September, 2004 Special Educator e-Journal

          

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Message from the President of NASET-Dr. Roger Pierangelo

What's New with IDEA?

  • Read the vote summary
  • Discussion of the bill on the Senate floor at:

US Department of Education Update

  • Secretary Paige Lauds No Child Left Behind Act: "The Law Is Working"
  • Close-Up: No Child Left Behind—Teacher-to-Teacher Initiative
  • New Guide!-Implementing Supplemental Educational Services
  • SchoolResults.org
  • Discretionary Grant Programs for Fiscal Year 2004
  • FY 2004 Discretionary Grant Application Packages
  • Barnes & Noble K-12 Grants-(Program Funding)
  • Funding News

U.S. Office of Special Education Update

  • The History of IDEA
  • The Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) Publishes Part Two of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Resource for School and Home
  • The 24th Annual Report to Congress

U.S. Office of Vocational and Rehabilitation Services Update

  • Students with Disabilities to Gain Improved Access to Learning
    Legal Issues Corner
  • Supreme Court Decision in Lane vs. Tennessee an Historic Ruling

Legal Issues Corner

Practical Tips for Working with Children with Special Needs

The National Institute of Mental Health Update

  • Combination Treatment Most Effective for Adolescents with Depression
  • Schizophrenia Gene Variant Linked to Risk Traits

Early Intervention Update

  • Early Intervention Information and Resources Specific to a Certain Disability

The National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities

  • Resources for Including Children with Disabilities in State and District-Wide Assessments
  • Disability Publishers

NASET Member Accomplishments

Controversial Issues

Useful Web Sites for Special Educators

  • Tutor for Kids
  • The ABCs of Bullying: Addressing, Blocking, and Curbing School Aggression
  • The ABCs of Bullying: Addressing, Blocking, and Curbing School Aggression Online Tutorial (2004)-(Educational Course)
  • ADD/ADHD in the Workplace (2004)
  • Job Creation Can Make Employment Work Online Training Conference: Abuse of Persons with Disabilities (2004)-(Educational Course)
  • SSA Office of Policy 
  • American Association of People with Disabilities Emerging Leader Awards (2004)-Adult Scholarship
  • School Admits Girl, Her Dog
  • National Dispute Resolution Use and Effectiveness Study
  • Increasing School Completion: Learning from Research-Based Practices that Work
  • The National Dropout Prevention Center for Students with Disabilities 
  • Web Cast (Teleconference Transcript) Employability Skills Training and Implementation Program (2004)-(CD-ROM)
  • Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities of Youth Service Practitioners: The Centerpiece of a Successful Workforce Development System (2004)-(Report)
  • The National Research Center on Learning Disabilities Responsiveness-to-Intervention Symposium (December 2003)-(Web Site)
  • The National Survey of Community Rehabilitation Providers (September 2004)-(Brief)
  • Access Center Webinar: Mathematics Instruction for Students with Special Needs- September 7, 2004 (2:00-3:00 pm (EDT: Web-based Event) 
  • Developmental Disabilities Leadership Forum
  • Disability Studies for Teachers

Upcoming Conferences and Events for September and October, 2004

Parents Page

  • Back-to-school Resources for Parents, Students, and PTAs
  • THE BEATITUDES-For Friends of Exceptional Children
  • September 7 Marks National AD/HD Awareness Day
  • THROUGH THE EYES OF A CHILD WITH A.D.D.
  • The Healthy Student -- A Parent's Guide to Preparing Teens for the College Years (2004)-(Brochure)
     

Acknowledgements

Message from the President of NASET-

Dr. Roger Pierangelo

Welcome to NASET’s first E-Journal of the 2004-2005 academic year-The Special Educator….and most importantly, welcome back to school.  The first month of the school year brings with it loads of excitement, ranging from setting up classroom, meeting your students, parent-teacher night, and many more exciting activities.  We hope that your school year has begun successfully.  This edition of the Special Educator covers a very broad range of topics.  If you find the time, feel free to write to us and let us know what you think.  The Special Educator E-Journal is designed for you, so anything you feel we can do to enhance it’s practicality, readability, and overall usefulness, would be extremely helpful for us to know.  We welcome those of you who are new to NASET or those who are reading this as the example newsletter.  For those of you who have joined NASET, welcome.  For those of you who are thinking about becoming a member, we hope that you take the time to read through all of the various materials, including this Special Educator, in order to make an educated decision.  We are confident that when you see all that NASET has to offer, this will be an association of which you will want to be a member.  Whether you are a member or non-member, NASET wishes you a wonderful and successful school year.

What's New with The Individuals with


Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)?


IDEA Passes in the Senate!  S. 1248, the bill to reauthorize the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), passed the Senate by a vote of 95 to 3. Senators Jeffords (I-VT) and Leahy (D-VT) opposed the bill, because it lacked provisions to require mandatory full funding. Senator Stabenow (D-MI) also voted against passage. Not voting were Senators Coleman (R-MN) and Kerry (D-MA).

US Department of Education Update

Secretary Paige Lauds No Child Left Behind Act: "The Law Is Working"

In his remarks at the 2004 National Urban League Conference in Detroit on July 22, U.S. Secretary of Education Rod Paige celebrated the achievements of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) in helping to improve learning for all students. The following is an excerpt of his remarks:

"Four years ago, this is what we saw when we arrived in Washington: we saw a de facto system of educational apartheid. This is no exaggeration of the facts. Millions of children were being left behind. …."This is the why of NCLB. ... No Child Left Behind requires accountability, testing and inclusiveness. It empowers parents with more information and more choices. It enables students in need to obtain tutoring and mentors. ...

"We know that No Child Left Behind is starting to generate some amazing results, transforming the educational landscape. We already see considerable evidence that the law is working.

"In the most recent results on the Nation's Report Card, or NAEP, the mathematics scores for fourth- and eighth-graders rose significantly across the board. Importantly, African-American, Hispanic-American and low-income students accounted for some of the most significant improvements. As a result, the achievement gap is closing. Further evidence comes from a recent report by the Council of the Great City Schools, which reviewed test scores from 61 urban school districts in 37 states. Students in the largest urban public school systems showed significant improvement in reading and math in the first year under No Child Left Behind.

"And last week, the nonpartisan Education Commission of the States found that most states are well on the way to meeting most of the requirements under the law. ...

"We still have a long way to go, especially in meeting requirements for highly qualified teachers. But this report is a milestone in documenting the revolutionary changes under way and in showing that the law is achievable. ..."

Close-Up: No Child Left Behind—Teacher-to-Teacher Initiative

Over the summer break, the U.S. Department of Education brought together some of the nation's most effective teachers and education experts to share with their colleagues strategies for successful teaching and learning. At seven regional locations, educators from across the country assembled for the Department's Teacher-to-Teacher Summer Workshops, which highlighted the latest effective practices for raising student achievement, making data-driven decisions and working with special populations.

