Week in Review - August 1, 2014

NASET Sponsor - Lane Bryant

WEEK IN REVIEW

New NASET Publications and Articles of Interest in Special Education and Disabilities That Were Reported This Week

August 1, 2014 - Vol 10, Issue 31


 

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In This Issue

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

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Dear NASET News,

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW Here, we provide you with the latest publications from NASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW atnews@naset.org. Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,


NASET News Team

NASET Sponsor - SJU


New This Week on NASET

Genetics in Special Education Series

July 2014

By Kerri Beisner
This issue of NASET's Genetics in Special Education series was written by Kerri Beisner. Nature vs. nurture is a common debate in regards to human behavior; do people act the way they do because of their genetic makeup or because of environmental factors? Although genetics do undoubtedly play a role in an individual's development, it is important to recognize the great impact the environment can have as well. Uri Brofenbrenner, a well-known psychologist, studied the effect systems can have on a child's development by exploring the proximity of different environmental spheres and the strength of their impact on an individual. Currently, there are a very large number of students in special education programs that were born in 2000. Were there any environmental distractions that could have contributed to a higher number of students in special education born in or shortly after this year? The stock market crash of 2000 had an effect on the overall economy and family system. This article explores the correlation and relationship the stock market crash had on families and the possibly of its contribution to higher numbers of students in special education today.


To read or download this issue - Click here (login required)

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NASET's Special Educator e-Journal

August 2014


Table of Contents:
  • Update from the U.S. Department of Education
  • Legislative Announcements, Calls to Participate and New Projects
  • Special Education Resources Review 2014
  • Navigating the Road to Work: What's New at the National Collaborative Workforce and Disability
  • Latest Job Employment Opportunities Posted on NASET
  • Upcoming Conferences and Events
  • Funding Forecast and Award Opportunities
  • Acknowledgements
To read or download this issue - Click here (login required)

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See NASET's Latest Job Listings

Genes May Be Key to Language Delay in Kids

Twins' genes may play a greater role in language delay than their environment, according to a new study. Researchers found more evidence that language traits, such as vocabulary, putting words together and grammar, were largely inherited. The study involving 473 sets of twins revealed that the "twinning effect" (a lower level of language performance for twins than single-born children) was greater for identical twins than non-identical twins. "This finding disputes hypotheses that attribute delays in early language acquisition of twins to mothers whose attention is reduced due to the demands of caring for two toddlers," explained the study author Mabel Rice, a University of Kansas distinguished professor. "This should reassure busy parents who worry about giving sufficient individual attention to each child." To read more, click here

Many Kids With Medicaid Use ER as Doctor's Office: CDC

Children covered by Medicaid, the publicly funded insurance program for the poor, visit the emergency room for medical care far more often than uninsured or privately insured youngsters, a U.S. survey finds. And kids with Medicaid were more likely than those with private insurance to visit for a reason other than a serious medical problem, according to the 2012 survey conducted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Reliance on ER care for non-urgent health problems is an issue because of soaring health costs. The U.S. National Institutes of Health says treatment in an ER can cost two to three times more than the same care in a doctor's office. To read more, click here

NASET Sponsor - University of Cincinnati

Young Readers, Tomorrow's Leaders?

Young children with strong reading skills may be on a fast track to a brighter future, a new study suggests. Kids with above average reading skills may have higher intelligence levels as they get older, according to British researchers. The study included 1,890 identical twins from Great Britain who were given reading and intelligence tests when they were ages 7, 9, 10, 12 and 16. Because each pair of twins had the same genes and home environment, any differences between them had to be due to factors they didn't share, such as the quality of their teachers or friends who encouraged reading, the researchers suggested. To read more, click here

Justice Department Developing Disability Training For Police

Plans are in the works at the U.S. Department of Justice to roll out law enforcement training focused on people with disabilities. The Justice Department's Community Relations Service - a division that steps in to help communities address tension stemming from civil rights issues - is currently working on the effort, Attorney General Eric Holder said. The move follows the introduction of a similar training program in March designed to address law enforcement relations with the transgender community. To read more, click here

