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PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT COURSES

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Course Tests and Certificates are accessible only through the online course (upon successful course exam completion).

Please Note: Each of the following National Association of Special Education Teachers' (NASET) professional development courses entitle you to CE Study Hour. Each NASET CE Study Hour is based on the requirements of each course which are rated in hour(s) for reading, comprehension and the completion of an t exam at the end of the course. Please be aware that NASET CE Study Hours are not a guarantee of acceptance of evidence of professional development by school districts, since every state and/or school district may have it's own standards or requirements.  To verify whether a NASET CE Study Hour is accepted by your school district or state, please contact your local or state education department.

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NASET PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT COURSE LIST (68 Courses)


ADAPTING CURRICULUM FOR STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

Adapting Curriculum for Students with Special Needs -One of the most important things to keep in mind when working with students with special needs is that they can learn. In many cases, it is not the lack of understanding or knowledge that causes problems but rather the manner of presentation, response requirements, and level of presentation. Adapting curriculum for students with special needs is an essential part of being a special educator. The focus of this NASET Professional Development course will be on various strategies surrounding adaptation of curriculum for students with special needs. After taking this course you will understand the following:

  • Curriculum Adaptations
  • Ways to Adapt Instruction
  • Checklist of Suggestions for Adapting the Curriculum
  • Strategies for Adapting Tests and Quizzes
  • Adapting Response Mode
  • Working with the Child with a Learning Disability in the Classroom
  • Working with the Child with an Emotional Disturbance in the Classroom
  • Working with the Child with Intellectual Disabilities in the Classroom
  • Adapting Grading Systems
  • Reporting to Parents

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ALLERGIES: TEACHERS' ROLES and RESPONSIBILITIES

Allergies: Teachers' Roles and Responsibilities - Teachers have a responsibility to be aware of important information on all their students that may impact their learning or safety. Specifically, many children may have allergies, many of which are life-threatening in nature. When you have a student with a life-threatening allergy in your class, there are issues that you need to understand in order to ensure the safety of that child. Not knowing your responsibilities places the child in jeopardy as well as potential professional and legal implications. Collaboration among parent(s)/guardian(s) and all school departments; including school nursing personnel, teachers, administration, guidance, food service, transportation services, custodial staff, and after school personnel, is essential for a successful school experience for students with life?threatening allergies and other serious health issues. The focus of this NASET Professional Development course will be on understanding life threatening allergies and the roles and responsibilities often seen by teachers when working with children diagnosed with them.


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ALTERNATE TESTING MODIFICATIONS

Alternate Testing Modifications - As an educator you will frequently be asked about the need for a student to have some type of modifications on their IEP. Alternate testing techniques are modifications that take into account the individual needs of a child having a disability and as a result modify testing or classroom procedures or formats. These modifications attempt to provide these students with equal opportunity to participate in testing or classroom situations. These techniques must appear on the student's IEP and provide the opportunity to demonstrate a child with a disability’s mastery of skills without being unfairly restricted by the presence of that disability. Children classified by the IEP Committee are entitled to alternate testing and classroom modifications as long as there is substantiated evidence for such a need in the testing or background of the child. There are no limits as to the number of modifications, but only include them in the IEP if they will enable the child to be more successful in school. This course will provide an overview test alternative techniques and modifications.


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ANNUAL & TRIENNIAL REVIEWS- WHAT SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHERS NEED TO KNOW

Annual & Triennial Reviews - What Special Education Teachers Need to Know - A very important role for the special education teacher is demonstrated in the annual review and triennial review process. These reviews are a legal responsibility of the district and must be provided to all classified students who reside within the school district. The Annual Review involves a yearly evaluation by the district’s IEP Committee of the student's classification and educational program. Included in these two general areas are a review of related services provided, the need to add or remove test accommodations or modifications, parents concern or requests, academic progress, transportation needs, goals and objectives and the development of a new IEP for the upcoming school year. The Triennial Review Process involves the complete reevaluation of a child classified with a disability every 3 years in order to determine whether or not the conditions upon which the original classification was determined are still evident. This course will prepare you with all the knowledge of what materials and information you will need to make a professional presentation at each of these meetings.


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ANXIETY DISORDERS: A BASIC OVERVIEW

Anxiety Disorders - Anxiety Disorders affect about 40 million American adults age 18 years and older (about 18%) in a given year, causing them to be filled with fearfulness and uncertainty. Unlike the relatively mild, brief anxiety caused by a stressful event (such as speaking in public or a first date), anxiety disorders last at least 6 months and can get worse if they are not treated. Anxiety disorders commonly occur along with other mental or physical illnesses, including alcohol or substance abuse, which may mask anxiety symptoms or make them worse. In some cases, these other illnesses need to be treated before a person will respond to treatment for the anxiety disorder. This course will cover many of the different Anxiety Disorders.


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ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY: AN OVERVIEW

Assistive Technology:  An Overview - As educators, you will need to be responsible for understanding and being aware of the numerous assistive technology (AT) options offered to children with special needs. With the increase of technology in today’s society, nowhere is the use more evident than in the classroom situation. This course will provide an overview of the different assistive technolgies and how they are used for specific disabilities.


 

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ATTENTION DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER (ADHD)

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a condition that becomes apparent in some children in the preschool and early school years. It is hard for these children to control their behavior and/or pay attention. It is estimated that between 3 and 5 percent of children have ADHD, or approximately 2 million children in the United States. This means that in a classroom of 25 to 30 children, it is likely that at least one will have ADHD. 
 
A child with ADHD faces a difficult but not insurmountable task ahead. In order to achieve his or her full potential, he or she should receive help, guidance, and understanding from parents, guidance counselors, and the public education system.
 
This course offers information on ADHD and its management, including research on medications and behavioral interventions, as well as helpful resources on educational options.


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AUDITORY PROCESSING DISORDER - STAFF DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

Auditory Processing Disorder - Staff Development Brief - Auditory processing is a term used to describe what happens when your brain recognizes and interprets the sounds around you. Humans hear when energy that we recognize as sound travels through the ear and is changed into electrical information that can be interpreted by the brain. The "disorder" part of auditory processing disorder means that something is adversely affecting the processing or interpretation of the information. This Staff Development Brief will provide you with a good overview of auditory processing disorder.


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AUTISM

Autism - Autism and Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) are developmental disabilities that share many of the same characteristics. Usually evident by age three, autism and PDD are neurological disorders that affect a child’s ability to communicate, understand language, play, and relate to others.  Early diagnosis and appropriate educational programs are very important to children with autism or PDD.  This course will provide the reader with a basic overview of autism and PDD and important educational considerations to consider.


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AUTISM: CRITERIA FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION

Autism: Criteria for Determining Eligibility for Special Education - This course will provide you with the criteria and process used in the determination of special education eligibility for children with the suspected disability of autism.  It is designed in a step-by-step format for the reader to gain a greater understanding of how diagnoses are made, and the specific requirements for eligibility.