The workshops are part of the Department's efforts to provide support to teachers in fulfilling the mission of No Child Left Behind. "By giving teachers the tools they need to achieve at their best," said U.S. Secretary of Education Rod Paige, "we can help every student achieve at his or her best as well."

The workshops provided an array of training sessions, including Data and Graphing, Developing Computational Fluency in Addition and Subtraction, Reading Strategies for Special-Needs Students and Federal Resources. Over 1,400 participants attended the workshops in Denver, Colo., Portland, Ore., Pittsburgh, Pa., Orlando, Fla., Anaheim, Calif., St. Louis, Mo., and Boston, Mass.

Hoping to extend its reach in the future, the Education Department expects teacher participants to return to their school districts and share what they have learned. "Teachers work so hard and they are so anxious to make sure they are doing it right. These summits bring together the best of the best," praised one workshop participant. "I hope you will not only repeat, but expand, your offerings to many more teachers."

To complement the summer workshops, the Department also welcomed more than 150 teachers to a Research-to-Practice Summit July 19-20, at its headquarters in Washington, D.C. (See p. 2.)

The summit is part of the Bush administration's Teacher-to-Teacher initiative to support America's teachers, which also includes the seven regional workshops, roundtable discussions, a teacher toolkit and weekly e-mail updates.

Ten of the best sessions from the workshops and summit will be available later this fall via the Internet and satellite television. For more information, visit www.teacherquality.us or call 1-800-USA-LEARN.

New Guide!-Implementing Supplemental Educational Services

Under No Child Left Behind, if a school served by Title I does not meet its academic achievement targets for three years, the school district must offer supplemental educational services to students from low-income families. Now, parents of these students who have been unable to afford the extra academic help their children need, can select among supplemental educational services programs approved by the state.

To assist school districts with implementing these services, the U.S. Department of Education recently released the guide Creating Strong Supplemental Educational Services Programs. Published by the Department's Office of Innovation and Improvement, the guide shares practical advice and concrete examples from five school districts whose experiences yield some common lessons that might be helpful to others working on supplemental educational services.

Among its successes, Toledo Public Schools stepped up its outreach campaign to eligible parents, which led to the enrollment of more than 500 students in supplemental educational services, compared to 96 the previous year. The other districts highlighted in the publication are Forsyth County Schools, Georgia; Los Angeles Unified School District, California; Rochester City School District, New York; and San Diego City Schools, California.

The 61-page publication includes samples of an announcement flier, enrollment form, parent survey and progress report from the school districts. Included also are appendices showing each district's demographics, the report's methodology for collecting data, and additional resources for implementing supplemental educational services.

For a paper copy, contact the Department's publications center at 1-877-4ED-PUBS.

Launched by the School Information Partnership, a public-private collaborative, this online resource is a one-stop shop of timely and comparable education data on schools, school districts, and states nationwide. The site's data tables display information that is required to be publicly reported under No Child Left Behind: adequate yearly progress, reading and math assessments by grade, enrollment, and teacher qualifications. This Web site also contains a suite of interactive analytical tools which allow users, for example, to create side-by-side comparisons and search higher-performing schools or districts within the state based on selected criteria. http://www.schoolresults.org/

Discretionary Grant Programs for Fiscal Year 2004

This document lists virtually all programs and competitions under which the U.S. Department of Education has invited or expects to invite applications for new awards for fiscal year 2004 and provides actual or estimated deadline dates for the transmittal of applications under these programs. The lists are in the form of charts organized according to the Departments principal program offices and include programs and competitions previously announced as well as those to be announced at a later date.  For complete details, visit: http://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/find/edlite-forecast.html

FY 2004 Discretionary Grant Application Packages

This site, from the Department of Education, provides information on grant competitions that are currently open.  For complete details, visit: http://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/grantapps/

Barnes & Noble K-12 Grants-(Program Funding)

Through its stores, Barnes & Noble provides funding to local and regional efforts to promote literacy and the arts in K-12 education. Proposals should include a literacy or arts component that fosters both student achievement and community growth. Grant recipients must plan to promote the program with Barnes & Noble and must be willing to work with the local store(s) on
in-store programming. Potential applicants should visit a store in their area to receive more information. All nonprofits supporting the arts, literacy, or K-12 education are eligible to apply. Applications are reviewed on a continuing basis.  For complete details, visit:
http://www.barnesandnobleinc.com/company/codonation/co_donation.html

Funding News

Quality Mall's "Funding News" department lets you search the most current funding opportunities by date, program title, or name of sponsor. This online resource is updated weekly with nationwide grant opportunities. You can also sign up for free Funding News E-mail alerts.
http://www.qualitymall.org/funding/index.asp?code=072904&id=1649

U.S. Office of Special Education Update

The History of IDEA

Read about the History of IDEA and the 25 years of progress of educating individuals with Disabilities.  For complete details, visit http://www.ed.gov/policy/speced/leg/idea/history.html

The Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) Publishes Part Two of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Resource for School and Home


OSEP announces a new publication, Teaching Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Instructional Strategies and Practices. The report, designed for teachers, other school staff, and families, describes an overall strategy for successfully instructing students with ADHD. Suggestions of research-based academic instruction, behavioral interventions and classroom accommodations are provided.  For more details, visit: http://www.ed.gov/about/reports/annual/osep/index.html#adhd-res2

The 24th Annual Report to Congress

http://www.ed.gov/about/reports/annual/osep/2002/index.html

U.S. Office of Vocational and Rehabilitation

Services Update

Students with Disabilities to Gain Improved Access to Learning

Students with blindness, low vision and print disabilities are expected to gain improved access to textbooks under a voluntary standardized format for electronic files, U.S. Secretary of Education Rod Paige announced today. On behalf of Secretary Paige, Deputy Secretary of Education Gene Hickok discussed the new standard at an event commemorating the 14th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The event was co-sponsored by the Departments of Commerce and Education in Washington, D.C.

"President Bush believes that every single child can learn and deserves the opportunity to learn—that's why he pushed for the historic education reforms of the No Child Left Behind Act," Secretary Paige said. "Today, we're taking another step toward this goal with a new, voluntary standard that will enable students and teachers to more quickly access general curriculum materials, thereby opening more doors of opportunity to students."

When textbooks and classroom materials are produced using this voluntary standard, they will be in a standard electronic format that can be adapted to products ranging from Braille editions of textbooks to on-screen displays of text and graphics. In past years, the lack of a standardized format meant that publishers had to produce materials in multiple formats—often causing delays that meant students with disabilities did not receive their textbooks in time for the beginning of the school year.