Parents of Children With Autism Need Help, Too

Most therapies for autism focus on the child, but new research suggests the child's stressed-out parents could benefit from treatments designed specifically for them. Mothers of children with autism who took part in a coping skills program found they connected better with their child and felt less stress, anxiety and depression, report researchers at Vanderbilt University, in Nashville. "Interventions have, for good reasons, been focused on the child, but what was missing was directly addressing parents' own well-being and health," said study author Elisabeth Dykens, a professor of psychology at Vanderbilt. "It's really important to provide them with the tools they can use to manage their stress, and continue to grow as a parent." To read more, click here

Obesity During Pregnancy Linked to Raised Asthma Risk in Kids

Women who are obese during pregnancy may be more likely to have children with asthma than normal-weight mothers, a new review suggests. "We found that, compared with children born from mothers of normal weight, those whose mothers were overweight or obese during pregnancy had up to 20 to 30 percent higher odds of asthma," said lead researcher Dr. Erick Forno, an assistant professor of pediatrics at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh. Forno's team also found that excess weight gain during pregnancy was associated with about a 16 percent increased risk of asthma in the children. "These results included studies that evaluated asthma at different time points in childhood, from a little over a year of age all the way to 16 years of age," Forno noted. To read more, click here

NASET Sponsor - Purdue University

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Guess the answer to this week's trivia question and we'll recognize you in next week's Week in Review.
THIS WEEK'S TRIVIA QUESTION:

According to the latest research on learning disabilities, adults with which type of learning disability are more likely to report that they were physically abused as children or teenagers than those who don't have this type of learning disability.

If you know the answer, send an email to contactus@naset.org
All answers must be submitted no later than Monday, August 4, 2014 at 12:00 p.m.

Congress Weighing Tax-Free Disability Savings Accounts

A long-stagnant bill that would establish a new way for people with disabilities to save money without jeopardizing their government benefits is starting to make its way through Congress. The legislation known as the Achieving a Better Life Experience, or ABLE, Act would allow people with disabilities to create special accounts where they could save up to $100,000 without risking eligibility for benefits like Social Security. What's more, under the plan, individuals would not lose Medicaid coverage no matter how much money is deposited in the proposed accounts. A U.S. Senate hearing Wednesday marked the first step in Congress for the bill which has been under consideration since 2006. To read more, click here

Tracking Device Proposal Gains Momentum

A federal effort to provide free tracking devices to children with autism and other disabilities who are at risk of wandering is getting a boost. Earlier this year, U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., introduced a bill known as Avonte's Law which would allocate $10 million per year in federal funding to provide electronic tracking devices to families wanting help monitoring their children. On Friday, Schumer said that a companion bill with bipartisan support is set to be introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives by Reps. Peter King, R-N.Y., and Grace Meng, D-N.Y. To read more, click here

Life Skills, Parenting Classes May Cut Inflammation in Poor Kids

Good parenting and life skills coaching seem to reduce inflammation in children from low-income families, a new study suggests. Inflammation is a common problem among poorer children, and can lead to a number of illnesses, according to Northwestern University researchers. "Many health problems in both childhood and adulthood involve excessive inflammation. The process has a role in diabetes, heart disease, allergies and some cancers," study author Gregory Miller, a professor of psychology, said in a university news release. To read more, click here

Even Mild Concussion Can Cause Thinking, Memory Problems: Study

A mild or moderate concussion may have longer-lasting consequences than previously realized, a new study suggests. By comparing brain imaging studies and thinking tests between healthy people and those with relatively minor concussions, the researchers found that the recovery of thinking skills can take a long time. Minor concussions can be caused by events such as falling off a bike, being in a slow-speed car crash or being hit in a fist-fight. Initially, those with concussions had thinking and memory test scores that were 25 percent lower than those in healthy people. One year after injury, however, while the scores for those with and without concussions were similar, those who had had brain injuries still had evidence of brain damage on imaging tests, with clear signs of continued disruption to key brain cells. To read more, click here

