Week in Review - January 3, 2014

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WEEK IN REVIEW

New NASET Publications and Articles of Interest in Special Education and Disabilities That Were Reported This Week

January 3, 2014 - Vol 10, Issue 1

 

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In This Issue

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

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Dear NASET News,

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW Here, we provide you with the latest publications from NASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW atnews@naset.org. Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,


NASET News Team

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New This Week on NASET

NASET's HOW TO Series
December 2013

How To Determine When your Students Needs Occupational Therapy

A child may need to be referred for Occupational Therapy if several of the following areas have been checked or if any of the above areas creates a functional delay or problem:

 

____has difficulty using 2 hands together or doesn't use 2 hands together

____has difficulty with writing, coloring, cutting or pasting....

 


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NASET's HOW TO Series
December 2013

 

How To Write an Assistive Technology Report


PURPOSE OF EVALUATION

The School District has requested an Assistive Technology Evaluation for John. This evaluation will focus on the use of technology to remediate, enhance and/or Provide John with options for improving his note taking skills.

To read or download this issue - Click here (login required)

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See NASET's Latest Job Listings
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Insights Gained Into Tourette Syndrome

New insight into what causes the uncontrolled movement and noises (tics) in people with Tourette syndrome may lead to new non-drug treatments for the disorder, a new study suggests. These tics appear to be caused by defective wiring in the brain that results in "hyper-excitability" in the regions that control motor function, according to the researchers at the University of Nottingham in England. "This new study is very important as it indicates that motor and vocal tics in children may be controlled by brain changes that alter the excitability of brain cells ahead of voluntary movements," Stephen Jackson, a professor in the school of psychology, said in a university news release. "You can think of this as a bit like turning the volume down on an over-loud motor system. This is important as it suggests a mechanism that might lead to an effective non-pharmacological therapy for Tourette syndrome." To read more, click here

Early Elective Childbirth May Raise Health Risks for Babies, Moms

Pregnant women who choose to have an early delivery put themselves and their babies at increased risk for complications, researchers warn. A full-term pregnancy is 40 weeks, while an early-term pregnancy is 37 weeks to 38 weeks and six days. In about 10 percent to 15 percent of all deliveries in the United States performed before 39 weeks, there is no good medical reason for the early delivery, according to the researchers. Illness and death rates "have increased in mothers and their babies that are born in the early-term period compared to babies born at 39 weeks or later. There is a need to improve awareness about the risks associated with this," Dr. Jani Jensen, a Mayo Clinic obstetrician and lead author of a review article on the topic, said in a Mayo news release. To read more, click here

Eating More Nuts During Pregnancy Might Help Prevent Allergies in Kids

Women who eat nuts during pregnancy -- and who aren't allergic themselves -- are less likely to have kids with nut allergies, a new study suggests. Dr. Michael Young, an associate clinical professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, and colleagues collected data on more than 8,200 children of mothers who took part in the Nurses' Health Study II. The women had reported what they ate before, during and after their pregnancies. About 300 of the children had food allergies. Of those, 140 were allergic to peanuts and tree nuts. To read more, click here

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NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

Girls' Brain Connectivity Happens Sooner Than for Boys

New brain research suggests one reason girls mature faster than boys during their teen years. As people age, their brains reorganize and reduce connections. In this study, scientists examined brain scans from 121 healthy people, aged 4 to 40. It's during this period that the major changes in brain connectivity occur. The researchers discovered that although the overall number of connections is reduced, the brain preserves long-distance connections important for integrating information. The findings might explain why brain function doesn't decline -- but instead improves -- during this period of connection pruning, according to the research team. To read more, click here

Big Strides in Battle Against Pediatric AIDS

The effect that AIDS is having on American kids has improved greatly in recent years, thanks to effective drugs and prevention methods. The same cannot be said, however, for children worldwide. "Maternal-to-child transmission is down exponentially [in the United States] because we do a good job at preventing it," said Dr. Kimberly Bates, director of a clinic for children and families with HIV/AIDS at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. In fact, the chances of a baby contracting HIV from his or her mother is now less than 1 percent in the United States, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. To read more, click here

Therapy That Confronts Trauma of Sexual Abuse Helped Teen Girls With PTSD

Teen girls struggling with post-traumatic stress disorder stemming from sexual abuse do well when treated with a type of therapy that asks them to repeatedly confront their traumatic memories, according to a small new study. The study's results suggest that "prolonged exposure therapy," which is approved for adults, is more effective at helping adolescent girls overcome post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than traditional supportive counseling. "Prolonged exposure is a type of cognitive behavior therapy in which patients are asked to recount aloud several times their traumatic experience, including details of what happened during the experience and what they thought and felt during the experience," said study author Edna Foa, a professor of clinical psychology at the University of Pennsylvania. To read more, click here

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Guess the answer to this week's trivia question and we'll recognize you in next week's Week in Review.

THIS WEEK'S TRIVIA QUESTION:
Preschool-age and school-age children with vision loss may develop a phenomenon known as "verbalisms".  What is a verbalism?

If you know the answer, send an email to contactus@naset.org
All answers must be submitted no later than Monday, January 6, 2014 at 12:00 p.m.