To address these challenges, the Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs provided funding to the National Center on Accessing the General Curriculum at the Center for Applied Special Technology, Inc. to convene an expert panel to establish a voluntary, standardized format for materials. The 40-member panel included educators, publishers, technology specialists and advocacy groups.

In addition to establishing the new standard, the Department of Education will fund two centers to support further development and assist states with implementing the voluntary standard, thus improving academic results for students with disabilities.

The No Child Left Behind Act is the bipartisan landmark education reform law designed to change the culture of America's schools by closing the achievement gap among groups of students, offering more flexibility to states, giving parents more options and teaching students based on what works. Under the law's strong accountability provisions, states must describe how they will close the achievement gap and make sure all students, including students with disabilities, achieve academically.
For more information on the National Instructional Materials Accessibility Standard, please visit http://www.cast.org/NFF/NIMAS/.

Legal Issues Corner

Supreme Court Decision in Lane vs. Tennessee an Historic Ruling

The National Organization on Disability joined disability advocates nationwide in celebrating the Supreme Court of the United States’ decision in the case of Tennessee Vs. Lane in favor of the plaintiffs in the case, people with disabilities demanding their right to access state courthouses and other government buildings.  For complete details, visit:
http://www.nod.org/content.cfm?id=1522

Practical tips

Practical Tips for Teachers Working

with Children with Special Needs

Checklist for Classroom Teachers-ADHD  Visist this site to view suggestions from 450 surveyed teachers.  http://www.newideas.net/p0000570.htm

Classroom Interventions, Tips, and Resources

In this section, view hundreds of ideas for teachers to help children with Attention Deficit Disorder

http://www.newideas.net/p0000497.htm

The National Institute of Mental Health Update

Combination Treatment Most Effective for Adolescents with Depression

A clinical trial of 439 adolescents with major depression has found a combination of medication and psychotherapy to be the most effective treatment. Funded by the NIH's National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the study compared cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) with fluoxetine, currently the only antidepressant approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in children and adolescents. John March, M.D., Duke University, and colleagues, report on findings of the multi-site trial in the August 18, 2004, "Journal of the American Medical Association" (JAMA).

The results of the first 12 weeks of the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS), conducted at 13 sites nationwide, show that 71 percent responded to the combination of fluoxetine and CBT. The other three treatment groups, of participants between the ages of 12 and 17, also showed improvement, with a 60.6 percent response to fluoxetine-only treatment, and 43.2 percent response from those receiving only CBT. The response rate was 34.8 percent for a group that received a placebo. The difference in response rates for the latter two treatment groups was not statistically significant.

The $17 million study is the first large, federally funded study using an antidepressant medication to treat adolescents suffering with moderate to severe depression. TADS was conducted between the spring of the year 2000 and the summer of 2003.

Clinically significant suicidal thinking, which was present in 29 percent of the volunteers at the beginning of the study, improved significantly in all four treatment groups, with those receiving medication and therapy showing the greatest reduction.

For more information, visit http://www.nimh.nih.gov/press/prtads.cfm

Schizophrenia Gene Variant Linked to Risk Traits

Researchers at the NIH's National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) have identified a relationship between a small section of one gene, the brain chemical messenger glutamate, and a collection of traits known to be associated with schizophrenia. The finding confirms the gene responsible for management of glutamate is a promising candidate in determining risk for schizophrenia. The study, conducted by Michael Egan, M.D., Daniel Weinberger, M.D., and colleagues, is in the August 24th issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, published online the week of August 9, 2004.

Glutamate is a key neurotransmitter long thought to play a role in schizophrenia. The gene identified in this study makes the glutamate receptor (GRM3), which is responsible for regulating glutamate in synapses—spaces in between brain cells—where chemicals like glutamate transfer information from cell to cell. The amount of glutamate remaining in the synapse may have a downstream impact on cognition.

"Because of the small effects of individual genes in complex genetic disorders like schizophrenia, it is difficult to make significant associations with any one particular marker. However, this study brings us closer to unlocking the genetic clues that increase the risk for schizophrenia," said NIMH Director Thomas R. Insel, M.D.

Researchers know that schizophrenia affects several regions in the front part of the brain that are involved in higher order thinking and decision-making and neurotransmitter systems like glutamate. Many of the genes already identified as likely candidates for the disorder have been thought to affect the glutamate system. The study implicates the GRM3 gene as well.

GRM3 alters glutamate transmission, brain physiology and cognition, increasing the risk for schizophrenia. To pinpoint the section of the gene responsible for these changes, scientists are exploring a region where the gene may differ by one letter at a location called SNP4. The normal variation is spelled with either an 'A'-the more common of the two-or a 'G'. Patients with schizophrenia are more likely to inherit an 'A' from either parent, indicating the 'A' variant slightly increases risk. The 'A' variant is also associated with the pattern of traits linked with the disorder. This was true in patients, their healthy siblings, and normal volunteers.

In the study, people with an 'A' variant have differences in measures of brain glutamate. In a postmortem study of brain tissue, the 'A' variant was associated with lower levels of the chemical that promotes gene expression for the protein responsible for regulating the level of glutamate in the cell. N-acetylaspartate, a measure of cell health evaluated through the use of MRI spectroscopy, was lower in 'A' participants. 'A' carriers had poorer performance on several cognitive tests of prefrontal and hippocampal function than people with the 'G' variant. The 'G' marker was associated with relatively more 'efficient' processing in the prefrontal cortex. Those who inherit the 'G' variant scored higher on verbal and cognitive tests than those who have two of the 'A' variant. Scientists think the less common 'G' variant may exert a protective effect against the disease.

People with schizophrenia and their healthy siblings share the inefficient brain physiology, and cognition patterns, which suggests a link to genetic risk, though the disease itself is most likely caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. The gene seems to affect the mechanism of memory encoding only as there was no genotype effect seen during retrieval in the memory tests.

Although scientists could not be certain that the 'A/G' difference accounts for all the affects on brain function, there may be yet undiscovered variations located near SNP4 on the GRM3 gene. It is unclear as to why the higher-risk 'A' variant is more common in humans. Researchers speculate that it may provide a counterbalancing advantage, perhaps related to reduced glutamate in the cells.

Early Intervention Update

Early Intervention Information and Resources Specific to a Certain Disability

The National Dissemination Center for Children

with Disabilities

Resources for Including Children with Disabilities in State and District-Wide Assessments

The National Dissemination Center for Children and Yout with Disabilities (NICHCY) recently connected readers with sources of information on including children with disabilities in state and district-wide assessments. This is an area of considerable concern and endeavor for state and local education agencies, educators, and families alike. Federal law--specifically, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)--requires that students with disabilities be included in large state or district assessment programs. In order to enable children with disabilities to participate in such general assessments, appropriate accommodations may be made, as necessary, as well as modifications in how the assessments are administered (including individual modifications, as appropriate). The decision as to whether a particular child will participate in a particular assessment belongs to the IEP team. The IEP team also specifies what accommodations or modifications that child will need in order to participate.