Genes May Raise Risk of Cerebral Palsy, Study Finds

New research suggests that genes may play a role in cerebral palsy, the most common cause of physical disability in children. Previous research has identified several pregnancy-related risk factors, including preterm delivery, abnormal growth, exposure to infection and lack of oxygen at birth. A possible family link with cerebral palsy has also been found, but not confirmed. Cerebral palsy affects your ability to move, and alters your balance and posture. In this study, researchers analyzed data from more than 2 million births in Norway between 1967 and 2002. They identified more than 3,600 cases of cerebral palsy, or 1.8 cases for every 1,000 children born during that period. To read more, click here

Kids From Dairy Farms Have Lower Allergy Risk, Study Finds

Children raised on dairy farms are much less likely to develop allergies than other youngsters, a new study finds. Researchers tracked children who lived in rural areas of Sweden, half of them on dairy farms, from birth until 3 years of age. Children on dairy farms had one-tenth the risk of developing allergies as other rural youngsters. "Our study also demonstrated for the first time that delayed maturation of the immune system, specifically B-cells, is a risk factor for development of allergies," researcher Anna-Carin Lundell, of the University of Gothenburg, said in a university news release. She and her colleagues found that children who had allergies at ages 18 to 36 months had higher levels of immature B-cells in their blood at birth and during the first month of life. To read more, click here

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NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

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As a member of NASET you qualify for a special group discount* on your auto, home, and renter's insurance through Group Savings Plus® from Liberty Mutual. This unique program allows you to purchase high-quality auto, home and renters insurance at low group rates.

 

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*Group discounts, other discounts, and credits are available where state laws and regulations allow, and may vary by state.  Certain discounts apply to specific coverage only.  To the extent permitted by law, applicants are individually underwritten; not all applicants may qualify.  Coverage provided and underwritten by Liberty Mutual Insurance Company and its affiliates, 175 Berkeley Street, Boston, MA.

Adolescent Alcohol Abuse Disrupts Transitions into early Adulthood

Adolescent alcohol abuse is known to be associated with adverse outcomes in early adulthood. It is unclear how much of this association is due to the influence of differences in familial background and shared genetics. New findings implicate a significant causal relationship between elevated drinking problems at age 18.5 and more adverse life outcomes at age 25 that cannot be fully explained by shared genetic and environmental liabilities. To read more, click here

Asthma Drugs Suppress Children's Growth, Study Suggest

Corticosteroid drugs that are given by inhalers to children with asthma may suppress their growth, evidence suggests. Two new systematic reviews published in The Cochrane Library focus on the effects of inhaled corticosteroid drugs (ICS) on growth rates. The authors found children's growth slowed in the first year of treatment, although the effects were minimised by using lower doses. Inhaled corticosteroids are prescribed as first-line treatments for adults and children with persistent asthma. They are the most effective drugs for controlling asthma and clearly reduce asthma deaths, hospital visits and the number and severity of exacerbations, and improve quality of life. Yet, their potential effect on the growth of children is a source of worry for parents and doctors. Worldwide, seven ICS drugs are currently available: beclomethasone, budesonide, ciclesonide, flunisolide, fluticasone, mometasone and triamcinolone. Ciclesonide, fluticasone and mometasone are newer and supposedly safer drugs. To read more, click here

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NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

Movie Theaters May Soon Be More Accessible

The Obama administration wants movie theaters nationwide to do more to accommodate people with disabilities. Officials at the U.S. Department of Justice said Friday that they are proposing new rules that would require movie theaters to offer captioning and audio description to ensure access for people with hearing and vision disabilities under the Americans with Disabilities Act. The rules would set a national standard for accessibility at the movies, officials said. Existing technology allows captioning to be provided to individuals at their seats that is only visible to those who request it. Audio description gives those with limited sight spoken narration of the visual elements of a film via a wireless headset. To read more, click here

