Week in Review - April 28, 2017

NASET

WEEK IN REVIEW

National Association of Special Education Teachers

April 28, 2017                                              Vol 13 Issue # 17



Dear NASET News,

Welcome to NASET'sWEEK in REVIEW.  Here, we provide you with the latest publications from NASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW at news@naset.org. Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,

NASET News Team

NEW THIS WEEK ON NASET

HOW TO SERIES- Issue #41


How to Determine Benchmarks or Short-Term Objectives
In the past, benchmarks or short-term objectives were required elements in every child's IEP. No longer, however. Now, benchmarks or short-term objectives are required only for children with disabilities who take alternate assessments aligned to alternate achievement standards. Read More

HOW TO SERIES- Issue #41


How to Determine Resources Especially for Child Care Providers and Preschools
It's a wonderful thing, to care for children, help them grow and change and learn, and keep them safe on their way. For those of you who help families and children every day by providing child care to the young ones or working in preschools, the rest of us say a profound "thank you." What a job you do! And with our finest treasures, too-our children.

Read More

 

Rates of New Diagnosed Cases of Type 1 and 2 Diabetes on the Rise Among Children, Teens

Rates of new diagnosed cases of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are increasing among youth in the United States, according to a report, Incidence Trends of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes among Youths, 2002-2012, published in the New England Journal of Medicine. In the United States, 29.1 million people are living with diagnosed or undiagnosed diabetes, and about 208,000 people younger than 20 years are living with diagnosed diabetes. This study is the first ever to estimate trends in new diagnosed cases of type 1 and type 2 diabetes in youth (those under the age of 20), from the five major racial/ethnic groups in the U.S.: non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, Hispanics, Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders, and Native Americans. However, the Native American youth who participated in the SEARCH study are not representative of all Native American youth in the United States. Thus, these rates cannot be generalized to all Native American youth nationwide. Read More

Low-Income Children Missing Out on Language Learning Both at Home and at School

Children from poor neighborhoods are less likely to have complex language building opportunities both in home and at school, putting them at a disadvantage in their kindergarten year, finds a new study led by NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. The findings, published in the Journal of Educational Psychology, suggest that language learning should involve both families and teachers in order to overcome these early disadvantages and ensure learning opportunities for vulnerable students. "Children may go from a home with limited physical and psychological resources for learning and language to a school with similar constraints, resulting in a double dose of disadvantage," said Susan B. Neuman, professor of childhood and literacy education at NYU Steinhardt and the study's lead author. "Our study suggests that neighborhoods matter and can have a powerful influence on nurturing success or failure." Read More

ADHD Drug Shows Promise for Treating Dyslexia

Researchers find that attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder drug atomoxetine could benefit children with dyslexia. Interventions to improve dyslexia in older children and adolescents have relatively low success rates. However, recent evidence has indicated that drugs used to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), such as atomoxetine, might be beneficial. In a study, 209 children (aged 10-16 years) with dyslexia only, 124 children with ADHD and dyslexia (ADHD+D) and 27 children with ADHD only were randomly assigned to receive atomoxetine or placebo daily for 16 weeks. Read More

Preliminary Study Suggests Possible New Treatment for MS

A small, preliminary study may show promise of a new type of treatment for progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). Results from the first six people enrolled in the phase 1 study, a study designed to enroll 10 people, are being presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 69th Annual Meeting in Boston, April 22 to 28, 2017. Phase 1 studies are designed to evaluate the safety of a treatment and identify side effects, using a small number of participants. While it was not the goal of this study to measure how effective the treatment was, symptoms improved for three of the six participants. "While these results are very preliminary and much more research is needed, we are excited there were no serious side effects," said study author Michael Pender, MD, PhD, of The University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia. Read More

Phonics Works: Sounding Out Words is Best Way to Teach Reading, Study Suggests

Research published today in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General has shown that learning to read by sounding out words (a teaching method known as phonics) has a dramatic impact on the accuracy of reading aloud and comprehension. There has been intense debate concerning how children should be taught to read. Researchers from Royal Holloway, University of London and the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit tested whether learning to read by sounding out words is more effective than focusing on whole-word meanings. In order to assess the effectiveness of using phonics the researchers trained adults to read in a new language, printed in unfamiliar symbols, and then measured their learning with reading tests and brain scans. Read More

Best Way to Diagnose Head Injuries in Children and Minimize CT Scans

Researchers hope to reduce unnecessary CT scans and radiation exposure in children with head injuries, following the results from a large-scale, multicentre validation study to assess the diagnostic accuracy of three clinical decision rules used by emergency doctors. Head injuries are one of the most common reasons children are taken to emergency departments. To rule out a serious brain injury, a percentage of these children require a CT scan and while this process is obvious for serious head injuries, it's more challenging to determine whether CT scans are necessary for children with milder injuries. Read More