However, a student's IEP team may also determine that the student cannot participate in a particular State or district-wide assessment of student achievement or part of such an assessment, even with modifications. If this is the case, the team must include a statement in the IEP as to why the assessment is not appropriate for the student and how he or she will be assessed. Under the law, the state or local education agency (SEA / LEA) must then assess the child using an alternate assessment.

It's complicated---and yet very important. There is enormous pressure for accountability, and states routinely use high stakes testing programs that require students to reach a specified competency level in order to graduate. Thus, how these tests affect students with disabilities is an area of continuing concern. We hope the resources we've listed below will be useful to parents and professionals alike. They focus upon discussions of what high stakes testing means for students, what types of accommodations and modifications states are using to enable their participation, and what alternate assessments are being designed for students whose IEP teams determine that they cannot participate in a particular state or district test.

The list below isn't intended to be exhaustive of the resources available on including children with disabilities in state and district assessments---it's ever-growing. NASET thanks NICHCY for the use of this information for it’s newsletter

What's Required---and Why?

  • Frequently asked questions--and answers.
    www.education.umn.edu/nceo/TopicAreas/Participation/participation_FAQ.htm
    The participation of students with disabilities in state and district assessments is a special topic area of the National Center on Educational Outcomes (NCEO). If this topic is new to you, you'll want to start your investigation with NCEO's FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions). What do you want to know? NCEO tries to answer the questions most people start with.
  • Education reform: What does it mean for students with disabilities? http://ici2.umn.edu/ntn/pub/briefs/edre.html
    This brief will tell you why there's such a fuss about assessments, how students with disabilities participated in the past, and how they'll participate now.
  • All Kids Count: Including students with disabilities in statewide assessment programs. http://fcsn.org/peer/assess.htm
    The guide you'll find at the link above is a product of the PEER Project, a technical assistance project formerly funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs. All Kids Count is intended as a basic primer on the participation of students with disabilities in statewide assessment systems. Its purpose is to give parents, parent leaders, professionals, and other interested parties basic guidelines and points of reference for participating in discussions around policies and practices related to the inclusion of students with disabilities in large-scale assessment programs.
  • Assessing students with disabilities: Issues and evidence. www.cse.ucla.edu/reports/TR587.pdf
    This 2003 report discusses major issues raised by the inclusion of students with disabilities in large-scale assessments and summarizes pertinent research.
  • Any guidance from the feds? www.dssc.org/frc/fed/OSEP01-06.FFAssessment.pdf
    Guidance on Including Students with Disabilities in Assessment Programs is available from the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), U.S. Department of Education. Find the family-free version at the link above. The same information, prepared for state directors of special education, is available at: www.dssc.org/frc/AssessmentQ%26A.html
  • What are the positive aspects of including students with disabilities in assessment programs? www.education.umn.edu/nceo/OnlinePubs/Synthesis51.html
    When investigators document the consequences of high stakes assessments for students with disabilities, many negative consequences are cited. The National Center on Educational Outcomes (NCEO) examined both empirical and anecdotal evidence for positive consequences of large-scale high-stakes assessments for students with disabilities. This report synthesizes their findings.

Test Accommodations

  • Accommodations: Making it possible for students to show you "what they got." www.education.umn.edu/nceo/TopicAreas/Accommodations/Accom_topic.htm
    And we're back at the National Center on Educational Outcomes (NCEO), because they're the experts! Check out their resources on testing accommodations, which are "changes in testing materials or procedures that enable students to participate in assessments in a way that allows abilities to be assessed rather than disabilities." This NCEO special topic area includes, among other things, an Introduction to Accommodations (the link above) and an FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions). Find out what accommodations are, what categories they fall into, and when you'd wanna make one (or two...) for a student with a disability.
  • When you make a change to the test, what happens?www.ihdi.uky.edu/msrrc/PDF/Tindal&Fuchs.PDF
    If you make an accommodation, does it make the student's test results any less valid? This 1999 summary addresses the issue of validity with primary consideration on using this research to implement sound testing practices and to make appropriate educational decisions.
  • A summary of research on test changes.
    http://education.umn.edu/nceo/onlinepubs/Technical34.htm
    This 2002 paper, entitled "A Summary of Research on the Effects of Test Accommodations: 1999 through 2001," summarizes research on the effects of test accommodations, including: type of assessment, content area assessed, number of research participants, types of disabilities included in the sample, grade-level of the participants, research design, research findings, limitations of the study, and recommendations for future research.
  • Try the Online Accommodations Bibliography.
    http://education.umn.edu/nceo/AccomStudies.htm
    The Online Accommodations Bibliography, at the National Center on Educational Outcomes (NCEO), allows users to search a compilation of empirical research studies on the effects of various testing accommodations for students with disabilities. Convenient, eh? The research you'll find is the same as what's summarized in the article cited and linked in the last bullet, plus additional research studies presented or published in more recent years.
  • Need a toolkit or staff development tool on assessment accommodations?
    www.cec.sped.org/bk/catalog2/assessment.html
    Making Assessment Accommodations: A Toolkit For Educators 2000 [and Videotape] is a product of the ASPIIRE and ILIAD IDEA Partnership Projects, formerly funded by OSEP. An introductory section provides an overview of the toolkit. A 15-minute videotape looks at commonly used assessment accommodations from the perspectives of practitioners, policymakers, administrators, and parents. The Practitioner's Guide section briefly describes the most commonly used accommodations in five areas: timing, scheduling, setting, presentation, and response. The Administrator's Guide section includes a discussion of implementation along with examples of schools that have made assessment accommodations for students with disabilities. A pamphlet to share with family members is also included in this section. The final section presents suggestions and ideas for using the toolkit in staff development sessions for small study groups. To order, call The Council for Exceptional Children, 1.888.232.7733, or e-mail service@cec.sped.org.
  • State policies: Assessment and accommodations.
    www.education.umn.edu/nceo/TopicAreas/Accommodations/StatesAccomm.htm
    Want to know what your state's policy is about including students with disabilities in standardized assessments? Take a look at the link above, courtesy of the National Center on Educational Outcomes (NCEO), which has been tracking and analyzing state policies on participation in assessments and accommodations for more than a decade now.
  • And then you include the scores of students with disabilities in the state's accountability system, right? No matter what they are?
    www.education.umn.edu/nceo/OnlinePubs/Technical33.htm
    States want to have good scores on their tests, just like any student does. If the students in the state do well on these large-scale tests, that means the state's education system is working. But what if the scores turn out lousy? No one wants to hear that bad news! Nonetheless, states have to tell us how students are doing (and, by extension, how the state's system is doing). But are they really including students with disabilities in the overall performance picture? This study, "Are we there yet? Accountability for the performance of students with disabilities," identifies and describes the accountability systems that states are using, and discusses the degree to which publicly available documents clearly articulate whether students with disabilities are included in accountability calculations.
  • Want more resources? Try NICHCY's TA&D Resource Library. www.nichcy.org/search.htm At our "Search for Info" page (the link above), put a check in the box labeled "Resource Library (TA&D Products)," enter the search term "Assessment" (or Accommodations" or "Alternate Assessment"), and you'll get a list of all the publications and products available on the subject that are available from the TA&D (Technical Assistance and Dissemination) network funded by the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) at the U.S. Department of Education.

