Week in Review - May 12, 2017

NASET

WEEK IN REVIEW

National Association of Special Education Teachers

May 12, 2017                                              Vol 13 Issue # 19





Dear NASET News,

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW.  Here, we provide you with the latest publications from NASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW at news@naset.org. Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,

NASET News Team

NEW THIS WEEK ON NASET

NASET's Parent Teacher Conference Handout Issue #138

Acronyms in Special Education

Introduction
To most parents', terminology and acronyms are confusing and can create uncertainty, fear and confusion. This PTCH provides parents with a vast list of acronyms in special education. Read More

For People with Down Syndrome, Varying Test Results Can Make it Harder to Get the Right Vision Prescription

Even objective, automated vision testing -- using a device called an autorefractor -- gives variable results in patients with Down syndrome, reports a study in the May issue of Optometry and Vision Science, the official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. Variation in the results of autorefractor testing is nearly three times greater in people with Down syndrome than in a group of comparison patients, according to the new research by Jason D. Marsack, PhD, FAAO, and colleagues of University of Houston College of Optometry. That variability raises concern that some people with Down syndrome might not receive the best possible prescription to correct their vision. Read More

Surprise Communication Found Between Brain Regions Involved in Infant Motor Control


Day and night, it's processing signals from all over the body, from recognizing the wriggles of the child's own fingers and toes to the sound of mommy's or daddy's voice. Though much of how the infant brain works and develops remains a mystery, University of Iowa researchers say they have uncovered a new mode of communication between two relatively distant regions. And, it turns out that sleep is key to this communication. When two areas of the brain communicate, their rhythms will often synchronize. One well-known brain rhythm, the theta rhythm, is most closely associated with the hippocampus, a region in the forebrain important for consolidating memories and navigation, among other functions. In experiments with infant rats, the researchers showed for the first time that the hippocampus oscillates in lockstep with the red nucleus, a brain-stem structure that plays a major role in motor control. Importantly, the hippocampus and red nucleus synchronize almost exclusively during REM (active) sleep. Read More

Prevalence of Visual Impairment Among Preschool Children Projected to Increase

The number of preschool children in the U.S. with visual impairment is projected to increase by more than 25 percent in the coming decades, with the majority of visual impairment resulting from simple uncorrected refractive error, according to a study published by JAMA Ophthalmology. Visual impairment (VI) in early childhood can significantly impair development of visual, motor, and cognitive function. There has been a lack of accurate data characterizing the prevalence of VI in the U.S. preschool population. Rohit Varma, M.D., M.P.H., of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, and colleagues examined prevalence data from two major population-based studies to determine demographic and geographic variations in VI in children ages 3 to 5 years in the United States in 2015 and estimated projected prevalence through 2060. Read More

Reading with Children Starting in Infancy Gives Lasting Literacy Boost

New research at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting shows that reading books with a child beginning in early infancy can boost vocabulary and reading skills four years later, before the start of elementary school. The abstract, "Early Reading Matters: Long-term Impacts of Shared Bookreading with Infants and Toddlers on Language and Literacy Outcomes," will be presented on Monday, May 8, at the Moscone West Convention Center in San Francisco. "These findings are exciting because they suggest that reading to young children, beginning even in early infancy, has a lasting effect on language, literacy and early reading skills," said Carolyn Cates, PhD, lead author and research assistant professor in the department of pediatrics at New York University (NYU) School of Medicine. "What they're learning when you read with them as infants," she said, "still has an effect four years later when they're about to begin elementary school." Read More

Handheld Screen Time Linked with Speech Delays in Young Children

As the number of smart phones, tablets, electronic games and other handheld screens in U.S. homes continues to grow, some children begin using these devices before beginning to talk. New research being presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting suggests these children may be at higher risk for speech delays. Researchers will present the abstract, "Is handheld screen time use associated with language delay in infants?" on Saturday, May 6 at the Moscone West Convention Center in San Francisco. The study included 894 children between ages 6 months and 2 years participating in TARGet Kids!, a practice-based research network in Toronto between 2011 and 2015.By their 18-month check-ups, 20 percent of the children had daily average handheld device use of 28 minutes, according to their parents. Based on a screening tool for language delay, researchers found that the more handheld screen time a child's parent reported, the more likely the child was to have delays in expressive speech. Read More