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BEHAVIOR PROBLEMS: INTERVENTION STRATEGIES

Behavior Problems:  Intervention Strategies - We hear more and more today about the chronic behavior problems of students in our schools. Some of these students have disabilities, some do not. Each needs and deserves help in learning how to behave both in school and outside of school. This course is meant to help schools answer the question, "What does the research tell us?" about promising interventions for students with a history of behavior problems. It's important to know that there is a tremendous body of research available on this subject, covering a wide variety of students, situations, and settings. It is a short overview that you can use and adapt to help your students and develop your own programs. It is helpful to read the original research (such as the articles mentioned here) to learn the details of what works and why.


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BIPOLAR DISORDER

Bipolar Disorder - Bipolar disorder, also known as manic-depressive illness, is a brain disorder that causes unusual shifts in a person's mood, energy, and ability to function. Different from the normal ups and downs that everyone goes through, the symptoms of bipolar disorder are severe. They can result in damaged relationships, poor job or school performance, and even suicide. But there is good news: bipolar disorder can be treated, and people with this illness can lead full and productive lives. This course will provide an excellent overview of this crucial topic.


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COGNITIVE DISABILITIES: HELPING STUDENTS FIND AND KEEP A JOB

Cognitive Disabilities:  Helping Students Find and Keep a Job - This course is written for those involved in helping students with cognitive disabilities such as intellectual disability or autism find and keep a job. This includes parents, family members, teachers, transition specialists, job development specialists, employers, and others. It focuses on the processes involved in finding and keeping employment.


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DEAF-BLINDNESS: CRITERIA FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION

Deaf-Blindness: Criteria for Determining Eligibility for Special Education - This course will provide you with the criteria and process used in the determination of special education eligibility for children with the suspected disability of deaf-blindness.  It is designed in a step-by-step format for the reader to gain a greater understanding of how diagnoses are made, and the specific requirements for eligibility.


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DEAFNESS AND HEARING LOSS

Deafness and Hearing Loss - Hearing loss and deafness affect individuals of all ages and may occur at any time from infancy through old age. Hearing impairment and deafness affect approximately 28 million Americans. Of these 28 million, approximately 11 million have significant irreversible hearing loss, and one million are deaf. Only 5% of people with hearing loss are under the age of 17 (Deaf World Web, 2000).  The U.S. Department of Education (2004) reports that, during the 2003–2004 school year, 71,118 students aged 6 to 21 (or 1.2 % of all students with disabilities) received special education services under the category of “hearing impairment.” However, the number of children with hearing loss and deafness is undoubtedly higher, since many of these students may have other disabilities as well and may be served under other categories.  This course is designed to present a basic overview of deafness and hearing loss.


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DEPRESSION

Depression - A depressive disorder is an illness that involves the body, mood, and thoughts. It affects the way a person eats and sleeps, the way one feels about oneself, and the way one thinks about things. A depressive disorder is not the same as a passing blue mood. It is not a sign of personal weakness or a condition that can be willed or wished away. People with a depressive illness cannot merely "pull themselves together" and get better. Without treatment, symptoms can last for weeks, months, or years. Appropriate treatment, however, can help most people who suffer from depression. This course will provide you with an excellent overview of this topic.

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DEVELOPMENTAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL DISORDERS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION

Developmental and Psychological Disorders in Special Education - In the course of their experience, special educators will encounter a wide variety of developmental and psychological disorders. Many may be caused by intellectual, social, emotional, academic, environmental or medical factors. It is important that you have a basic understanding of the more common ones that may be presented by certain students.  Your knowledge of these conditions can assist parents, doctors, other students in the class as well as the student him/herself.  Understanding the nature of certain disorders can enhance your total understanding of the child and the factors that play a role in the child's educational development. This course will provide a general overview of this topic.

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DEVELOPMENTAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL DISORDERS: EDUCATIONAL IMPLICATIONS FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION STUDENTS

Developmental and Psychological Disorders: Educational Implications for Special Education Students - As special educators you will be working with a wide variety of students with developmental and psychological disorders. One of the main concerns from teachers in special education involves the educational implications for children with these disorders. This course was developed to discuss and provide information on educational implications and what can be done for students with psychological and developmental disorders. 


DEVELOPMENTAL DELAY: CRITERIA FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION

This course will provide you with the criteria and process used in the determination of special education eligibility for children with a developmental delay.  It is designed in a step-by-step format for the reader to gain a greater understanding of how diagnoses are made, and the specific requirements for eligibility.


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DISABILTIES IN SPECIAL EDUCATION: AN OVERVIEW OF STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES IN SPECIAL EDUCATION

Disabilities in Special Education:  An Overview of Students in Special Education -When working with children with special needs it is extremely important that you have a foundation of knowledge about these students and the field of special education. Our experience has shown us that having a foundation of knowledge in this area will make it more comfortable and reassuring as you work with this population. The purpose of  Overview of Students with Disabilities in Special Education course is to provide you with a working knowledge of the varying student disabilities in special education.


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DOWN SYNDROME-STAFF DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

Down Syndrome-Staff Development Brief - Down syndrome is the most common and readily identifiable chromosomal condition associated with intellectual disability. It is caused by a chromosomal abnormality: for some unexplained reason, an accident in cell development results in 47 instead of the usual 46 chromosomes. This course will present a basic overview of Down Syndrome.


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EATING DISORDERS

Eating Disorders - Eating is controlled by many factors, including appetite, food availability, family, peer, and cultural practices, and attempts at voluntary control. Dieting to a body weight leaner than needed for health is highly promoted by current fashion trends, sales campaigns for special foods, and in some activities and professions. Eating disorders involve serious disturbances in eating behavior, such as extreme and unhealthy reduction of food intake or severe overeating, as well as feelings of distress or extreme concern about body shape or weight. This course will provide the educator with an excellent overview of this very important topic.


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EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE

Emotional Distrurbance - Many terms are used to describe emotional, behavioral or mental disorders. Currently, students with such disorders are categorized as having an emotional disturbance. This course will present a basic overview of students with emotional disturbance.


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EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE: CRITERIA FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION

Emotional Disturbance: Criteria for Determining Eligibility for Special Education  - This course will provide you with the criteria and process used in the determination of special education eligibility for children with the suspected disability of emotional disturbance.  It is designed in a step-by-step format for the reader to gain a greater understanding of how diagnoses are made, and the specific requirements for eligibility.


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EMPLOYMENT OPTIONS FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: A GUIDE FOR HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATORS

Employment Options for Students with Disabilities: A Guide for High School Educators - NASET offers a Professional Development Course on vocational assessment titled, Vocational Assessment and Training: A Guide for High School Educators. If you have not yet taken that course, it might be in your best interest to do so before taking this one, as it will lay the foundation for the principles to be discussed.

Once a vocational assessment process is complete, a student with a disability should be presented with a variety of training and work options, depending upon the results of the evaluation. Many options and directions are available.

