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Accommodations/Modifications

  • General Accommodations: Resources, Tips, and Suggested Accommodations for Students who are Blind or Visually Impaired.
  • Academic accommodations: Students who have a disability, particularly a learning disability, are a rapidly growing population on college campuses. Though it is difficult to obtain accurate figures, between 3 and 10 percent of college students report having physical or learning disabilities that require compensatory classroom teaching accommodations (City University of New York Committee for the Disabled, 1988; Project EASI, 1991; Smith, 1989). Such accommodations are neither difficult to provide nor distracting to the rest of the class. In fact, many of these accommodations may make learning easier for all your students.

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Advocacy Information

  • Advocacy-how to do it- a primer: Believing in your child is essential. No doctor, therapist, professional, or anyone knows your child better than you do. You have lived with your child with a disability longer and more intimately than anyone else. Only you have the long perspective. The big picture. Trust that knowledge.

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Anatomy and Physiology

  • Diagram of the Eye - (National Eye Institute).  An excellent interactive diagram of the eye's anatomy. 
  • Normal Eye Anatomy - (National Eye Institute).  A rich selection of resources and informational pages regarding the anatomy of the human eye.

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Assessment

  • Assessment tools: Locating appropriate tools to help develop appropriate IEP goals in the wide range of areas impacted by a visual impairment is a formidable task. We have so far compiled the following listing of assessment tools used and recommended by professionals of the visually impaired to evaluate their students' skills.

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Assistive Technology

  • Braille and Speak and e-mail FAQ: This document provides basic information on how to the Blazie Engineering family of note-takers to use E-mail or connect to the Internet. The Blazie note-takers include Braille n’ Speak, Type n’ Speak, and Braille Lite. BNS will be used through out this document to represent any of the devices. This is not a curriculum (although that may come in the future).
  • Various types of assistive technology explained: Assistive technology products are designed to provide additional accessibility to individuals who have physical or cognitive difficulties, impairments, and disabilities. When selecting assistive technology products, it is crucial to find products that are compatible with the computer operating system and programs on the particular computer being used.

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Audio/Video Tapes

  • Books and videos: Educational books and videos written by professionals at the Center and experts in the field are available to parents, educators and specialists throughout the world. From the Blind Children's Center.

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Causes

  • Neurological Visual Impairment: Neurological Visual Impairment (NVI) is now the preferred name for a type of vision impairment that has been and is still referred to as Cortical Visual Impairment or Cortical Blindness. NVI is now divided into three categories: Cortical Visual Impairment, Delayed Visual Maturation, and Cortical Blindness. These divisions are made according to what area of the brain has been effected.

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Characteristics

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Classifications or Types

  • Types and degrees of visual impairments - Visual impairments in young children can result from a number of different conditions which affect functioning of the eyes. Some of these conditions can be improved or corrected with eye glasses or surgery while others cannot.