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

AASEP Logo
Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee. AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children. Read More

Human Inner Ear Organs Grown: Could Lead to New Therapies for Hearing, Balance Impairments

Researchers at Indiana University School of Medicine have successfully developed a method to grow inner ear tissue from human stem cells -- a finding that could lead to new platforms to model disease and new therapies for the treatment of hearing and balance disorders. "The inner ear is only one of few organs with which biopsy is not performed and because of this, human inner ear tissues are scarce for research purposes," said Eri Hashino, PhD, Ruth C. Holton Professor of Otolaryngology at IU School of Medicine. "Dish-grown human inner ear tissues offer unprecedented opportunities to develop and test new therapies for various inner ear disorders." Read More

Repetition a Key Factor in Language Learning

Lilli Kimppa from the University of Helsinki studied language acquisition in the brain. Even short repetitive exposure to novel words induced a rapid neural response increase that is suggested to manifest memory-trace formation. Rapid learning of new words is crucial for language acquisition, and frequent exposure to spoken words enables vocabulary development. In her doctoral dissertation, Lilli Kimppa studied neural response dynamics to new words over brief exposure. She measured the neural activation of Finnish-speaking volunteers with electroencephalography (EEG) during auditory tasks in which existing Finnish words, and non-words with Finnish and non-native phonology, were repeated. "Unlike to existing words, new words showed a neural response enhancement between the early and late stages of exposure on the left frontal and temporal cortices, which was interpreted as the build-up of neural memory circuits. Read More

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Congratulations to: Melody Owens, Prahbhjot Malhi, Olumide Akerele, Patsy Ray, Laura Malena, Pamela Downing-Hosten and Jessica Gaspar who all knew the answer to last week's trivia question.

QUESTION:
A favorite childhood pastime also may be teaching kids how to get along. The measured, synchronous movement of children doing this activity can encourage preschoolers to cooperate on subsequent activities, University of Washington researchers have found. A study by the UW's Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences (I-LABS) shows the potential of this synchronized movement in helping young children develop collaborative skills.  What is the activity?

ANSWER:  The activity is swinging on playground swing sets.
This week's question:
According to the latest research published in the Journal of the Endocrine Society, children with obesity face four times the risk of developing what medical condition compared to children with a body mass index (BMI) in the normal range?

If you know the answer, email us at contactus@naset.org by May 15, 2017.  We will acknowledge your correct answer in the next edition of the Week in Review
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Modest Increases in Kids' Physical Activity Could Avert Billions in Medical Costs

Increasing the percentage of elementary school children in the United States who participate in 25 minutes of physical activity three times a week from 32 percent to 50 percent would avoid $21.9 billion in medical costs and lost wages over the course of their lifetimes, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. The findings, published May 1 in Health Affairs, suggest that just a small increase in the frequency of exercise among children ages eight through 11 would also result in 340,000 fewer obese and overweight youth, a reduction of more than four percent. If all current eight- through 11-year-olds in the United States exercised 25 minutes a day, three times a week, the researchers suggest that $62.3 billion in medical costs and lost wages over the course of their lifetimes could be avoided and in 1.2 million fewer youths would be overweight or obese. Read More

SPECIAL EDUCATION LAW SYMPOSIUM (JUNE 18-JUNE 23, 2017)

Lehigh University's intensive one-week institute provides a practical analysis of legislation, regulations, and court decisions relating to the education of students with disabilities. The symposium is designed for special education coordinators and teachers, principals, psychologists, parent advocates, charter school personnel, attorneys (on both sides), hearing officers, state education agency personnel, and other individuals interested in a thorough exploration of the special education legal landscape.
The Symposium is offered with the options of graduate or continuing education credit for week-long participants. Shorter, including daily, registrations are also available. For full information, go to http://go.lehigh.edu/spedlaw. For any questions, email or call Shannon Weber or Donna Johnson at specialedlaw@lehigh.edu or (610) 758-5557.