This NASET Professional Development Course provides an overview of employment options and procedures necessary for the preparation of a student with disabilities to adult life. After reading this section, you should understand the following:

  • Internships and Apprenticeships
  • Adult education
  • Trade and Technical Schools
  • Competitive Employment
  • Supported Employment
  • How Do Parents Know If Their Children Need Supported Employment?
  • Sheltered Workshops
  • Other Avenues to Employment
  • Volunteering
  • International Exchange Programs
  • The Military
  • Starting and Maintaining a Business
  • Job Search Methods
  • Developing a Resume
  • Job Application Forms
  • Ways of Finding a Job
  • Applying and Interviewing for Jobs

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EPILEPSY-STAFF DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

Epilepsy-Staff Development Brief - According to the Epilepsy Foundation of America, epilepsy is a physical condition that occurs when there is a sudden, brief change in how the brain works. When brain cells are not working properly, a person's consciousness, movement, or actions may be altered for a short time. These physical changes are called epileptic seizures. Epilepsy is therefore sometimes called a seizure disorder. Epilepsy affects people in all nations and of all races. This course will present a basic overview of students with epilepsy.


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EXTENDED SCHOOL YEAR SERVICES

Extended School Year Services - Congress enacted the Education of All Handicapped Children’s Act in 1975 to ensure that all children with disabilities receive FAPE. In 1991, with the passage of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), Congress reiterated that central standard. Inherent in the provision of FAPE is the principle that education must be individualized to meet the unique needs of each child. Because each child’s education is determined by an IEP team, specific criteria for the determination of the need for ESY were not prescribed by IDEA.

As the school year ends, parents may want to know if their children are entitled to Extended School Year Services (ESY). These services are provided to children with special needs that the school feels may lose his/her knowledge of what they learned over the summer months unless they are given added services during this time. The need for ESY services must be determined on an individual basis by the CSE.

Some students with disabilities have difficulty retaining skills during long school holidays and/or summer. If a student requires a significant amount of time to recoup mastered skills, then the IEP committee should discuss whether the student needs extended educational and/or related services during school breaks.

The determination of whether a child will receive ESY services will be made by the IEP committee; and the individualized education program (IEP) developed for ESY must include goals and objectives.

This program of services is paid for by the district and is of no cost to parents. Because of the nature of such services, all cases are determined on an individual basis, since these services will not be required by all students with disabilities. Such services are given only when the child meets certain criteria outlined by law and district policy.

Any decision regarding needed ESY programming must consider the child's history of significant regression and limited recoupment capability.  In other words, the IEP Team must look backward and forward when considering the need for ESY programming.

In addition to significant regression (the significant loss of knowledge) and/or limited recoupment (the ability to gain back what is lost), courts have set forth other ESY criteria to be applied by a Team, as follows:

  1. the degree of the child's impairment
  2. the parents' ability to provide structure at home
  3. the child's rate of progress
  4. the child's specific behavior and/or physical problems
  5. the availability of alternative resources
  6. the child's ability to interact with non-disabled children
  7. the specific curricular areas in which the child needs continuing attention
  8. the vocational and transition needs of the child
  9. whether the service requested is "extraordinary" rather than usual in consideration of the child's condition.

Only when all factors are considered together by the child's Team can a determination be made as to how much service will be offered.

When there is no previous record of a child's substantial regression after a significant break in service, a Team should still consider the need for an ESY program if the following circumstances are present:

  1. there is lack of progress in meeting short-term objectives over two marking periods, resulting in little or no progress made over the school year
  2. there are significant regression/recoupment problems over short-term vacation periods or other breaks in the school year, and /or
  3. the unique nature of any specially designed instruction or related services due to the disability of the student requires such extended school year programming.

Since proposed ESY programming must take into account the probability of substantial regression, school districts should ensure that special education service providers maintain quantitative and qualitative data regarding the child, including anecdotal records on the rates of both learning and relearning, as well as a child's attainment of IEP goals and objectives.

The focus of this NASET Professional Development Course will be on extended school year services. After taking this course, you should understand the following:

  • Definition of Extended School Year Services
  • What are NOT ESY Services
  • Eligibility for Extended School Year Programs and Services
  • Obligation to Provide Extended School Year Programs
  • Deciding if a Student Needs Extended School Year Services
  • IEPs and ESY
  • Programs and Services with ESY
  • Length of Time for ESY
  • Recreational Programs and ESY
  • Specialized Instruction and ESY
  • Transition Services and ESY
  • Paraprofessionals and ESY
  • Concluding Thoughts

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FACTORS AFFECTING CURRICULUM FOR STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

Factors Affecting Curriculum for Students with Special Needs - As a general education teacher working with students with special needs you will be heavily involved in teaching curriculum. It is therefore important that you understand the many factors that may sometimes interfere in the ability of these students to perform up to their ability while in school. Children are faced with many pressures everyday and as a result these pressures may play a role in their ability to fully concentrate in school. What you notice as a general education teacher may only be symptoms of these pressures i.e. procrastination, avoidance, resistance, lack of completion of a task, lack of attention etc. However, the real reasons behind these behaviors should be known by you so that you can, along with the special education teacher, make accommodations or adaptations to the curriculum to help these students succeed. This course is geared to informing you of the 8 factors that contribute to problems in curriculum performance by students with special needs.


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GRADING STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

Grading Students with Disabilities - Grading is best understood as a shorthand method of communicating complicated information about student learning and progress. A grade, such as a grade on a report card, is a summary of a teacher’s judgment of the adequacy of a student’s achievement at a particular point in time. Report card grades should reflect a student’s achievement relative to the curriculum standards he or she is working toward. When parents, teachers, or schools raise issues of grading fairness and equity, it is often the result of confusion regarding the purposes for grades, and whether a “one-size-fits-all “grading system can work for learners with special needs, including those with learning disabilities. For a grading system to be fair and equitable, it must have as its philosophical basis a belief that fairness is defined as maintaining equity and meeting individual needs – not necessarily as “equality,” which is treating all students exactly the same (Great Schools, 2015). Grading students with disabilities poses additional dilemmas. Grading systems used in general education classes are usually ill-equipped for individualization to meet the needs of a particular student, and research has documented that special education students in general education classes are at risk of receiving low or failing grades. General and special educators often fail to collaborate effectively to coordinate the general grading system with the accommodations and modifications required under a student's Individualized Education Program (IEP). Even when a classroom teacher wants to individualize a grading system for a student with a disability, the teacher often lacks knowledge of how to do it. Thus, many students with disabilities receive inaccurate and unfair grades that provide little meaningful information about their achievement. The focus of this NASET professional development course will be on issues pertaining to grading students with disabilities and recommendations for teachers.