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Classroom Management

  • Ideas for vision stimulation activities - These ideas for vision simulation activities were compiled by Diane Childers, a school-age consultant in the Outreach Department of the Indiana School for the Blind. They are intended to be used with sighted children (or adults) to help them understand how a visually impaired individual does and learns things.
  • Checklist for cortical visual loss - A child may be suspected of having a cortical visual loss when the extent of visual loss is unexplained by ocular abnormalities. Etiologies may include cerebral palsy, asphyxia, intracerebral hemorrhage, and meningitis.
  • Early intervention - The intervention needs of infants and toddlers differ considerably from those of children with visual impairments (VI) and blindness who are kindergarten age and older. Early intervention for infants and toddlers should be family-centered while also addressing VI-specific needs.
  • Glossary - MBLYOPIA ("lazy eye"): a visual defect that affects approximately 2 or 3 out of every 100 children in the United States. Amblyopia involves lowered visual acuity (clarity of sight) in one eye which can not be corrected by glasses or contact lenses. The result is often a loss of stereoscopic vision (3D) and depth perception. Vision therapy can improve this condition. Early detection and treatment offer the best outcome...
  • Community based instruction - The following is the scope and sequence I developed to assist CBI teachers in knowing how to teach community skills, and what is appropriate at what age. It is highly based on orientation rather than techniques as it wasn't written for Visually Impaired. If you add the necessary techniques for O & M as you go along, it can help keep you focused. It also gives you lots of things to teach other than cane skills and crossing streets.
  • In the regular classroom - To help you understand how you, too, can be successful in integrating a blind preschooler into a regular program here are some answers to common concerns expressed by preschool teachers and administrators. Remember that this is only an overview of common concerns. The National Organization of Parents of Blind Children (NOPBC) can help you with additional literature. We can also refer you to other local and national resources.
  • Orientation and mobility resources- A list of resources related to orientation and mobility for persons who are blind or visually impaired.
  • Dealing with students with low vision - Here's a an activity illustrating how a student with low vision "views" the teacher's presentations. This activity was given to college professors.
  • Social skills - As a blind adult who has not seen enough to observe body expressions and nonverbals visually, I wish to offer my strong support to Orientation and Mobility folks for picking up the slack where they can -- not that you all need one more job (smile!)
  • Materials adaptations: Braille, Large-print and electronic formats - A list of sources for materials adapted to Braille, large-print, and electronic formats.
  • Curriculum adaptations - A clean list of resources related to curriculum adaptations for students suffering from visual impairments.
  • Challenges in teaching math to the visually impaired - A college student working on her bachelor's degree in mathematics education asks questions about teaching a visually impaired student.
  • Ideas for vision stimulation activities - These ideas for vision simulation activities were compiled by Diane Childers, a school-age consultant in the Outreach Department of the Indiana School for the Blind. They are intended to be used with sighted children (or adults) to help them understand how a visually impaired individual does and learns things.
  • Questions kids ask about blindness - We receive many letters and questions from children who wish to learn more about blindness. It is important for blind children to learn that blindness will not prevent them from living happy and normal lives, and so blind children need to learn from good blind adult role models. We have developed this list of some of the most often asked questions by blind children, and we think it is just as important for sighted children, too.
  • Inclusive strategies for math - Math teachers need to verbalize everything they write on an overhead or blackboard and be precise with their language. If the Braille learner still has difficulty keeping up, the math teacher should be encouraged to give the student/vi teacher a copy of their overhead transparencies prior to class if pre-prepared or immediately after. Another alternative might be for a classmate to make a copy of their notes to share...
  • Inclusion-good overview of preparation - Visually impaired students need intervention beyond what their sighted peers require. There are laws designated to represent children with disabilities in the public school system.

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Clinical Trials

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Coping

  • Family and Friends Can Make a Difference! How to Help When Someone Close to You Is Visually Impaired - Family and friends often can provide support. However, they may need your assistance on the best ways to help, and when not to help.  These are some suggestions from people who are visually impaired (Lighthouse International).
  • Frequently Asked Questions about FCC Provisions for People with Disabilities - Telecommunications Relay Services, or TRS, enables telephone conversations between people with and without hearing or speech disabilities. TRS relies on communications assistants (CAs) to relay the content of calls between users of text telephones (TTYs) and users of traditional handsets (voice users) (Federal Communications Commission).
  • Living with Low Vision? - Take These Steps to Help Keep Your Independence Investigate! There are many places you can go for help if you have low vision. A number of agencies and organizations across the country can provide information about support and rehabilitation services, as well as other resources...
  • What Is Braille? - Braille is a series of raised dots that can be read with the fingers by people who are blind or whose eyesight is not sufficient for reading printed material. Teachers, parents, and others who are not visually impaired ordinarily read Braille with their eyes.

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Definition

  • Definition of vision therapy - Optometric vision therapy is an individualized treatment regimen prescribed for a patient in order to: Provide medically necessary treatment for diagnosed visual dysfunctions; Prevent the development of visual problems; or Enhance visual performance to meet defined needs of the patient.

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Diagnosis/Symptoms

  • Do You Have Low Vision? - An interactive questionnaire from the National Eye Institute.
  • Signs of Possible Eye Trouble in Adults - Unusual trouble adjusting to dark rooms; Difficulty focusing on near or distant objects; Squinting or blinking due to unusual sensitivity to light or glare; Change in color of iris; Red-rimmed, encrusted or swollen lids.