Alternate Assessments

  • What we know and need to know about alternate assessment. http://journals.sped.org/ec/archive_articles/VOLUME70NUMBER1Fall2003_EC_Browder70-1.pdf This 2003 journal article appears in Exceptional Children, Vol. 70, No. 1, pp. 45-61. It reviews promises, practices, and provisos of using alternate assessments to measure progress of students with disabilities in statewide assessment programs.
  • Alternate assessment: Q & A.
    www.usu.edu/mprrc/infoserv/pubs.cfm#aa
    This document was created as a tool for state staff, local educators, and other stakeholders who have a vested interest in creating an alternative assessment process for a state and local district. Alternative assessment is defined, and examples are offered.
  • Here's a ton of info on alternate assessment---all in one place.
    http://education.umn.edu/nceo/TopicAreas/AlternateAssessments/alt_assess_topic.htm
    You'll notice how often this A-Z page takes you to the National Center on Educational Outcomes (NCEO)--that's because they're the experts! They offer a gratifying number of resources on alternate assessment, which is "designed to measure the performance of students who are unable to participate in general large-scale assessments used by districts and states." This NCEO special topic area includes, among other things, an Introduction (the link above), an FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions), and connection to resources on the subject.
  • What are your state's alternate assessment policies?
    http://education.umn.edu/nceo/TopicAreas/AlternateAssessments/StatesAltAssess.htm
    If you want to know what your state is up to, take a look at the link above, again courtesy of the National Center on Educational Outcomes (NCEO), which has been tracking and analyzing state policies on participation in assessments and accommodations for more than a decade now.
  • A standard setting method for alternate assessments for students with significant disabilities.
    www.education.umn.edu/NCEO/OnlinePubs/Synthesis47.html
    Exploration of the rationale and design of the alternate portfolio assessment.
  • Want more resources? Try NICHCY's TA&D Resource Library.
    www.nichcy.org/search.htm
    At our "Search for Info" page (the link above), put a check in the box labeled "Resource Library (TA&D Products)," enter the search term "Alternate Assessment" (make sure you put the phrase in quotation marks) and you'll get a list of all the publications and products available on the subject that are available from the TA&D (Technical Assistance and Dissemination) network funded by the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) at the U.S. Department of Education.

Disability Publishers

Academic Therapy Publications - www.academictherapy.com/
This Web site offers books for all professionals working with children who have special needs. In addition, this publisher offers High Noon Books, which are written for high interest/low level readers. That is, students who are reading below their age level, but prefer more age appropriate subject matter.

ADD Warehouse - www.addwarehouse.com
Developmental disorders, including attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder are this publisher’s specialty. Browse through the books by category—kids, adults, parents, and teachers. Don’t miss the videos. Some products are also available in Spanish.

Albert Whitman and Company - www.awhitmanco.com
This publisher specializes in children’s books and features stories for kids on asthma, Down syndrome, learning disabilities and more.

Allyn & Bacon/Longman - www.ablongman.com/
This publisher produces tons of materials on a variety of disability-related topics for teachers, teachers-in-training, and parents. Search by keyword to pinpoint what you are looking for.

Brookline Books - www.brooklinebooks.com
This publisher offers three categories of disability books: assistive technology, general disability, and self-advocacy. The materials are for teachers, families, and young adults with disabilities.

Butte Publications Resources - www.buttepublications.com/
At this publisher’s site, you’ll find educational materials for students who are deaf or hard of hearing, their parents, teachers, and other professionals in the field.

Canter and Associates - www.canter.net
Click on “Canter Store” when you get to this Web site, and you’ll find a wealth of information. Products are broken down into categories for parents, teachers, and administrators. Or, you can search by keyword.

Centering Corporation - www.centering.org
This organization specializes in publications about grief and overcoming loss.

Childswork/Childsplay - www.childswork.com
This publisher offers over 450 resources to address the social and emotional needs of children and adolescents. Their web site has areas dedicated to disorders, research issues, teachers, parents, and mental health professionals.

Compact Clinicals - www.compactclinicals.com
This publisher offers concise overviews on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, aggressive and defiant behavior, depression, obsessive compulsive disorder, and other conditions.

Corwin Press, Inc. - www.corwinpress.com
Educators, administrators, and counselors, this publisher has products for you! Check out the books and journals listed on the Web site. Request a free catalog.

Delmar Learning/Thomson Learning - www.earlychilded.delmar.com/
This Web site features early childhood education products. Browse through the categories of books to find books on assessment, inclusion, and much more.

Educators Publishing Service - www.epsbooks.com/#XYZ
At this site you will find books and workbooks for students from kindergarten through high school as well as students who are home-schooled. This publisher focuses on teacher-developed literacy products.

Free Spirit Publishing - www.freespirit.com
This publisher offers books and other learning materials on learning differences (or learning disabilities) for kids, teens, teachers, and parents. Browse by category to find what you are looking for.

Future Horizons - www.futurehorizons-autism.com
If you are looking for products on autism, PDD, or Asperger’s, this is the site to visit. They offer books, videos, and a magazine, as well as medical resources, and conference information.

Gallaudet University Press - http://gupress.gallaudet.edu
This site is a one-stop shop for books on deaf and hard of hearing topics, including American Sign Language, deaf culture, parenting, special education, and more.

GSI Publications - www.gsi-add.com
This site is chock-full of ADHD products for parents, teachers, children with ADHD, and their siblings. Some materials are also available in Spanish.

Guilford Press - www.guilford.com
Click on “ADHD Resources” to find lots of books and videos on Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. Also check the “Education” category for other disability-related resources. Some materials are also available in Spanish.

Heinle & Heinle/Thomson Learning - www.heinle.com
This publisher specializes in ESL and ELT (English as a Second Language, and English Language Teaching) materials. Teachers and students can find products tailored to them.

Jason & Nordic Publishers - www.jasonandnordic.com
This publisher offers an awesome series of children’s books about what it’s like to have a disability such as cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, or deafness. Some books are also available in an audio version.