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INTRODUCTION TO LEARNING DISABILITIES

Introduction to Learning Disabilities - Learning disability is a general term that describes specific kinds of learning problems. A learning disability can cause a person to have trouble learning and using certain skills. The skills most often affected are: reading, writing, listening, speaking, reasoning, and doing math. Almost 3 million children (ages 6 through 21) have some form of a learning disability and receive special education in school. In fact, over half of all children who receive special education have a learning disability. This course will provide you with a basic understanding of learning disabilities.  The content includes a general overview on learning disabilities pertaining to the IDEA definition , prevalence, causes, signs and characteristics, types, detection, and treatment.


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HEARING IMPAIRMENTS: CRITERIA FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION

Hearing Impairments: Criteria for Determining Eligibility for Special Education - This course will provide you with the criteria and process used in the determination of special education eligibility for children with the suspected disability of hearing impairments.  It is designed in a step-by-step format for the reader to gain a greater understanding of how diagnoses are made, and the specific requirements for eligibility.


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HIGH RISK STUDENTS IN THE CLASSROOM: IDENTIFICATION IN THE CLASSROOM

High Risk Students in the Classroom:  Identification in the Classroom - One of the most important tools that an educator can possess is the understanding of symptoms exhibited by students that may indicate a high risk situation. While you may be involved with children with disabilities, you can often not help but see, hear about, or uncover a child that is struggling in school and whose problems may be going unnoticed.  Whether these high risk students have potential educational disabilities or other issues that may require intervention, the faster the child is identified the better chance he/she has in avoiding serious and long lasting problems. Therefore it is imperative that special educators have a pulse on the “red flag” symptoms that high risk children exhibit. This course will provide an overview of the process for identification of High Risk Students.


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IEP (INDIVIDUAL EDUCATION PROGRAM): AN OVERVIEW

IEP (Individual Education Program):  An Overview - As general education teachers involved with students with special needs you have been given a very important responsibility in the education of these children. Our experience has shown that the resistance to working with children with disabilities usually develops from a lack of understanding, education, and skill knowledge on the part of the teachers. Once general education teachers are provided these skills and knowledge they can offer a tremendous amount to students with special needs in an inclusion setting, a mainstream setting for a child in a special education class, or in collaboration with the resource room teacher who the child sees every day from your class. The purpose of this course is to familiarize you with the Individual Education Plan (IEP) written for every child with special needs. While you may never be asked to write an IEP, you will provide certain information that will be included into the final version. In order to make this a very practical course we will assume nothing and explain everything that we feel you will need to know to have a working knowledge of this area of special education.


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Intellectual Disability

Intellectual Disability-Intellectual Disability is a term used when a person has certain limitations in mental functioning and in skills such as communicating, taking care of him or herself, and social skills. These limitations will cause a child to learn and develop more slowly than a typical child. Children with Intellectual Disability may take longer to learn to speak, walk, and take care of their personal needs such as dressing or eating. They are likely to have trouble learning in school. They will learn, but it will take them longer. There may be some things they cannot learn. This course will present a basic overview of students with Intellectual Disability.


INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY: CRITERIA FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION

Intellectual Disability: Criteria for Determining Eligibility for Special Education - This course will provide you with the criteria and process used in the determination of special education eligibility for children with the suspected disability of Intellectual Disability.  It is designed in a step-by-step format for the reader to gain a greater understanding of how diagnoses are made, and the specific requirements for eligibility.


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LEARNERS WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES - A Video Lecture Course

Learners with Intellectual Disabilities * Video Lecture Course - This NASET professional development course will provide an overview of learners with intellectual disabilities. After taking this course, you should understand the following:

Definition of intellectual disabilities
Prevalence of intellectual disabilities
Levels and Intensities of Support
Degrees of intellectual disabilities
Causes of intellectual disabilities
Characteristics of children with intellectual disabilities
Classroom management strategies for children with intellectual disabilities

This is a course that contains two video lectures, an accompanying PowerPoint Presentation file and PDF of the PowerPoint slides for your notes.


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LEARNERS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES - A Video Lecture Course

Learners with Learning Disabilities - A Video Lecture Course - Learning disability is a general term that describes specific kinds of learning problems. A learning disability can cause a person to have trouble learning and using certain skills. The skills most often affected are: reading, writing, listening, speaking, reasoning, and doing math. Learning disabilities (LD) vary from person to person. One person with LD may not have the same kind of learning problems as another person with LD. As many as 1 out of every 5 people in the United States has a learning disability. Almost 1 million children (ages 6 through 21) have some form of a learning disability and receive special education in school. In fact, more than one-third of all children who receive special education have a learning disability. This NASET professional development course focuses on teaching students with learning disabilities.  Topics covered include:

  • Definition of learning disabilities
  • Processing disorders
  • Visual processing disorders
  • Auditory processing disorders
  • Processing speed
  • Types of learning disabilities
  • Discrepancy formulas
  • Causes of learning disabilities
  • Characteristics of children with learning disabilities
  • Teaching strategies for children with learning disabilities

This course contains two video lectures, an accompanying PowerPoint Presentation file and PDF of the PowerPoint slides for your notes.


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LEARNING DISABILITIES: CRITERIA FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR SPECIAL EDUATION

Learning Disabilities: Criteria for Determining Eligibility for Special Education - This course will provide you with the criteria and process used in the determination of special education eligibility for children with the suspected disability of specific learning disabilities.  It is designed in a step-by-step format for the reader to gain a greater understanding of how diagnoses are made, and the specific requirements for eligibility.


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MEDICATION: AN OVERVIEW FOR PROFESSIONALS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION

Medication: An Overview for Professionals in Special Education - It is important for you to be well informed about medications. You should always be aware that you are to never give advice in any form concerning medications and any questions asked of you about medications should be referred to the child’s doctor. You should know what medications your students take and the dosage, and learn everything you can about them. Almost any substance that can change behavior can cause harm if used in the wrong amount or frequency of dosing, or in a bad combination. Drugs differ in the speed, duration of action, and in their margin for error. As a teacher, you may be the first person to recognize these problematic symptoms or side effects. This course is designed to help special education teachers understand how and why medications can be used as part of the treatment of mental health problems and how they may effect the student in your classroom.


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MULTIPLE DISABILITIES: CRITERIA FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION

Multiple Disabilities: Criteria for Determining Eligibility for Special Education - This course will provide you with the criteria and process used in the determination of special education eligibility for children with the suspected disability of multiple disabilities.  It is designed in a step-by-step format for the reader to gain a greater understanding of how diagnoses are made, and the specific requirements for eligibility.


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ORTHOPEDIC IMPAIRMENTS: CRITERIA FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION

Orthopedic Impairments: Criteria for Determining Eligibility for Special Education - This course will provide you with the criteria and process used in the determination of special education eligibility for children with the suspected disability of orthopedic impairments.  It is designed in a step-by-step format for the reader to gain a greater understanding of how diagnoses are made, and the specific requirements for eligibility.


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OTHER HEALTH IMPAIRMENTS: CRITERIA FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION

Other Health Impairments: Criteria for Determining Eligibility for Special Education - This course will provide you with the criteria and process used in the determination of special education eligibility for children with the suspected disability of other health impairments.  It is designed in a step-by-step format for the reader to gain a greater understanding of how diagnoses are made, and the specific requirements for eligibility.