     

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Directories

  • Dog Guide Schools in the United States - A list of dog guide schools in the US from the American Foundation for the Blind.
  • Eye Health Organizations Database - Welcome to our new eye health organizations database. This tool can help you find sources of eye health-related information for the public. Many of these organizations can also refer you to resources in your local area.  (National Eye Institute)
  • Financial Aid for Eye Care - A variety of payment options are available for vision rehabilitation services.  Many agencies offer a sliding scale and will develop a payment plan based on your individual circumstances. Agency staff may also help to identify funding sources, including State Commissions for the Blind and Visually Handicapped, local school districts, Medicaid and Medicare.
  • Find an Eye M.D. - The American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) offers Find an Eye M.D., an on-line listing of member ophthalmologists practicing in the United States and abroad. (Americam Academy of Opthomology)
  • Finding an Eye Care Professional - The National Eye Institute does not provide referrals or recommend specific eye care professionals. However, you may wish to consider the following ways of finding a professional to provide your eye care. (National Eye Institute)
  • Grants-in-Aid for Adaptive Equipment - A list of resources related to financial assistance for adaptive computers and computer-assistive technologies for persons with print disabilities.
  • Guide to Computer Reading Options - There are many options for individuals with vision difficulties to modify the computer displays and appearance so it is more legible, or receive information through sound or touch. Those who are blind cannot use a computer monitor and but have the option to receive information from their computers through hearing or touch offered through screen readers and Braille displays.
  • Resources and Information for Parents about Braille - The following are resources that teach the Braille code. Please contact individual organizations and companies for detailed information and/or prices. (American Foundation for the Blind)
  • State Libraries for Persons with Print Disabilities - A list of state-run libraries for persons with print disabilities, from the American Foundation for the Blind.

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Disease Management

  • Maintaining Quality of Life with Low Vision - It is possible for people with vision impairments to continue to live independent and meaningful lives with the help of an occupational therapist. Practitioners can help people with low vision to continue living in their own homes and complete daily tasks, such as showering, dressing, cooking, grocery shopping, managing finances, and getting around in the community.

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Frequently Asked Questions

  • Low vision FAQ - Standard vision is measured as 20/20. A person is considered "visually impaired" if she can see no better than 20/70 with correction in her better eye. This means she can see at 20 feet what people with standard vision see at 70 feet. If an individual's vision is no better than 20/200, she is considered legally blind.
  • Deaf-blindness FAQ - Does DeafBlind mean completely blind and completely deaf? What is it like to be DeafBlind? What can DeafBlind people do? How do DeafBlind people communicate?

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From the National Institutes of Health

  • Questions to Ask about Low Vision - Although many people maintain good vision throughout their lifetimes, people over age 65 are at increased risk of developing low vision. You, your eye care professional, and specialist in low vision need to work in partnership to achieve what is best for you. An important part of this relationship is good communication.
  • What You Should Know about Low Vision - This booklet will help people with vision loss and their families and friends better understand low vision. It describes how to get help and live more safely and independently.(National Eye Institute)

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Genetics

  • Genetics Home Reference: Alström syndrome - Alström syndrome is a rare inherited condition that affects many body systems. Signs and symptoms of this condition begin in infancy or early childhood. Alström syndrome is characterized by progressive loss of vision and hearing, enlargement of the heart and weakening of cardiac muscle (cardiomyopathy), obesity, type 2 diabetes (the most common form of diabetes), and short stature. (National Library of Medicine)

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Latest News

  • U.S. Latinos Have High Rates of Eye Disease and Visual Impairment - Latinos living in the United States have high rates of eye disease and visual impairment, according to a research study, and a significant number may be unaware of their eye disease. This study, called the Los Angeles Latino Eye Study (LALES), is the largest, most comprehensive epidemiological analysis of visual impairment in Latinos conducted in the U.S.

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Laws and Policy

  • Consuming Interest: A Guide to Titles II and III of the ADA for People with Vision Loss - A document containing questions and answers about the ADA cannot address every barrier to access which you may face as a person who is blind, deaf-blind, or visually impaired. Rather, the questions and answers in this document have been carefully selected because they involve the application of ADA principles, concepts, and interpretations that should guide you when applying the ADA to your own real-life problems or situations. (American Foundation for the Blind)
  • Social Security: If You Are Blind How We Can Help - If you are blind, we have special rules that allow you to receive benefits when you are unable to work. We pay benefits to people who are blind under two programs: the Social Security disability insurance program and the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program. The medical rules we use to decide whether you are blind are the same for each program. Other rules are different. We explain the different rules for each program below. (Social Security Administration)

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Libraries

Magazines on Visual Impairment

  • Assistive Media - Audio recordings of selections from books and popular magazines.