Student Creates First Synthetic Retina for Individuals with Visual Impairments

A synthetic, soft tissue retina developed by an Oxford University student could offer fresh hope to people with visual impairments. Until now, all artificial retinal research has used only rigid, hard materials. The new research, by Vanessa Restrepo-Schild, a 24 year old Dphil student and researcher at the Oxford University, Department of Chemistry, is the first to successfully use biological, synthetic tissues, developed in a laboratory environment. The study could revolutionise the bionic implant industry and the development of new, less invasive technologies that more closely resemble human body tissues, helping to treat degenerative eye conditions such as retinitis pigmentosa. Read More

New Roadmap Provides Blueprint to Tackle Burden of Asthma

A new roadmap has been published identifying key priority areas that need to be addressed to tackle the burden of asthma. According to the document from the European Asthma Research and Innovation Partnership (EARIP), a unified approach to research, development and innovation is urgently needed to address the challenge of asthma in Europe, improve mortality and reduce morbidity. Asthma is a chronic disease characterized by recurrent attacks of breathlessness and wheezing which affects around 10% of people in Europe of all ages. It can result in severe asthma attacks, hospital visits and even deaths. The causes are not completely understood and there is no cure. Read More

Artificial Pancreas Benefits Young Children, Trial Shows

A pilot study among young children with Type 1 diabetes found that a University of Virginia-
developed artificial pancreas helped study participants better control their condition. The goal of the artificial pancreas is to automatically monitor and regulate blood-sugar levels, eliminating the need for people with Type 1 diabetes to stick their fingers to check their blood sugar frequently and manually inject insulin. Developed at the UVA Center for Diabetes Technology, the platform features a reconfigured smartphone running advanced algorithms that is wirelessly linked to a blood-sugar monitor and an insulin pump worn by the patient, as well as to a remote-monitoring site. Read More

A Little Support from their Online Friends Calms Test-Anxious Students

Reading supportive comments, "likes" and private messages from social media friends prior to taking a test may help college students who have high levels of test-anxiety significantly reduce their nervousness and improve their scores, a new study suggests. Undergraduate students with high levels of test anxiety who sought social support from their online friends and read the messages prior to a simulated exam reduced their anxiety levels by 21 percent, researchers at the University of Illinois found. These students, and peers who performed a seven-minute expressive-writing exercise, were able to perform as well on a set of computer programming exercises as students who had low levels of test anxiety, said lead author Robert Deloatch, a graduate student in computer science at the university. Read More

Artificial Intelligence Shows Potential to Fight Blindness

Researchers from the Byers Eye Institute at Stanford University have found a way to use artificial intelligence to fight a complication of diabetes that affects the eyes. This advance has the potential to reduce the worldwide rate of vision loss due to diabetes. In a study published online in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the researchers describe how they used deep-learning methods to create an automated algorithm to detect diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a condition that damages the blood vessels at the back of the eye, potentially causing blindness. "What we showed is that an artificial intelligence-based grading algorithm can be used to identify, with high reliability, which patients should be referred to an ophthalmologist for further evaluation and treatment," said Theodore Leng, M.D., lead author. Read More

Cystic Fibrosis: Interactions Between Bacteria that Infect Lungs Uncovered

Substances produced by a harmful bacterium in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients may enhance the growth of other bacteria that, in turn, inhibit the harmful bacterium's biofilm, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens. Most people with cystic fibrosis develop lung infections that involve multiple species of microbes. These microbes adhere to each other and to the walls of the airway in structures known as biofilms. A biofilm bacterium known as Pseudomonas aeruginosa can cause devastating symptoms, but recent studies suggest that other bacteria known as streptococci might inhibit P. aeruginosa and improve lung function. Read More