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RECREATION AND LEISURE ACTIVITIES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

Recreation And Leisure Activities For Students With Disabilities - Studies indicate that between 12 and 20 percent of the American population - perhaps 40 million people - have some type of disability. That's a huge segment of U.S. society that historically has been denied access to outdoor recreation - by facilities built with only able-bodied people in mind, by a lack of special equipment and by a lack of special consideration.

In recent years, however, two things have helped open the outdoors to individuals with disabilities: First, across the nation there are several nonprofit groups with the mission of improving the quality of life for people with disabilities by providing opportunities for outdoor recreation, often using specially adapted equipment.

Another door to the outside opened in 1990, when Congress passed the landmark Americans with Disabilities Act. It ensures basic civil rights for individuals with disabilities, and requires that, on any facility built for public use, reasonable efforts be made to provide access to people with a lack of mobility.

Since then, hundreds of outdoor recreational facilities built with government funds have been designed to make access easier for the wheelchair-bound and people using walkers, canes or crutches.

Armed with the law, activists for individuals with disabilities began lobbying state and local agencies for other opportunities. Access for individuals with disabilities in the outdoors has multiplied exponentially with the construction of state and federal projects. In this NASET Professional Development Course, you will learn about:

  • Overview of Leisure Options
  • Importance of Leisure
  • Activities to Explore
  • Fitness Activities
  • Home Activities
  • Community Activities
  • · Sports Activities
  • Issues for Special Educators
  • Planning for Success
  • Considerations Before Embarking on New Leisure Pursuits
  • Advantages of Special Leisure Programs
  • Individual Concerns When Faced with Leisure Activities
  • Mastering Leisure Activity Skills

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PERVASIVE DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS

Pervasive Developmental Disorders -  As a result of the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5) being published, the term Pervasive Developmental Disorder is no longer used in the nomenclature. However, since people still refer to it, we are presenting a history of PDD in this course. The term Pervasive Developmental Disorders was first used in the 1980s to describe a class of disorders. This class of disorders has in common the following characteristics: impairments in social interaction, imaginative activity, verbal and nonverbal communication skills, and a limited number of interests and activities that tend to be repetitive. Over the past few years, PDD has become a subject of increased attention among parents, professionals, and policymakers across the country. This course is designed to answer some of the most commonly asked questions regarding PDD and to provide concerned individuals with other resources for information and support.


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POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION AND STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: A GUIDE FOR HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATORS

Postsecondary Education And Students With Disabilities: A Guide For High School Educators- Several years ago, students with disabilities had limited choices when it came to choose a college or university that could provide accommodations. With the advent of the Americans with Disabilities Act, and the disabilities rights movement, accommodations for students with disabilities became commonplace. Now, one can apply to several different types of postsecondary educational institutions.

Colleges offer an opportunity for individuals with disabilities to continue their education and earn tangible evidence of education such as a certificate or degree. Junior and community colleges offer a variety of courses that, upon successful completion of the prescribed courses, may lead to a certificate or associate degree. Community colleges are publicly funded, have either no or low-cost tuition, and offer a wide range of programs, including vocational and occupational courses. They exist in or near many communities; generally, the only admissions requirement is a high school diploma or its equivalent. Junior colleges are usually privately supported, and the majority provides programs in the liberal arts field. Four-year colleges and universities offer programs of study that lead to a bachelor's degree after successful completion of four years of prescribed course work.

In high school, the school district was responsible for providing any or all support services necessary for an individual with disabilities to participate in the educational process. The college or university does not have the same legal obligation. They are required by law to provide any reasonable accommodation that may be necessary for those with disabilities to have equal access to educational opportunities and services available to peers without disabilities, if requested.

Title II of the ADA covers state-funded schools such as universities, community colleges, and vocational schools. Title III covers private colleges and vocational schools. If a school receives federal dollars, regardless of whether it is private or public, it is also covered by the regulation of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, requiring schools to make their programs accessible to qualified students with disabilities.

Under the provisions of Section 504, universities and colleges may not:

  • limit the number of students with disabilities
  • make preadmission inquiries as to whether an applicant is disabled
  • exclude a qualified student with a disability from a course of study
  • discriminate in administering scholarships, fellowships and so on, on the basis of a disability
  • establish rules or policies that may adversely affect students with disabilities

For college students with disabilities, academic adjustments may include adaptations in the way specific courses are conducted, the use of auxiliary equipment, and support staff and modifications in academic requirements. These modifications may include:

  • removing architectural barriers
  • providing services such as readers, qualified interpreters, or note takers for deaf or hard-of-hearing students
  • providing modifications, substitutions, or waivers of courses, major fields of study, or degree requirements on a case-by-case basis
  • allowing extra time to complete exams
  • using alternative forms for students to demonstrate course mastery
  • permitting the use of computer software programs or other assistive technological devices to facilitate test-taking and study skills

The focus of this NASET Professional Development Course will be to cover the following areas related to postsecondary education and students with disabilities:

  • Disability-Related Support Services
  • Social Skills
  • Financial Aid
  • Disability Related Expenses
  • Vocational Rehabilitation and Financial Aid
  • Issues to Consider When Looking into Postsecondary Education
  • Frequently Asked Questions about the Admissions Process
  • Checklist for Assessing Colleges for Accessibility
  • Accommodations for Specific Disabilities
  • Distance Learning and Adults with Disabilities
  • Enrolling in a Distance Learning Program Selecting a Program
  • Access to the Student Services at the College
  • Conclusion:  Keys to Success

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POST TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER-STAFF DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder-Staff Development Brief - A diagnosis of PTSD means that an individual experienced an event that involved a threat to one's own or another's life or physical integrity and that this person responded with intense fear, helplessness, or horror. There are a number of traumatic events that have been shown to cause PTSD in children and adolescents. Children and adolescents may be diagnosed with PTSD if they have survived natural and man made disasters such as floods; violent crimes such as kidnapping, rape or murder of a parent, sniper fire, and school shootings; motor vehicle accidents such as automobile and plane crashes; severe burns; exposure to community violence; war; peer suicide; and sexual and physical abuse. This Staff Development Brief will provide you with a good overview of this very important topic.


 

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RELATED SERVICES: AN OVERVIEW

Related Services: An Overview - The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Amendments of 2004 mandates that "...all children with disabilities have available to them a free appropriate public education [FAPE] that emphasizes special education and related services designed to meet their unique needs and prepare them for employment and independent living". In accordance with the IDEA '04 and other federal laws, more than 5.9 million children with disabilities (ages 3 through 21) across the nation received special education and related services in the 1997-98 school year (U.S. Department of Education, 1999b).  What, precisely, are related services, and why are they an important part of educating children with disabilities? Who is eligible for related services, and how are related services delivered? This course examines the answers to these and other questions.