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Miscellaneous Topics

  • Teaching math to visually impaired students - One of the most difficult challenges has been teaching concepts involving three-dimensional objects. 3-D problems are found in all levels of mathematics. They are often difficult for students with vision to understand, especially when trying to create 3-D objects in a two-dimensional drawing. Such a drawing, even when tactually raised, makes little sense without sighted "perspective."
  • Eye Disorders - A rich list of resources revolving around various eye disorders.
  • Syndromes and Rare Diseases - A rich list of resources revolving around various eye and vision-related syndromes and diseases.
  • Preschool Children with Visual Impairments - This booklet is written for Early Childhood Teachers who have (or may have) a visually impaired child among their students. It is not meant to be a comprehensive text; it is intended to be an introductory guidebook to help Early Childhood Teachers understand what a visual impairment is, how a visual impairment affects early development, and why early intervention is so critical to these children.
  • Links for Parents and Family - A rich list of resources for parents and family or people with visual impairments or blindness.
  • Selected Anomalies and Diseases of the Eye - Microsoft Word document.  This collection of eye diseases and anomalies was prepared for the Teacher of the Visually Impaired, who may need a rapid reference for consultative and interpretive purposes.
  • Calendar of Events - From the American Foundation for the Blind.
  • Schools for the blind - A rich list of schools by state for people with visual impairments or blindness.

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Organizations

  • American Council of the Blind - The American Council of the Blind is the nation's leading membership organization of blind and visually impaired people. It was founded in 1961 and incorporated in the District of Columbia.
  • Lighthouse International - Since 1905, Lighthouse International has been the leader worldwide in helping people who are blind or partially sighted overcome the challenges of vision loss.
  • National Federation of the Blind - The purpose of the National Federation of the Blind is two-fold—to help blind persons achieve self-confidence and self-respect and to act as a vehicle for collective self-expression by the blind. By providing public education about blindness, information and referral services, scholarships, literature and publications about blindness, aids and appliances and other adaptive equipment for the blind, advocacy services and protection of civil rights, development and evaluation of technology, and support for blind persons and their families, members of the NFB strive to educate the public that the blind are normal individuals who can compete on terms of equality.
  • Prevent Blindness America - Founded in 1908, Prevent Blindness America is the nation's leading volunteer eye health and safety organization dedicated to fighting blindness and saving sight.  Focused on promoting a continuum of vision care, Prevent Blindness America touches the lives of millions of people each year.
  • American Foundation for the Blind - The American Foundation for the Blind (AFB) is a national nonprofit that expands possibilities for people with vision loss. AFB's priorities include broadening access to technology; elevating the quality of information and tools for the professionals who serve people with vision loss; and promoting independent and healthy living for people with vision loss by providing them and their families with relevant and timely resources.
  • Canine Companions for Independence - Canine Companions for Independence is a non-profit organization that enhances the lives of people with disabilities by providing highly trained assistance dogs and ongoing support to ensure quality partnerships. CCI is funded by private contributions and receives no government funding. CCI graduates pay only a $100 Team Training registration fee that is reimbursed in supplies.
  • National Library Service for the Blind - Through a national network of cooperating libraries, NLS administers a free library program of braille and audio materials circulated to eligible borrowers in the United States by postage-free mail.
  • National Association for Parents of Children with Visual Impairments - NAPVI is a national organization that enables parents to find information and resources for their children who are blind or visually impaired, including those with additional disabilities. NAPVI provides leadership, support, and training to assist parents in helping children reach their potential.
  • American Optometric Association - As the premier authority in the optometric profession, the American Optometric Association leads the way in its mission of improving the quality and availability of eye and vision care everywhere. With more than 34,000 members serving nearly 6,500 American communities, AOA helps optometrists provide over two thirds of all primary eye care in the United States.
  • Foundation Fighting Blindness - The urgent mission of The Foundation Fighting Blindness, Inc. (FFB) is to drive the research that will provide preventions, treatments and cures for people affected by retinitis pigmentosa (RP), macular degeneration, Usher syndrome, and the entire spectrum of retinal degenerative diseases.
  • National Eye Institute - The National Eye Institute (NEI) was established by Congress in 1968 to protect and prolong the vision of the American people. As one of the Federal government's National Institutes of Health (NIH), the NEI conducts and supports research that helps prevent and treat eye diseases and other disorders of vision. This research leads to sight-saving treatments, reduces visual impairment and blindness, and improves the quality of life for people of all ages. NEI-supported research has advanced our knowledge of how the visual system functions in health and disease.