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

AASEP Logo
Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee. AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.Read More

More than Recess: How Playing on the Swings Helps Kids Learn to Cooperate

A favorite childhood pastime -- swinging on the playground swing set -- also may be teaching kids how to get along. The measured, synchronous movement of children on the swings can encourage preschoolers to cooperate on subsequent activities, University of Washington researchers have found. A study by the UW's Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences (I-LABS) shows the potential of synchronized movement in helping young children develop collaborative skills. The study is published online in the Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. "Synchrony enhances cooperation, because your attention is directed at engaging with another person, at the same time," explained Tal-Chen Rabinowitch, a postdoctoral researcher at I-LABS. "We think that being 'in time' together enhances social interaction in positive ways." Read More

Cannabis-Based Medicine May Cut Seizures in Half for Those with Tough-to-Treat Epilepsy

Taking cannabidiol may cut seizures in half for some children and adults with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), a severe form of epilepsy, according to new information released today from a large scale controlled clinical study that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 69th Annual Meeting in Boston, April 22 to 28, 2017. Cannabidiol is a molecule from the cannabis plant that does not have the psychoactive properties that create a "high." Nearly 40 percent of people with LGS, which starts in childhood, had at least a 50 percent reduction in drop seizures when taking a liquid form of cannabidiol compared to 15 percent taking a placebo. Read More

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Congratulations to: Laura Malena, Jennifer Western-Burrough, Melody Owens, Jennifer Klump, Olumide Akerele, Denise Keeling, Laura Lee, Jessica Gaspar, Sharon Johnson-Hiltz, Patsy Ray, Amber Duncan and Prahbhjot Malhi who all knew the answer to last week's trivia question.

QUESTION:
According to recent research from  the University of Cambridge, school children who receive this from a teacher are significantly more likely to continue their education beyond the age of 16 than those who do not.  And the influence of it appears to be much greater on students whose own parents never progressed past compulsory education -- an important indicator of a less advantaged background. What is it?

ANSWER:  Teacher Encouragement

THE TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK WILL RETURN ON 5/5/17

Antidepressant Use in Early Pregnancy Does Not Increase Autism, ADHD Risk in Kids

A study led by Indiana University suggests that mothers' use of antidepressants during early pregnancy does not increase the risk of their children developing autism or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, conditions previously associated with these medications. The research, reported today in the Journal of the American Medical Association, found significant evidence for only a slight increase in risk for premature birth in the infants of mothers who used antidepressants during the first trimester of pregnancy. After controlling for multiple other risk factors, the researchers did not find any increased risk of autism, ADHD or reduced fetal growth among exposed offspring. The risk for premature birth was about 1.3 times higher for exposed offspring compared to unexposed offspring. Read More

SPECIAL EDUCATION LAW SYMPOSIUM (JUNE 18-JUNE 23, 2017)

Lehigh University's intensive one-week institute provides a practical analysis of legislation, regulations, and court decisions relating to the education of students with disabilities. The symposium is designed for special education coordinators and teachers, principals, psychologists, parent advocates, charter school personnel, attorneys (on both sides), hearing officers, state education agency personnel, and other individuals interested in a thorough exploration of the special education legal landscape.
The Symposium is offered with the options of graduate or continuing education credit for week-long participants. Shorter, including daily, registrations are also available. For full information, go to http://go.lehigh.edu/spedlaw. For any questions, email or call Shannon Weber or Donna Johnson at specialedlaw@lehigh.edu or (610) 758-5557.

Imbalances in Neural Pathways May Contribute to Repetitive Behaviors in Autism

Genetic studies have linked a number of risk genes to autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Although the complex genetics underlying ASD likely involve interactions between many genes, some risk genes are singular drivers of autism-like behaviors in rodent models, particularly genes that guide synaptic development and function. One such ASD-associated gene encodes SHANK3, a scaffolding protein that organizes neurotransmitter receptors and their intracellular effectors in neuronal synapses. SHANK3-deficient display repetitive grooming behavior as well as social interaction deficits and are considered to be an experimental model for autism. Read More

Parents Struggle with Choosing Allergy Medicine for their Children

Tulips, songbirds and itchy little eyes -- all are sure signs of spring. As allergy season kicks into high gear, many parents are likely searching for over-the-counter medications to help relieve children of symptoms like sneezing, coughing and congestion. But dosing, labeling and a seemingly endless range of allergy medication options can make picking the right medicine a complicated task for some parents, suggests today's report from the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health at the University of Michigan. "Parents often face an overwhelming selection of allergy medicine without clear guidelines on how to choose the right one for their child," says poll co-director and Mott pediatrician Gary Freed, M.D., M.P.H. Read More