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RETT SYNDROME

Rett SyndromeAs a result of the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5) being published, the term Rett Syndrome is no longer used in the nomenclature. However, since people still refer to it, we are presenting an overview of Rett Syndrome in this course. Rett syndrome is a childhood neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by normal early development followed by loss of purposeful use of the hands, distinctive hand movements, slowed brain and head growth, gait abnormalities, seizures, and intellectual disability. It affects females almost exclusively. The disorder was identified by Dr. Andreas Rett, an Austrian physician who first described it in a journal article in 1966. It was not until after a second article about the disorder was published in 1983 that the disorder was generally recognized. This course will provide the reader with an excellent insight into this autistic disorder.


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ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHER

Roles and Responsibilities of the Special Education Teacher: The special education teacher in today’s schools plays a very critical role in the proper education of exceptional students.  The teacher is unique in that he/she can fit many different roles in the educational environment. However, each of these distinct roles involves a variety of responsibilities and functions. Understanding these responsibilities can only help the special educator become more familiar with the role and increase the chances for success. For instance, the special education teacher can be assigned to a variety of different educational situations. These different situations will be described in this course.



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SCHIZOPHRENIA

Schizophrenia - Schizophrenia is a chronic, severe, and disabling brain disorder that has been recognized throughout recorded history. It affects about 1 percent of Americans. People with schizophrenia may hear voices other people don't hear or they may believe that others are reading their minds, controlling their thoughts, or plotting to harm them. These experiences are terrifying and can cause fearfulness, withdrawal, or extreme agitation. People with schizophrenia may not make sense when they talk, may sit for hours without moving or talking much, or may seem perfectly fine until they talk about what they are really thinking. Because many people with schizophrenia have difficulty holding a job or caring for themselves, the burden on their families and society is significant as well. This course will provide an excellent and thorough overview of this topic.


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SELF DETERMINATION: A GUIDE FOR HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATORS

Self Determination: A Guide For High School Educators - One of the most significant concepts to emerge in the last few decades is the awareness of the importance of self-determination in the life of an individual with a disability. For too long, professionals made decisions for people with disabilities with little input from the individual or parents. While these decisions were motivated by good intentions, they may have overlooked the desires, hopes, and aspirations that remained hidden within the person with disabilities. As our society has become more sensitive to the needs and rights of the disabled, we have moved to the concept of self-determination as a crucial element in the design of a life plan.

Self-determination is a person's ability to control his or her own destiny. A crucial part of the concept of self-determination involves the combination of attitudes and abilities that will lead children or individuals to set goals for themselves, and to take the initiative to reach these goals. To do this one must be in charge, which is not necessarily the same thing as self-sufficiency or independence, make his or her own choices, learn to solve problems effectively, take control and responsibility for his or her life, learn to experience and cope with the consequences of making decisions on his or her own.

Martin and Marshall summarize the evolving definition of self-determination in the special education literature as describing individuals who, “know how to choose-they know what they want and how to get it. From an awareness of personal needs self-determined individuals choose goals, and then doggedly pursue them. This involves asserting an individual’s presence, making his or her needs know, evaluation progress toward meeting goals, adjusting performance and creating unique approached to solve problems”.

Self-determination is the process by which a person controls his or her own life. This is important to everyone. According to Tom Nerney, Executive Director of the Center for Self-Determination, the five principles of self-determination are:

  • Authority
  • Confirmation
  • Support
  • Freedom
  • Responsibility

Developmental disability systems support self-determination when:

  • People have the freedom to plan their own life and to pursue the things that are important to them with the support of independent planning and support coordination.
  • People have the freedom to experience the same life opportunities as other people their age, connected with others in their communities.
  • Each person has authority over his own individual support budget.
  • All those involved demonstrate confirmation of the critical role self-advocates and their families must play in making decisions in their own lives and in designing and operating the system they rely on.
  • People have the freedom to choose and set up the support they need to pursue the life they envision.
  • People enjoy the freedom of economic independence and security, with opportunities to earn adequate income.
  • People take responsibility for decisions in their lives and for the support money allocated to them with the assistance of an independent fiscal intermediary.

This NASET Professional Development Course will focus on self-determination and students with disabilities. After taking this course you should understand the following:

  • Overview of Self-Determination
  • Development of Self-Determination Skills
  • Learning Self-Determination
  • Research on Self-Determination
  • Community Inclusion and the Importance of Self-Determination
  • Social Inclusion and the Importance of Self-Determination
  • Self-Advocacy and the Importance of Self-Determination
  • Promoting Self-Determination in Youth with Disabilities: Tips for Families and Professionals
  • Closing Thoughts

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SELF ESTEEM - UNDERSTANDING THE FOUNDATIONS OF SELF-ESTEEM AND DEVELOPING IT IN THE CLASSROOM

Self-Esteem is feeling good about yourself.  Because it is a feeling, self-esteem is expressed in the way that people behave.  However, success is important for the growth of positive feelings about oneself. High self-esteem will allow your students to keep failure situations in proper perspective. Whether or not a failure situation is perceived as a learning experience, or as a self-punishment, depends on one's level of self-esteem.

Children as well as adults will vary in the type of self-esteem exhibited.  We all feel more confident on some days than others.  Feeling low self-esteem from time to time is not a problem.  However, a pattern of low self-esteem should be observed for there to be a concern.  Teachers can easily observe children's self-esteem by seeing what they do and how they accomplish it.


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SOCIAL AND SEXUAL ISSUES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: A GUIDE FOR HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATORS

Social And Sexual Issues For Students With Disabilities: A Guide For High School Educators - Today, because of the work of advocates and people with disabilities over the past half-century, American society is acknowledging that those with disabilities have the same rights as other citizens to contribute to and benefit from our society. This includes the right to education, employment, self-determination, and independence. We are also coming to recognize, albeit more slowly, that persons with disabilities have the right to experience and fulfill an important aspect of their individuality, namely, their social life and sexuality. As with all rights, this right brings with it responsibilities, not only for the person with disabilities, but also for that individual's parents and caregivers. Adequately preparing an individual for the transition to adulthood, with its many choices and responsibilities, is certainly one of the greatest challenges that parents, and others face.

In the course of human development, there is probably no greater need than to attach, connect or build gratifying human relationships. This human need is felt by all, whether with a disability or not. It is vital that all children be given the opportunities to learn and practice the social skills considered appropriate by society. All children must learn how to conduct themselves in ways that allow them to develop relationships with other people. Parents must keep in mind that social skills pervade an individual's entire life, at home, in school, in the community, and at the workplace. An example of the significance of a deficit in social skills appears to be that a large percentage (nearly 90 percent) of employees lost their jobs because of poor attitude and inappropriate behavior, rather than the lack of job skills.