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Overview and General Information

  • Vision Impairment - Vision impairment means that a person's eyesight cannot be corrected to a "normal" level.  Vision impairment may be caused by a loss of visual acuity, where the eye does not see objects as clearly as usual.  It may also be caused by a loss of visual field, where the eye cannot see as wide an area as usual without moving the eyes or turning the head. (National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities)

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Parent Information

  • Glossary of terms - AMBLYOPIA ("lazy eye"): a visual defect that affects approximately 2 or 3 out of every 100 children in the United States. Amblyopia involves lowered visual acuity (clarity of sight) in one eye which can not be corrected by glasses or contact lenses. The result is often a loss of stereoscopic vision (3D) and depth perception. Vision therapy can improve this condition. Early detection and treatment offer the best outcome...
  • Vision therapy - Vision therapy can be described as physical therapy for the visual system which includes the brain and eyes. Through a series of progressive therapeutic procedures (eye exercises), patients develop or recover normal visual skills.
  • Organizing your kitchen - If you haven't used that great gadget for a year, toss it in the Give-Away box. If you've gone a whole year of holidays without making sugar cookies, that phase of your life is mercifully over and you can give away Charlie Brown, the great pumpkin, Santa, the Gingerbread Man, and all the other cookie cutters you couldn't live without. You will know the things you need by touch. If they don't have a layer of grease, dust or bread crumbs consider keeping them. Otherwise let them go. You can always shop again if you must.
  • Vision related services-Braille - A list of services and resources including Braille Jewelry, by C. Roule, Braille Music List, More resources about Braille music, Braille Remote Learning (BRL), Downloadable Braille Materials, Goosebumps Braille Books, Hot Braille, International Braille Research Center (IPRC), Math: Computerized, Spoken and Braille, Resources for learning and teaching Braille music, Tack-Tiles, Teaching Math to Visually Impaired Students, and World Braille Usage.
  • Orientation and mobility resources - A list of services and resources including Community-based Instruction Infusion Scope and Sequence, Guide Dogs and Other Transportation Modes, Kiddie Canes, Pre-canes, and Alternative Mobility Devices, Navigating without vision, Psychological Dynamics of the Teaching Process, Research on Tactile Maps, Sarah Blake's O&M Resources, Sighted Guide techniques, Tips on Hiring Drivers, and Travel Techniques for Persons Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired.

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Pictures/Diagrams

  • Eye Disease Simulations - A selection of photographs that have been modified to emulate the visual experience of persons suffering from various visual impairments, from the National Eye Institute.
  • Eye Examinations - A selection of photographs of people receiving and administering treatment and tests for various visual impairments, from the National Eye Institute.
  • Low Vision Devices - A selection of photographs depicting assistive devices in use by people suffering from various visual impairments, from the National Eye Institute.
  • Low Vision Simulations - A selection of photographs that have been modified to emulate the visual experience of persons suffering from low vision, from the National Weather Service.

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Prevalence

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Prevention

  • Checklist for Your Eye Doctor Appointment - Have you ever left the doctor's office and thought of a dozen questions you meant to ask? We all do that! This checklist of questions can help you make the most of your next visit to the eye doctor. (Prevent Blindness America)
  • Ergonomics Approach to Avoiding Workplace Injury - Exposure to adverse working conditions can result in momentary pain or long-term injury. Moreover, poorly designed working environments contribute to reduced efficiency, decreased production, loss of income, increased medical claims, and permanent disability. (American Industrial Hygiene Association)
  • How Often to Have an Eye Exam - Read this to see when you and your family should visit an Eye M.D. for a complete eye examination. Early detection and treatment of eye problems, along with protecting your eyes from accidental injury, are the best ways to take care of your vision throughout life.

