms of Migraines in Children

Determining if your child has migraine headaches may be difficult because the symptoms aren't always obvious, experts say. A child who complains about severe headaches should be seen by a doctor, but there are other symptoms that parents may not associate with migraine, according to the American Migraine Foundation. They may include nausea and vomiting, abdominal pain, and sensitivity to light, sounds and odors. Another clue: wanting to lie down in a dark room, says the foundation. "While migraine can be extremely debilitating, it is also often treatable. The key thing is to get your child to a headache specialist if he or she exhibits potential migraine symptoms," said Dr. David Dodick in a foundation news release. He is professor of neurology at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Scottsdale, Ariz., and the foundation's chair. To read more, click here


5 Ways You are Failing Students With Learning Disabilities (and What to Do About It)

I worked as a learning specialist at a day school for a decade, teaching students with learning disabilities how to successfully navigate the rigorous academic landscape. Be sure to take special note of the past tense in that sentence. After 10 years, I was done. No more conforming to niceties. No more saying one thing and then having to do another. It was time to speak my truth, in service to parents and students. I've since partnered with my sister (a former teacher herself--we once had adjoining classrooms) to launch a business that creates academic transformation by helping students, and their parents, get honest, real, and take consistent action. To read more, click here


jobsNASET's Latest Job Listings

* Special Education Teacher: $125K Salary - Earn a $125,000 salary and join a team of master teachers at The Equity Project (TEP) Charter School, recently featured on the front page of the New York Times. To learn more -Click here


* Director of Student Supports - RePublic is searching for passionate, bold, and gritty Directors of Student Supports (Special Education) ready to lock arms with the teasm at Liberty Collegiate, Nashville Prep and RePublic High for the 2015-16 school year. To learn more - Click here


* Teacher - We are looking for highly motivated and skilled talent to join our team at the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS). We seek individuals who are passionate about transforming and improving educational outcomes for our students. To learn more - Click here


* Learning Specialist - The New School of San Francisco is a K-12 public charter school, demonstrating a "hands-on, minds-on" approach to learning that harnesses each student's curiosity and encourages learners to construct their own meaning and knowledge through hands-on experiences. To learn more - Click here


* School Director - New School for Autistic Students seeks a School Director to establish in consultation with others the vision, mission and mandate for the school- To learn more - Click here


* Assistant Professor of Education- UC Clermont invites applications for tenure-track faculty position beginning August 15, 2015 unless otherwise indicated. UC Clermont is an open admissions regional campus thirty miles east of the University of Cincinnati in Batavia, Ohio with an enrollment of approximately 3,500 students. To learn more - Click here


* Special Education Teacher-Cross Categorical - Genesee Lake School is an accredited, nationally recognized leader providing therapeutic educational services to children and adolescents diagnosed with developmental disabilities and emotional/behavioral disorders. To learn more -Click here

 


Food For Thought..........

If we don't stand up for children, then we don't stand for much.

Marian Wright Edelman