Children with disabilities may find developing these skills more difficult than their peers without disabilities. Because of a variety of learning or other cognitive disabilities, visual or hearing impairments, or a physical disability that limits their chances to socialize, children with disabilities may lack the exposure and experiences required to develop appropriate social skills. Most, however, are capable of learning these important "rules" (Duncan & Canty-Lemke, 1986) and should be given opportunities to learn and practice them by professionals, parents and professionals.

The focus of this NASET Professional Development Course will be to address various concerns related to individuals with disabilities and their social and sexual issues. After taking this course, you should understand the following:

  • The importance of developing social skills
  • Acquiring social skills
  • How families can help widen social experiences
  • Avoiding social mistakes
  • Fostering relationships: Suggestions for young adults
  • Misconceptions about sexuality and disability
  • Defining sexuality
  • How sexuality develops
  • Sexuality education
  • Suggestions for teaching children and youth about sexuality
  • Early Signs of Puberty
  • Issues to address with the adolescent
  • The Importance of Developing Social Skills

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SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES: HOW CHILDREN ARE IDENTIFIED

Special Education Services: How Children are Identified - In order to survive as a general education teacher working with children with special needs, it is important to become very familiar with the process by which children are identified as having a disability. This process is called the special education process and involves a number of steps that must follow federal, state, and district guidelines. These guidelines have been created to protect the rights of students, parents and school districts and as a result you must be knowledgeable to assist parents and students through this involved process. This course will instruct in the basics of the special education process and how students are identified for special education services.


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SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES: QUESTIONS OFTEN ASKED BY PARENTS

Special Education Services: A Parent's Guide - Parents often have many questions when they suspect that their child may have a disability. This course is designed to answer some of the most commonly asked questions regarding special education, the process of special education, IEPs, and many other relevant information. It has been developed expressly to respond to the information needs of parents by answering the most common questions regarding special education.


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SPEECH AND LANGUAGE IMPAIRMENTS

Speech and Language Impairments - More than one million of the students served in the public schools’ special education programs in the 2000-2001 school year were categorized as having a speech or language impairment. Speech and language disorders refer to problems in communication and related areas such as oral motor function. These delays and disorders range from simple sound substitutions to the inability to understand or use language or use the oral-motor mechanism for functional speech and feeding. This course is designed to present a basic overview of speech and language impairments and to provide concerned individuals with other resources for information and support.


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SPEECH AND LANGUAGE IMPAIRMENTS: CRITERIA FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION

Speech and Language Impairments: Criteria for Determining Eligibility for Special Education - This course will provide you with the criteria and process used in the determination of special education eligibility for children with the suspected disability of speech and language impairments.  It is designed in a step-by-step format for the reader to gain a greater understanding of how diagnoses are made, and the specific requirements for eligibility.


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SPINA BIFIDA-STAFF DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

Spina Bifida-Staff Development Brief - Spina Bifida means cleft spine, which is an incomplete closure in the spinal column. Although spina bifida is relatively common, until recently most children born with a myelomeningocele died shortly after birth. Now that surgery to drain spinal fluid and protect children against hydrocephalus can be performed in the first 48 hours of life, children with myelomeningocele are much more likely to live. Successful integration of a child with spina bifida into school sometimes requires changes in school equipment or the curriculum. This course is designed to present a basic overview of  spina bifida and to provide concerned individuals with other resources for information and support.


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TOURETTE SYNDROME

Tourette Syndrome - Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurological disorder characterized by repetitive, stereotyped, involuntary movements and vocalizations called tics. TS occurs in people from all ethnic groups; males are affected about three to four times more often than females. It is estimated that 200,000 Americans have the most severe form of TS, and as many as one in 100 exhibit milder and less complex symptoms such as chronic motor or vocal tics or transient tics of childhood. Although TS can be a chronic condition with symptoms lasting a lifetime, most people with the condition experience their worst symptoms in their early teens, with improvement occurring in the late teens and continuing into adulthood. The focus of this course will be to provide you with a general understanding of TS.  Course content includes information on TS pertaining to: definition, symptoms, course of action, tics, causes, disorders associated with it, diagnosis, treatment, inheritance, prognosis, and appropriate educational settings.


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TRANSITION PLANNING: A TEAM EFFORT

Transition Planning: A Team Effort - The completion of high school is the beginning of adult life. Entitlement to public education ends, and young people and their families are faced with many options and decisions about the future. The most common choices for the future are pursuing vocational training or further academic education, getting a job, and living independently. This course provides ideas and information on how students, families, school personnel, service providers, and others can work together to help students make a smooth transition. In particular, it focuses on creative transition planning and services that use all the resources that exist in communities, not just the agencies that have traditionally been involved.


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TRANSITION OF STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES TO POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION

Less than 30 years ago, students with disabilities had limited choices when it came to choosing a college or university that could provide accommodations. However, with the enactment of the Americans with Disabilities Act, along with the disabilities rights movement, accommodations for students with disabilities have become more commonplace. Now, a student with a disability is able to apply to several different types of postsecondary educational institutions.

Colleges offer an opportunity for individuals with disabilities to continue their education and earn tangible evidence of education, such as a certificate or degree. Junior and community colleges offer a variety of courses that, upon successful completion of the prescribed courses, may lead to a Certificate or Associate's degree. Community colleges are publicly funded, have either no or low-cost tuition, and offer a wide range of programs, including vocational and occupational courses. They exist in or near many communities; generally, the only admissions requirement is a high school diploma or its equivalent. Junior colleges are usually privately supported, and the majority provides programs in the liberal arts field. Four-year colleges and universities offer programs of study that lead to a Bachelor’s degree after successful completion of four years of prescribed course work.

In high school, school districts are responsible for providing any or all support services necessary for an individual with disabilities to participate in the educational process. Colleges and universities do not have the same legal obligation. They are required by law to provide any reasonable accommodation that may be necessary for those with disabilities to have equal access to educational opportunities and services available to peers without disabilities, if requested.

The focus of this NASET Professional Development course is to address the transition of students with disabilities to postsecondary education.


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TRANSITION SERVICES ON THE IEP: A GUIDE FOR HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATORS

Since the passage of the Education for All Handicapped Children Act (EHA), Public Law 94-142, in 1975, Individualized Education Programs (IEP) have been a requirement of law for all children and youth with disabilities found eligible for special education. Each student’s IEP must list goals and objectives for educational activities and include information about the student's assessment and educational placement, the instructional content areas to be addressed throughout the year, the timelines and persons responsible for activities corresponding to the goals and objectives, how student progress will be evaluated, and the related services that each student needs to benefit from his or her special education. With the newest amendments to the EHA -- now entitled the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, or IDEA - a new component has been added to the IEP. Beginning no later than age 16 (under the federal law; states may differ), each student now must also have included in the IEP a statement of the transition services that he or she needs to prepare for such post-school outcomes as employment, postsecondary education, adult services, independent living, and community participation. Traditionally, the IEP has been designed for a maximum of one year, breaking annual goals into short-term objectives. With the addition of transition services, the IEP becomes longer term, with objectives spanning across several years. For the first time, planning is oriented towards life after high school, with plans including adult services agencies and community agencies, where applicable. This is an enormous step forward in the concept of preparing students educationally, and requires a great deal of insight, foresight, and planning on the part of students, parents, and school and other agency professionals.