ATV-Related Injuries in Children Remain Large Public Health Problem

All-terrain vehicle-related injuries remain a large public health problem in this country, with children more adversely affected than adults. According to researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, the major risk factors for young riders also are entirely preventable. "The injuries children sustain from ATV-related accidents are frequently more severe than injuries received from motor vehicle crashes," said Thomas Pranikoff, M.D., professor of pediatric surgical sciences at Wake Forest Baptist and lead author of the study published in the March online issue of the Journal of Emergency Medicine. Read More

Study Finds Children with ADHD Have Questions for Their Doctor but Don't Ask Them

Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder want to ask their physicians about their condition and medications but often don't, according to researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The study could help doctors and parents leverage this interest to help children better manage their ADHD. "We have found that there has been very little research into how providers, parents and youth communicate about ADHD and ADHD medications," said Betsy Sleath, the lead author of the study and the George H. Cocolas Distinguished Professor at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. "What we do know is that kids often aren't part of the conversation when their parents and doctors are talking ADHD. We wanted to know how the kids felt about that." Read More

Nevada Bill Seeks Cameras in Special Ed Classrooms, Just as Texas Reworks Its First-in-the-Nation Law

Olivia Espinoza's son with autism and nonverbal was unable to tell anybody about the abuse. While the disabled child was enrolled at an elementary school in Las Vegas in 2014, his special education teacher pushed and grabbed him, slapped his hands, and threw him to the ground. "I have a typical daughter, and when she comes from school, I ask her, 'What's going on at school? What did you do?' and she answers," Espinoza said. "But when my son comes from school, I don't know nothing about it." After at least three teachers aides spoke out, teacher James Doran pleaded guilty to battery- and Espinoza, who has sued the Clark County School District, is now calling on Nevada lawmakers to approve a bill requiring cameras in self-contained special education classrooms where more than half the students are nonverbal. Read More
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jobs

LATEST JOB LISTINGS POSTED ON NASET


* Special Education Teacher - We are currently seeking Special Education Teachers for our middle schools and high schools. The Special Education Teacher is responsible for ensuring that all special education students receive comprehensive, compassionate and equitable services in order to achieve breakthrough academic achievement and character development.  To learn more - Click here
* Arizona Special Education Teacher - STARS seeks Special Education Teachers for the 2017-2018 school year. and is able to offer you an unbeatable support system and resources. Stars places Special Education Teachers throughout the Phoenix, Tucson and the surrounding area public schools. To learn more - Click here
* Classroom Teacher - The Wardlaw School for children with dyslexia is currently seeking an outstanding professional to serve as classroom teacher in our multi-disciplinary, collaborative educational environment. To learn more - Click here
* Special Education Teachers - Will Relocate You! - Explore your passion for education and being a part of a culture where students learn; personal empowerment, self-determination and resiliency through a mind-frame of personal accountability. To learn more - Click Here
* Special Education Teacher - The Graham Academy is a private academic K-12 school that has immediate openings for special education positions within both their autism support and emotional support K-12 classrooms. To learn more - Click here
* Special Education Teachers - Work a four day week in sunny Arizona!  Kingman Unified School District is now hiring Elementary, Middle and High School Special Education Teachers for the 2017-2018 school year. To learn more - Click Here
* Teaching in New York City - New York City public schools offer competitive starting salaries ranging from $54,000 to $81,694, based on prior teaching experience as well as your undergraduate and graduate education. To learn more - Click Here
* Children's Quality Reviewer - In collaboration with the Bureau of Children's Services, this position will work to develop and conduct review activities to ensure compliance with federal and state requirements for children served under the Children's Long Term Care support waivers in Wisconsin. To Learn More - Click Here
* Director of Early Childhood Program - The Director is responsible for the overall functioning of Volunteers of America early childhood education and licensed child care programs, including a camp program. Has oversight of department budgets of approximately $1 million and direct or indirect supervision of 15+ employees and volunteers. To Learn More - Click Here
* Arizona: Special Education Teacher - $46,000/school year (180 days).  Summers off with year round pay.  Special Education Teachers needed in Arizona (Phoenix and surrounding cities). Needs are in the self-contained and resource settings serving students with emotional disabilities (ED), Autism (A), Severe/Profound (S/P), and Intellectual Disabilities (ID).  To learn more -
* Special Education Specialist - The primary responsibility of the Special Education Specialist is to provide instruction and other related services to Special Education students. The Special Education Specialist will also facilitate diagnostic assessment including administration, scoring and interpretation. To learn more - Click here
If you are an Employer looking for excellent special education staff - Click here for more information

Food For Thought..........

You have not lived today until you have done something for someone who can never repay you.

John Bunyon

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