Strong Parent Connections Enhance Children's Ability to Develop Healthy Response to Stress

Children in low-income families have an increased chance of thriving when their caregiver relationships include certain positive characteristics, according to new research from the National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. Using data from more than 2,200 low-income families surveyed as part of the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, NCCP researchers found that school-age children who reported high levels of parent involvement and supervision were more likely to report behaviors associated with positive emotional development and social growth. Read More

Gender Differences in Depression Appear at Age 12

An analysis just published online has broken new ground by finding gender differences in both symptoms and diagnoses of depression appearing at age 12. The analysis, based on existing studies that looked at more than 3.5 million people in more than 90 countries, confirmed that depression affects far more females than males. The study, published by the journal Psychological Bulletin, should convince doubters that depression largely, but not entirely, affects females, says co-author Janet Hyde, a professor of psychology and gender and women's studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Read More

Maternal Marijuana Use Linked to Low Birth Weight

In a new study, researchers in London, Ontario found that women who used marijuana while pregnant were almost three times more likely to have an infant with low birth weight than women who did not use marijuana. The study analyzed data from perinatal and neonatal databases at London Health Sciences Centre (LHSC) and is the first large-scale study in Canada to show this association between marijuana use among pregnant women and low birth weight infants. It was conducted by researchers at Lawson Health Research Institute, Western University and Brescia University College. Maternal amphetamine use, chronic hypertension and smoking were identified as other top risk factors for low birth weight. The study also examined predictors of preterm birth, which included previously diagnosed diabetes, maternal narcotic use and insulin-controlled gestational diabetes. Read More
jobs

LATEST JOB LISTINGS POSTED ON NASET


* Special Education Teacher - Valhalla & Bronx - Easterseals Bronx Child Development Center is seeking a Special Education Teacher for their preschool program for children with special needs for summer session beginning July 3 - August 11, 2017. To learn more -Click here
* Classroom Teacher - Special Education - Come for a job, find a family. Where else but Benedictine? Be inspired to come to work every day knowing that you are making a difference in someone else's life. Our teams of professionals work together to improve the quality of life of adults and children with developmental disabilities by helping them achieve their greatest potential in all aspects of life; school, residential, and vocational. To learn more - Click here
* Special Education Teacher - We are currently seeking Special Education Teachers for our middle schools and high schools. The Special Education Teacher is responsible for ensuring that all special education students receive comprehensive, compassionate and equitable services in order to achieve breakthrough academic achievement and character development.  To learn more - Click here
* Arizona Special Education Teacher - STARS seeks Special Education Teachers for the 2017-2018 school year. and is able to offer you an unbeatable support system and resources. Stars places Special Education Teachers throughout the Phoenix, Tucson and the surrounding area public schools. To learn more - Click here
* Classroom Teacher - The Wardlaw School for children with dyslexia is currently seeking an outstanding professional to serve as classroom teacher in our multi-disciplinary, collaborative educational environment. To learn more - Click here
* Special Education Teachers - Will Relocate You! - Explore your passion for education and being a part of a culture where students learn; personal empowerment, self-determination and resiliency through a mind-frame of personal accountability. To learn more -Click Here
* Special Education Teacher - The Graham Academy is a private academic K-12 school that has immediate openings for special education positions within both their autism support and emotional support K-12 classrooms. To learn more - Click here
* Teaching in New York City - New York City public schools offer competitive starting salaries ranging from $54,000 to $81,694, based on prior teaching experience as well as your undergraduate and graduate education. To learn more - Click Here

* Special Education Specialist - The primary responsibility of the Special Education Specialist is to provide instruction and other related services to Special Education students. The Special Education Specialist will also facilitate diagnostic assessment including administration, scoring and interpretation. To learn more - Click here

If you are an Employer looking for excellent special education staff - Click here for more information

Food For Thought..........

Take chances, make mistakes. That's how you grow. Pain nourishes your courage. You have to fail in order to practice being brave.

Mary Tyler Moore

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