Babies' Brains Prep for Speech Long Before First Words Come Out

Infants' brains start laying the groundwork for the physical requirements of speech long before they utter their first words, a new study finds. Researchers looked at 7- to 12-month-old infants and found that speech from people around them stimulates areas of the brain that coordinate and plan the motor movements necessary for speech. "Most babies babble by 7 months, but don't utter their first words until after their first birthdays," study author Patricia Kuhl, co-director of the Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences at the University of Washington, in Seattle, said in a university news release. To read more, click here

Honor Society for Special Education Teachers

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Smoking While Pregnant Linked to ADHD in Children

Children born to women who smoked during pregnancy appear to have an increased risk of developing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to new research. The new study also hints -- but doesn't prove -- that nicotine-replacement products used during pregnancy, such as patches and gum, could pose the same risk to children. Still, this study suggests that nicotine itself, not just tobacco, may be a hazard during pregnancy. "We've been lulled into a false sense of security, thinking that if we can just get mothers to stop smoking and onto nicotine replacement, it will protect against any kinds of fetal damage in the developing child. This is a stark injection of reality about how that may not be the case," said Dr. Timothy Wilens, director of the Center for Addiction Medicine and acting chief of child psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. To read more, click here

No Anti-Clotting Treatment Needed for Most Kids Undergoing Spine Surgeries

Blood clots occur so rarely in children undergoing spine operations that most patients require nothing more than vigilant monitoring after surgery and should be spared risky and costly anti-clotting medications, according to a new study. Because clotting risk in children is poorly understood, treatment guidelines are largely absent, leaving doctors caring for pediatric patients at a loss on whom to treat and when. To read more, click here

Cystic Fibrosis Drug Combo May Be Less Effective Than Hoped

A powerful drug combo may not be as effective against cystic fibrosis as previously thought. New lab-based research on human cells suggests that one of the medications might stop the other from working properly. However, this study's findings aren't definitive, and there's still hope for the medications known as ivacaftor (brand name Kalydeco) and lumacaftor, according to the study's senior author. "The development of drugs like ivacaftor and lumacaftor is undoubtedly a step forward, but our study suggests that more work will need to be done before we can realize the full potential of these drugs," said Martina Gentzsch, an assistant professor with the department of cell biology and physiology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. To read more, click here

jobsNASET's Latest Job Listings

* Executive Director -Horizon Academy is seeking candidates committed to the school's mission: To provide a caring and respectful environment for children struggling with learning disabilities, where they are given the opportunity to achieve their highest potential, become life-long learners, and develop into productive responsible citizens of their community. To learn more - click here

* Assistant Professor - Special Education - is a full-time Faculty position.  The incumbent is responsible for the coordination, planning, preparation, presentation, and evaluation of classroom instruction and related activities.  To learn more - click here

 

* Resource Specialist Teacher -  Bright Star Schools is seeking a Resource Specialist. Teachers will help develop and implement the curriculum. All teachers report to the Principal. To learn more - Click here

 

* $125,000 Salary for Master Middle School Teachers! - The Equity Project Charter School is a 5th through 8th grade middle school serving low-income students in the Washington Heights neighborhood of New York City.TEP is the school that pays its experienced teachers a $125,000 salary to work on a team of master practitioners in an environment that values and develops teaching excellence. - To learn more - Click here

 

* Special Education Teacher - Mesa Public Schools is committed to providing unprecedented excellence in education. We believe in holding all students to high academic expectations and providing the resources and support to ensure that each student is equipped with the skills, attitudes and values necessary for success in life. - To learn more - Click here

 

* Prepster Support Teacher - The Prepster Support Teacher works with Blue Chip Teachers, the Director of Academic Achievement and Prepster Support Coordinator to ensure our prepsters have the academic supports necessary to excel. - To learn more - Click here

Food For Thought..........

It is not enough that we do our best; sometimes we must do what is required.
Winston Churchill

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