John Wiley & Sons - www.wiley.com
Check out the “Special Education” category (within the “Education” section) to find over 20 different books for teachers on teaching special-needs kids.

L&A Publishing - www.lapublishing.com
This publisher offers tons of reader-friendly information on brain injury in children and adults. Check out the resources for survivors, parents, kids, siblings, teachers, advocates, and counselors.

LRP Publications - www.lrp.com
LRP offers lots of legal information regarding special education. On their site, you can sign up for free Special Ed e-news—short e-mail newsletters giving you significant case decisions, important developments in the special education community, and updates on LRP's new products. Also, visit their special education store to find resources on IDEA, inclusion and more.

Lawrence Erlbaum Associates - www.erlbaum.com
Education professionals will find over 50 resources of interest at this publisher’s site, when they search by “special education.” Topics covered include learning disabilities, multiculturalism, and educational placement.

Love Publishing - www.lovepublishing.com
Just click on “special education” at this publisher’s Web site to find a categorical list of special-needs resources, including behavior, early intervention, special education law, and much more.

Magination Press - www.maginationpress.com
This publisher features special books for children’s special concerns. Written for ages four through 18, these books range in topic from autism, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, to medical problems, and self-esteem. A great site for hard-to-find children books.

Master Teacher - www.masterteacher.com
This publisher has great special education resources for teachers, principals, administrators, and paraeducators (also called teacher aides).

Nolo Press - www.nolo.com
This publisher offers easy-to-read legal information. Search by “special education” to find the products that would be of interest to you.

Open Minds - www.openmindsinc.com
This publisher focuses on children’s literature that celebrates differences and models inclusion. Materials are available in series sets that can easily used in the classroom—fiction books, student journals, and parent and teacher guides.

Paul H. Brookes - www.brookespublishing.com
This publisher is a gold mine of special needs materials, useful particularly to professionals with some parent materials scattered throughout. They publish research-based resources in developmental and learning disabilities, early intervention, child development, language and literacy, special and inclusive education, community supports and services, mental health, and behavior.

Peachtree Publications - www.peachtree-online.com
Check out the children and young adult’s section of this publisher’s Web site. You’ll find great children’s books covering topics such as deafness, getting a prosthetic hand, and using a wheelchair.

Peytral Publications - www.peytral.com
This publisher has a great bunch of publications for parents, teachers, paraeducators and more on various disability and special education materials.

Prentice Hall/Pearson Education - http://vig.prenhall.com
Special educators-in-training will find tons of resources at this publisher’s site. Select “special education” under the Discipline Finder and you’ll get over 20 subcategories of special education topics, including behavior management, families in special education, special education law, and more.

Pro-Ed, Inc. - www.proedinc.com
Visit this site to find out about the resources this publisher provides on speech, language, and hearing, psychology and counseling, special education, early childhood intervention, and occupational and physical therapy.

Psy-Ed Corporation - www.exceptionalparent.com
Psy-Ed Corporation publishes Exceptional Parent, a magazine published primarily for parents of children with special needs.

Sage Publications - www.sagepub.com
This publisher offers a wide range of publications geared toward teachers and teachers-in-training. Try searching by “special education” or “disability” to find books suited to your interests.

Scholastic, Inc. - www.scholastic.com/index.asp
This site has numerous disability-related materials. Search by “disabilities” or “special needs” and you’ll find tons of books, articles, and other products.

Sensory Resources - www.sensoryresources.com/
Parents, teachers, and therapists will love the hard-to-find resources on sensory integration and sensory processing that are available through this site. Children with autism spectrum disorders often have sensory issues.

Sopris West - www.sopriswest.com
Education professionals and parents! This publisher specializes in practical products aimed at helping students with their behavior, social skills, and academics. You’ll find books, journals, curricula and more on a variety of topics, including behavior management, inclusion, reading, and social skills. Search the online catalog, or request a free publications catalog.

Special Kids - www.specialkids1.com
Special Kids produces educational videotapes and picture books aimed at children who have autism, Down syndrome, PDD, Asperger’s Syndrome, or learning disabilities. This site also has tons of links to other good resources.

Woodbine House - www.woodbinehouse.com/
You’ll find a real treasure chest of special needs products here! This publishers offers “The Special-Needs Collection”--sixty books on disabilities and related topics for parents, children, and professionals.

NASET Member Accomplishments

In this section, you, the NASET member, can write to us about yourself or someone you know, who has achieved or accomplished something you feel should be recognized by your peers. Send us your accomplishments.  We’d love to hear about them and let members know what you’ve done.

Controversial Issues

In the Special Educator, we will bring up a controversial issues that special education teachers face.  We need your ideas for the upcoming school year regarding what you see as a controversial issue facing special educators today

Useful Web Sites for Special Educators

Tutor for Kids

  • An overview of the law's SES provision, including eligibility criteria;
  • Charts outlining the roles of families, educators, states and school districts, policymakers, and providers in the SES process;
  • A state-by-state listing of SES providers;
  • Links to other online resources, such as organizations doing related work, news articles and research; and
  • A calendar of SES-focused events;
  • The SESQ Center was established in late 2003 through a grant to the American Institutes for Research from the Office of Innovation and Improvement at the U.S. Department of Education.

For complete details, visit:  www.tutorsforkids.org

The ABCs of Bullying: Addressing, Blocking, and Curbing School Aggression Online Tutorial (2004)-(Educational Course)

The Federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's Center for Substance Abuse Prevention has just completed a free online tutorial for all school personnel on school-based bullying. The tutorial, "The ABCs of Bullying: Addressing, Blocking, and Curbing School Aggression," offers CEU's to social workers, all counselors, health educators, and
contact hours to all school personnel.  For complete details, go to: http://pathwayscourses.samhsa.gov/courses.htm#bully

ADD/ADHD in the Workplace (2004)

This article discusses protection for people with ADD/ADHD under the Americans with Disabilities Act and general accommodations that have proven helpful for them.  For complete details, go to:
http://add.about.com/library/weekly/aa111202a.htm

Job Creation Can Make Employment Work

This brief guides employment staff through the job creation process, with emphasis on developing a position that will suit an individual's interests and requirements. In order for job development to succeed, disability/employment professionals need to meet the needs of job seekers and employers alike. Job creation is a way to restructure existing jobs or bring together a combination of tasks to suit both parties. Produced by the Institute for Community Inclusion.  For complete details, go to:
http://www.communityinclusion.org/publications/pub.php?page=newpubs#ib17

Online Training Conference: Abuse of Persons with Disabilities (2004)-(Educational Course)