Behavioral Therapy Might Ease Kids' Migraine Symptoms

A specific type of therapy helps reduce the number of migraines and migraine-related disabilities in children and teens, according to a new study. The findings provide strong evidence for the use of "cognitive behavioral therapy" -- which includes training in coping with pain -- in managing chronic migraines in children and teens, said study leader Scott Powers, of Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, and colleagues. The therapy should be routinely offered as a first-line treatment, along with medications, he said. To read more, click here

Study Finds Autism More Challenging For Caregivers

Caregivers of kids with autism report more trouble accessing services and a greater impact on their families than do parents of children with other developmental disabilities. Despite having some similar needs, a new study indicates that the experiences of families living with autism differ significantly from those with intellectual disability, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome and other developmental disabilities as well as those with mental health conditions. To read more,click here

Feds Report Boost In Disability Hiring

The number of federal workers with disabilities is on the rise, with a new report finding that such employment has reached its highest level in more than three decades. The U.S. Office of Personnel Management said in a report released Thursday that the nation's largest employer added 16,653 new employees with disabilities during the 2012 fiscal year, bringing the total to nearly 220,000. That's more people with disabilities than have been employed by the government at any other time in the last 32 years, officials said. To read more, click here

Advocates Alarmed By 'Backtracking' On Teacher Standards

Disability advocates are protesting a move by the U.S. Department of Education that they say could leave students in the hands of poor-quality teachers. In a letter to U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, a coalition of almost 100 civil rights and disability advocacy groups including the Council for Exceptional Children, The Arc and the National Down Syndrome Society, among others, blasted federal education officials for what they called "apparent backtracking" on measures to ensure that all children have access to good-quality teachers. To read more, click here

Students With Disabilities in Florida District Outpace Peers on NAEP

Students with disabilities in Hillsborough County (Tampa), Fla., did markedly better than the national average of students with disabilities on the 2013 administration of the National Assessment of Educational Progress, also known as the "Nation's Report Card." Hillsborough County and 20 other urban districts have their scores reported separately, as part of the Trial Urban District Assessment, or TUDA. The special analysis of urban district performance started in 2002. Overall, scores on the TUDA were stagnant compared to the last time the tests were administered, in 2011. Candace Cortiella, the director of the Advocacy Institute, analyzed the results of the TUDA districts on her blog Our Kids Count. As she noted, Hillsborough's performance was one bright spot in a set of scores that showed most students with disabilities in urban districts are scoring well below the the average of students with disabilities nationwide. And the achievement gaps between students with disabilities and their general education peers remains wide, both in urban districts and nationwide. To read more, click here

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NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

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As a member of NASET you qualify for a special group discount* on your auto, home, and renter's insurance through Group Savings Plus® from Liberty Mutual. This unique program allows you to purchase high-quality auto, home and renters insurance at low group rates.

 

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House Education Committee Requests Report on IDEA Paperwork Burden

Two House Education Committee leaders are asking the Government Accountability Office to find out which parts of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act create the most paperwork for schools and districts, and to figure out why no state has taken advantage of paperwork-reduction pilot programs that were written into the law when it was reauthorized nearly 10 years ago. U.S. Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., the chairman of the House Education and the Workforce committee, and Rep. Todd Rokita, R-Ind., the chairman of the House education subcommittee on K-12 policy, both signed the letter, dated Dec. 17. In it, they also asked the agency to find out if innovative technology could play a role in reducing paperwork, and if administrative redundancies make the paperwork problem worse. To read more, click here

Two-Drug Combo Helps Adolescents With ADHD, Aggression

Prescribing both a stimulant and an antipsychotic drug to children with physical aggression and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), along with teaching parents to use behavior management techniques, reduces aggressive and serious behavioral problems in the children, according to a study conducted by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. The study was conducted in conjunction with the University of Pittsburgh, Stony Brook University in New York and Case Western Reserve University in Ohio. The findings published online this week ahead of publication in the January issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. To read more, click here

Making Sad Sense of Child Abuse

When a man in Israel was accused of sexually abusing his young daughter, it was hard for many people to believe -- a neighbor reported seeing the girl sitting and drinking hot chocolate with her father every morning, laughing, smiling, and looking relaxed. Such cases are not exceptional, however. Children react to sexual and physical abuse in unpredictable ways, making it hard to discern the clues. Now Dr. Carmit Katz of Tel Aviv University's Bob Shapell School of Social Work has found that when parents are physically abusive, children tend to accommodate it. But when the abuse is sexual, they tend to fight or flee it unless it is severe. The findings, published in Child Abuse & Neglect, help explain children's behavior in response to abuse and could aid in intervention and treatment. To read more, click here

AASEP Logo

NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

Honor Society for Special Education Teachers

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To learn more - Click here

 

jobsNASET's Latest Job Listings

* Autism Intervention Program Supervisor - A position is available for a special educator or a speech-language pathologist , to provide oversight of a private multidisciplinary intervention program for an 18-year-old male with moderate autism in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The first month or two to be spent in Los Angeles . To learn more - Click here

 

* Coordinator of Educational Advancement and Partner - This position is located in the Commission of Deaf, DeafBlind and Hard of Hearing for Minnesotans. This position exists to advance the education collaborative for children who are deaf and hard of hearing.  To learn more - Click here

 

* Special Education Teacher (moderate-severe) - Pacific Autism Center for Education (PACE) provides high quality programs for individuals with Autism and associated developmental disabilities in the San Francisco Bay Area. PACE's Special Education Teacher is responsible for maintaining a learning environment for students with Autism and related developmental disabilities. To learn more - Click here

Food For Thought..........

We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.

Winston Chirchill

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