The focus of this NASET Professional Development is course is to provide an overview of the various issues involved in transition services in the IEP for high school educators.


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TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

Traumatic Brain Injury - A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an injury to the brain caused by the head being hit by something or shaken violently. This injury can change how the person acts, moves, and thinks. A traumatic brain injury can also change how a student learns and acts in school. More than one million children receive brain injuries each year. More than 30,000 of these children have lifelong disabilities as a result of the brain injury. This course is designed to present a basic overview of traumatic brain injury and to provide concerned individuals with other resources for information and support.


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TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY: CRITERA FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION

Traumatic Brain Injury: Criteria for Determining Eligibility for Special Education - This course will provide you with the criteria and process used in the determination of special education eligibility for children with the suspected disability of traumatic brain injury.  It is designed in a step-by-step format for the reader to gain a greater understanding of how diagnoses are made, and the specific requirements for eligibility.


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TRAVEL TRAINING FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: A GUIDE FOR HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATORS

Travel Training For Students With Disabilities: A Guide For High School Educators - Transportation provides us all with access to the wider opportunities of society employment, postsecondary education, job training programs, recreation. Traveling by car, by cab, or by public transportation systems such as bus and subway enables us to go to work and come home, go to school or other training programs, visit friends, take care of daily needs such as grocery shopping, and enjoy recreational activities.

Yet, many individuals with disabilities have traditionally been isolated from these societal opportunities, because they lacked a means of transportation. For many, driving a car was not possible, due to a visual, physical, or cognitive disability. Public transportation systems were often inaccessible due to structural barriers. Still other individuals were unable to use the transportation systems that were available, because they lacked the training, or "know-how," to use these systems safely.

Today, the lack of access to transportation that many individuals with disabilities have experienced is changing. Recently enacted federal legislation clearly intends to ensure that people with disabilities have an equal opportunity to participate independently and successfully in society. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) recognizes the critical role that public transportation plays in the lives of many people and mandates that public transportation systems become accessible to people with disabilities. It also mandates that paratransit services are available and accessible to individuals who are unable to use public transportation.

Unfortunately, availability of transportation is not the only impediment to independent travel for people with disabilities. They must also know what systems of transport are available, how to access these, how to plan their travel, and how to execute their travel plans safely. For many individuals, learning how to travel on public transportation requires systematic training. Travel training, then, is often a crucial element in empowering people with disabilities to use the newly accessible transportation systems in our country.

To this end, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) can be of importance. The IDEA requires public schools to provide what are known as "transition services" to youth with disabilities, to prepare them for the transition from school to adult life. While accessible transportation and transportation training are not specifically mentioned within IDEA, clearly the ability to use available transportation systems may be critical to a student's transition into the adult world. Thus, both the ADA and the IDEA provide individuals with disabilities, their families, school systems, service providers, community agencies, and transit systems with compelling incentives to work together to ensure that individuals with disabilities learn how to use accessible transportation.

The focus of this NASET Professional Development Course will be to discuss transportation concerns of students and adults with disabilities. After taking this course, you should understand the following:

  • Overview of Travel Training
  • Skills Required for Traveling Independently
  • Beginning Travel Training
  • The Process of Travel Training
  • The Necessity of Travel Training Programs
  • Benefits from Travel Training Programs
  • The Importance of Equal Access to Transportation
  • Where to Look for Travel Training Programs
  • Travel Training Guidelines for People with a Cognitive Disability
  • Travel Training Guidelines for People with a Physical Disability
  • What to Look For in a Travel Training Program
  • Teaching Travel Skills to Persons who are Blind or with Visually Impairments
  • Evaluating the Quality of Programs that Teach Travel Skills
  • Public Transportation and the ADA

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VIOLENCE AND DISASTERS: HELPING CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS COPE

Violence and Disasters: Helping Children and Adolescents Cope - Helping young people avoid or overcome emotional problems in the wake of violence or disaster is one of the most important challenges a parent, teacher, or mental health professional can face. Many agencies are working to address the issue of assisting children and adolescents who have been victims of or witnesses to violent and/or catastrophic events. The purpose of this course is to tell what is known about the impact of violence and disasters on children and adolescents and suggest steps to minimize long-term emotional harm. This course will provide educators with a very good overview and practical suggestions for helping students cope with this experience.


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VISUAL IMPAIRMENTS: AN OVERVIEW

Visual Impairments:  An Overview - The effect of visual problems on a child's development depends on the severity, type of loss, age at which the condition appears, and overall functioning level of the child. Many children who have multiple disabilities may also have visual impairments resulting in motor, cognitive, and/or social developmental delays. The rate at which visual impairments occur in individuals under the age of 18 is 12.2 per 1,000. This course is designed to present a basic overview of visual impairments and to provide concerned individuals with other resources for information and support.


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VISUAL IMPAIRMENTS: CRITERIA FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION

Visual Impairments: Criteria for Determining Eligibility for Special Education - This course will provide you with the criteria and process used in the determination of special education eligibility for children with the suspected disability of visual impairments.  It is designed in a step-by-step format for the reader to gain a greater understanding of how diagnoses are made, and the specific requirements for eligibility.


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VOCATIONAL ASSESSMENT AND TRAINING: A GUIDE FOR HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATORS

Vocational Assessment and Training: A Guide for High School Educators - Crossing the threshold from the world of school to the world of work brings a significant change in everyone's life. School is an entitlement, meaning that it is an environment that our system of government supplies for all of our citizens. The workplace is the opposite; no one is entitled to a job.

One of the most important aspects of transition planning is the preparation of students for the world of work. Up to now, the focus has been on helping students fulfill the educational requirements for graduation from a secondary school. Now comes a very real and practical issue that can create many concerns. With the proper information and resources, this next phase of the transition process can also be very rewarding. Parents and educators must fully understand vocational options to help children make the best decisions for his or their future.

The purpose of this section is to give you a strong working knowledge of vocational assessments. After taking this NASET Professional Development Course, you should understand the following:

  • Overview of Vocational Assessments
  • Purpose of Vocational Assessments
  • Trends in Vocational Assessment
  • The Vocational Assessment Process
  • Informal and Formal Assessment
  • Levels of Vocational Assessment
  • Level I Vocational Assessment
  • Level II Vocational Assessment
  • Level III Vocational Assessment
  • Components of a Vocational Assessment
  • Other Assessment Options during the Vocational Transition Phase
  • Situational Vocational Assessment
  • Confidentiality
  • Specific Professionals Trained to Help Parents and Their Children Plan and Prepare for Employment
  • · Skills Checklist
  • Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS)
  • Services Provided by DRS Agencies
  • Rights and Responsibilities When Involved with DRS Services
  • Conflict Resolution Options with DRS

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