The first online professional training conference on the abuse of children and adults with disabilities will be offered Thursday, September 9 through Wednesday, September 29. The conference consists of 22 one-hour Webinars (online seminars), plus an additional 10 hours of contact with the training faculty between September 9, 2004 and January 31, 2005. It's designed for all professionals and all workers in the fields of abuse/victimization and/or disabilities. Topics include prevention, identification, investigation, prosecution and treatment. Seminars will concern casework and care giving where people with disabilities are victims of child abuse, domestic violence, dependent adult abuse, and elder abuse. This training conference is funded through a grant from the Office for Victims of Crime, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice, and is presented by ARC Riverside California.  For complete details, visit: http://disability-abuse.com

SSA Office of Policy

The Office of Policy serves as the Social Security Administration's (SSA’s) focal point for policy analysis and research, evaluation, and statistics. Access this site to find statistical information and other policy-related information relative to the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and
Supplemental Security Income (SSI) programs. For complete details, go to: http://www.socialsecurity.gov/policy/

American Association of People with Disabilities Emerging Leader Awards (2004)-Adult Scholarship

The American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD), a national nonprofit cross-disability member organization, invites applications for the 2004 Paul G. Hearne/AAPD Leadership Awards program. Up to three people with disabilities who are emerging as leaders in their respective fields will be awarded $10,000 each through the program to help them continue their leadership progress and development. They also will have an opportunity to meet and network with national disability leaders at the AAPD Leadership Gala in Washington, D.C., in early 2005. U.S. residents with any type of disability and of any age are eligible to apply. Application deadline: September 10, 2004.  For complete details, visit: http://www.aapd-dc.org/awards/awards04/hearne_app04.html

School Admits Girl, Her Dog

A 7-year-old girl was finally allowed into Mount Vernon Elementary School yesterday with her service dog after her doctor attested she needed the animal.  In a case that angered advocates for the disabled, Rockcastle Schools Superintendent Larry Hammond had prevented Cheyenne Gilliam from going to class Wednesday and Thursday with her dog, saying he was concerned about safety and liability issues such as other students being allergic to the dog or afraid of it. Read more from Bill Estep from the South Central Kentucky Bureau at http://www.kentucky.com/mld/heraldleader/2004/08/07/news/9342638.htm

National Dispute Resolution Use and Effectiveness Study

The National Dispute Resolution Use and Effectiveness Study, co-authored by Drs. Judy and Howard Schrag, reviews previously published research, examines recently collected data, and makes important recommendations.  To review the study, click here: http://www.directionservice.org/cadre/effective.cfm

Increasing School Completion: Learning from Research-Based Practices that Work

This brief identifies and describes five research-based practices proven effective in increasing rates of school completion. The practices utilized random samples or comparison groups and had statistically significant results for the treatment group on the variable of enrollment status. http://www.ncset.org/publications/viewdesc.asp?id=1646

The National Dropout Prevention Center for Students with Disabilities Web Cast (Teleconference Transcript)

This transcript of an interactive Web cast sponsored by NCSET and the Great Lakes Area Regional Resource Center on July 27, 2004 includes information about critical factors influencing students' decisions to drop out of school and technical assistance available through the National Dropout Prevention Center for Students with Disabilities to reduce dropout. The transcript also includes information about Ohio's successful strategies to reduce the dropout rate among students with disabilities.  For complete details, visit: http://www.glarrc.org/webcast/ndpc.htm

Employability Skills Training and Implementation Program (2004)-(CD-ROM

The Employability Skills Training and Implementation Program (ES-TIP) is a software-based learning system that helps consumers with little to no work experience and/or academic skills build self-esteem, a work ethic, and workplace success. Originally developed by the Florida Department of Education, ES-TIP addresses the skills and knowledge necessary for an effective job search while promoting strategies and attitudes essential for job retention and career advancement.  For complete details, visit: http://www.vri.org/es_tip/index.html

Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities of Youth Service Practitioners: The Centerpiece of a Successful Workforce Development System (2004)-(Report

This paper, published by the National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability, identifies the knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) that youth service practitioners (frontline staff) need to serve all youth, and additional KSAs needed to serve youth with disabilities. Youth receive workforce development services in a wide range of settings; to them, youth service practitioners are often the ³face² of the workforce development system and play an important role in connecting them to workforce preparation opportunities and support. Available in PDF (29 pages).  For complete details, visit: http://www.ncwd-youth.info/assets/background/ksa.pdf

The National Research Center on Learning Disabilities Responsiveness-to-Intervention Symposium (December 2003)-(Web Site)

In December 2003, the National Research Center on Learning Disabilities (NRCLD) conducted a symposium examining issues related to Responsiveness-to-Intervention models of learning disability assessment and decision making. Materials presented at the symposium, including a biographical sketch of each speaker, PDF versions of each speaker¹s paper, the speakers¹ PowerPoint presentations, a brief video highlight from each presentation, and transcripts from some of the other symposium activities are now available on NRCLD¹s Web site.  For complete details, visit: http://www.nrcld.org/html/news/symposium2003.html

The National Survey of Community Rehabilitation Providers (September 2004)-(Brief)

Two new Research to Practice briefs examine the services people with developmental disabilities receive from community rehabilitation providers (CRPs). Despite recent emphasis on work in the disability field, people with developmental disabilities were found to be predominantly in sheltered employment or non-work services. Published by the Institute for Community Inclusion. Available in PDF (6 pages).  For complete details, visit: http://www.communityinclusion.org/publications/pdf/rp39.pdf

Access Center Webinar: Mathematics Instruction for Students with Special Needs- September 7, 2004 (2:00-3:00 pm (EDT: Web-based Event)

The Access Center¹s Webinars (Web + Seminar = Webinar) are interactive online events that include a PowerPoint presentation, an opportunity to listen to the presentation over the phone, and an ability to ask questions. During this Webinar, Dr. David Allsopp from the University of South Florida¹s Department of Special Education will present on effective mathematics instruction for students with special needs. He will also share resources and tools that educators can use to ensure that math content is consistent with the learning needs of diverse students. http://www.k8accesscenter.org/online_community_area/Webinar.asp

Developmental Disabilities Leadership Forum

The Developmental Disabilities Leadership Forum offers courses, discussion groups, articles, and conferences/events to anyone interested in developmental disabilities. They also offer an online journal; the focus of the spring 2004 issue is youth with developmental disabilities and the
juvenile justice system.  For complete details, visit: http://www.ddleadership.org/

Disability Studies for Teachers

This Web site, developed by the Center for Human Policy at Syracuse University, contains lesson plans and materials designed to help teachers integrate disability studies into social studies, history, literature, and related subjects in grades 6-12. The plans and materials also can be adapted for use in postsecondary education. Lesson plans and essays on "disability studies" examine disability as a social, cultural, and political phenomenon. Among the topics: a history of deaf education, efforts to reform poorhouses in the 1840s and 1850s, P.T. Barnum and "freak shows," conscientious objectors during World War II who exposed horrific conditions at state institutions, and an introduction to disability studies.  For complete details, visit:
http://www.disabilitystudiesforteachers.org/