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Research

  • Statement on the Prevalence of Visual Impairment and How It Affects Quality of Life Among Hispanic/Latino Americans - A new study reports that Hispanic/Latino individuals in the United States have higher rates of visual impairment and blindness than members of other ethnic groups. This is especially true of those who are older, unemployed, divorced or widowed, or less educated; and those with diabetes or any eye disease. Latinos whose vision is worse by two lines or more on a standard eye chart are more likely to report a lower quality of life. These research findings help suggest who among Hispanics should be targeted in public health campaigns related to eye disease awareness or the development of screening programs for eye disease. (National Eye Institute)
  • U.S. Latinos Have High Rates of Eye Disease and Visual Impairment - Latinos living in the United States have high rates of eye disease and visual impairment, according to a research study, and a significant number may be unaware of their eye disease. This study, called the Los Angeles Latino Eye Study (LALES), is the largest, most comprehensive epidemiological analysis of visual impairment in Latinos conducted in the U.S.
  • Important Interactions with Children Who Are Deaf-Blind - Harmonious Interactions, describes the importance of teaching families and educators the techniques to create and maintain high-quality interactions with children who are deaf-blind.  The report is based on research and training activities.

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Resources for Parents and Teachers on Braille

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Seniors and Visual Impairments

  • Creating a Comfortable Environment for Older Individuals Who Are Visually Impaired - Making a private or public environment comfortable and functional for individuals who are blind or visually impaired should be part of universal design for older people, benefitting all older individuals. (American Foundation for the Blind)
  • Services for Older Persons Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired - Older blind and visually impaired people need to learn new ways to accomplish routine daily tasks. These new skills enable older people to live independent and productive lives, minimizing the need for more costly in-home or nursing home care. (American Foundation for the Blind)
  • Vision Loss and Aging - In addition to normal changes in vision, older adults may experience eye disorders, health problems or injuries that can permanently affect eyesight — resulting in blurred or distorted images, or the loss of central or side vision. A number of conditions can potentially impair vision; the most common among them are macular degeneration, glaucoma, cataracts and diabetic retinopathy.

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Specific Conditions

  • Common Eye Myths - It's important to separate fact from fiction, especially when the topic is eyesight. Knowing how to take good care of your eyes is the first step to protecting your sight for a lifetime. (Prevent Blindness America)
  • Going to a Low Vision Center - What You Should Know and What to Expect - For those who are going to a low vision center for the first time, it can be an overwhelming and misunderstood experience for both the patient and the family. This article explores some key points, which may help you in your expectations and in minimizing frustrations before going to a low vision center. (Foundation Fighting Blindness)
  • Low Vision - If you have low vision, also known as partial sight, it's important to maximize the vision you have. You can take steps to do this by visiting a low vision doctor.
  • JAMA Patient Page: Causes of Visual Impairment - Visual impairment can happen to children or adults. In the United States, millions of persons have partial or complete loss of vision. It is important to have regular eye examinations to detect early stages of vision loss. The October 15, 2003, issue of JAMA includes an article about the causes of visual impairment. (American Medical Association)
  • Onchocerciasis (River Blindness) - The form of filariasis known as onchocerciasis or river blindness, caused by Onchocerca volvulus, is transmitted by a group of insects known as blackflies, which breed in fastmoving rivers and streams.

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Sports Opportunities for the Visually Impaired

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Statistics

  • Quick Facts and Figures on Blindness - Every seven minutes, someone in America will become blind or visually impaired. For more facts and figures on the 10 million blind or visually impaired individuals in the United States, see the following topics

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Teaching Strategies for Students with Visual Impairments

  • Effective Classroom Adaptations for Students with Visual Impairments - The degree of impairment and the student's background and training (like the degree of proficiency in Braille) will affect the usefulness of the various strategies and suggestions. The student with a vision impairment will most likely need assistance in all aspects of science programs. The various strategies given below will work for most vision impaired students--some may not.

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Teenagers and Visual Impairments

  • Blindness Awareness - For thousands of men, women, and children all around the world, things like grocery shopping and riding public transportation become more challenging because they are blind. Riding a bus and reading a cereal box label may seem pretty simple, but these are examples of challenges blind people face everyday. 
  • Visual Impairment - When one or more parts of the eye or brain that are needed to process images become diseased or damaged, severe or total loss of vision can occur. In these cases, vision can't be restored with medical treatment, surgery, or corrective lenses like glasses or contacts. (Nemours Foundation)

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Treatment

  • Eye Drops to Treat Childhood Eye Disorder Work As Well As Patching the Eye - Atropine eye drops given once a day to treat amblyopia, or lazy eye, the most common cause of visual impairment in children, work as well as the standard treatment of patching one eye. This research finding may lead to better compliance with treatment and improved quality of life in children with this eye disorder. (NIH)

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