Upcoming Conferences and Events for

September and October, 2004

For more details on these (and all conferences over the next year), go to the Conferences Navigation site on the NASET web site (www.naset.org

  • National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing Conference-September 9, 2004 to September 10, 2004
  • Council for Opportunity in Education Annual Conference (23rd): "Reaching for New Levels of Effectiveness"-September 12, 2004 to September 15, 2004
  • Children's Network Annual Conference (18th): "Connecting the Pieces: Family, Violence, Substance Abuse, and Children At-Risk"-September 30, 2004
  • Selective Mutism Group--Child Anxiety Network Conference-October 2, 2004 to October 3, 2004
  • New Hampshire Branch of the International Dyslexia Association Conference: "Brain Imaging of Reading and Reading Disabilities-October 2, 2004
  • International Reading Association Plains Regional Conference (31st)-October 6, 2004 to October 9, 2004
  • Council for Learning Disabilities International Conference (26th)-October 7, 2004 to October 9, 2004
  • ProLiteracy Worldwide Annual Conference: "The Many Faces of Literacy"-October 7, 2004 to October 9, 2004
  • American Printing House for the Blind Annual Meeting-October 14 - 17, 2004
  • Association of Teacher Educators National Academy: "Teacher as Researcher: School and University Collaborations"-October 15, 2004 to October 16, 2004
  • Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development Conference on Teaching and Learning: "What Works in Schools: Sustaining Student Success"-October 15, 2004 to October 17, 2004
  • U.S. Department of Education Annual National Meeting on Alcohol, Other Drug, and Violence Prevention in Higher Education (18th)-October 16, 2004
  • Council for Exceptional Children/The Council for Educational Diagnostic Services Annual Topical Conference-October 21, 2004
  • Michigan Association of Learning Disabilities Educators Fall Conference (31st): "Annual Yearly Program: Measuring Our Successes"-October 21, 2004 to October 23, 2004
  • Council for Exceptional Children/The Council for Educational Diagnostic Services Annual Topical Conference-October 21, 2004 to October 23, 2004
  • National Association of State Directors of Special Education Annual Conference (67th)-October 24, 2004 to October 26, 2004
  • National Association for Multicultural Education Annual International Conference (14th)-October 27, 2004 to October 31, 2004
  • West Tennessee Restructuring for Inclusive School Environments Project Annual Beyond Access Inclusion Conference (8th): "Equity and Excellence: One Size Does Not Fit All"-October 28, 2004
  • National Dropout Prevention Center/Network Annual National Conference (16th): "A Student With a Dream is a Student With a Future"-October 31, 2004 to November 3, 2004

Parents Page

Back-to-school Resources for Parents, Students, and PTAs

To make getting ready for school easier for parents, students, and PTA leaders, the National PTA (Parent-Teacher Association) has compiled resources and information in an expanded Web site. Parents can find articles on helping with homework, promoting good test-taking skills, keeping kids healthy, enhancing parent-teacher communication, and much more. PTA leaders planning back-to-school events will find tips, timelines, fliers, posters, and membership materials to get the 2004-2005 school year off to a great start. For complete details, visit: http://www.pta.org/parentinvolvement/bts/index.asp

THE BEATITUDES-For Friends of Exceptional Children

Blessed are you who take time to listen to difficult speech:
For you help us to know that if we persevere,
We can be understood.
Blessed are you who walk with us in public places,
And ignore the stares of strangers,
For in your companionship,
We find havens of peace.
Blessed are you who never bid us to "hurry up",
And more blessed are you
Who do not snatch tasks from our hands to do them for us,
For often we need time rather than help.
Blessed are you who stand beside us
As we enter new and untried ventures,
For our failures will be outweighed
By the times we surprise ourselves and you.
Blessed are you who ask for our help,
For our greatest need is to be needed.
Blessed are you when you assure us,
That the one thing that makes us individuals
Is not in our peculiar muscles,
Nor in our wounded nervous systems,
Nor in our difficulties in learning,
Nor any exterior difference.
But is in our inner, personal, individual self
Which no affirmity can diminish or erase.
Author Unknown
Compliments of Motivating Moments LLC
http://www.motivateus.com

September 7 Marks National AD/HD Awareness Day

Tuesday, September 7, will mark the inaugural AD/HD Awareness Day, highlighting the significant impact of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder on millions of American children, families and adults. In a resolution (S.370), introduced by Senator Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.) and co-sponsored by Senator Richard Durbin (D-Ill.), the U.S. Senate recognized AD/HD as a major public health concern and encouraged the federal government to raise public awareness about AD/HD and to improve access to mental health services for children and adults with the illness.  http://www.add.org/news/resolution.html

Through The Eyes of a Child with A.D.D.

Please tell me you love me,
for I need to be accepted in your eyes.
Please let me know when I have done well,
for I need to know that sometimes I am like other children.
Please share some of your thoughts with me,
for my intelligence is not impaired.
Please learn all you can about my problem.
I need understanding as well as discipline.
Please bother to correct me and keep me in line as much as necessary.
I cannot steer myself.
Give me your patience, because, although it takes me longer,
I need to succeed just like all the other children.
Please make time in your day for me.
I need to feel that attention and affection are things you want to give.
I will not go away if you pretend I am not there.
Remember that I am a complex person with many traits that are right and fine.
Please help me to see those things in myself. You are my mirror.
Please do not abuse me; for, although I need a firmer hand than most,
I feel lost and alone when I see rejection in your eyes.
I have no motive, and all I can do is say,
"I am sorry" over and over again.
Please remember that I love you,
for you stand beside me day after day in this confusing and frightening world.
You are the reason I am not alone.
--- Author Unknown
Compliments of Motivating Moments LLC
http://www.motivateus.com

The Healthy Student -- A Parent's Guide to Preparing Teens for the College Years (2004)-(Brochure)

While this brochure is not explicitly designed for teens with disabilities or chronic health conditions, it identifies and briefly addresses many of the issues that concern youth with special health care needs who plan to attend college, including insurance, medical records, prescriptions, confidentiality, and student health services. Published by the Adolescent Medicine Web site. Available in PDF format (8 pages).  For complete details, visit: http://www.adolescenthealth.org/html/The_Healthy_Student.pdf

Acknowledgements

  • The National Center on Secondary Education and Transition E-News, August and September, 2004, which can be found at http://www.ncset.org/enews/."
  • The U.S. Department of Education, The Achiever, [June1, 2004 through September 1, 2004].
  • The National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities
  • The National Institute of Mental Health

The National Association of Special Education Teachers (NASET) thanks all of the above for the information provided for this month’s Special Educator E-Journal.

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