Week in Review - September 20, 2013

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WEEK IN REVIEW

New NASET Publications and Articles of Interest in Special Education and Disabilities That Were Reported This Week

September 20, 2013 - Vol 9, Issue 38

 

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In This Issue

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

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Dear NASET News,

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW Here, we provide you with the latest publications from NASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW at news@naset.org.Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,


NASET News Team

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Honor Society for Special Education Teachers

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New This Week on NASET

NASET's HOW TO Series
September 2013

How To Determine Speech and Language Developmental Milestones: Birth to Age 5

 

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

What Are Speech and Language?

Speech and language are tools that humans use to communicate or share thoughts, ideas, and emotions. Language is the set of rules, shared by the individuals who are communicating, that allows them to exchange those thoughts, ideas, or emotions. Speech is talking, one way that a language can be expressed. Language may also be expressed through writing, signing, or even gestures in the case of people who have neurological disorders and may depend upon eye blinks or mouth movements to communicate.

 


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NASET's HOW TO Series
September 2013

How To Distinguish Emotional Disturbance vs Social Maladjustment

 

A student who receives special education services under the category of Emotional Disability has emotional problems of some kind that are adversely affecting his/her educational performance. Usually schools look at grades, discipline records, and performance on achievement tests to quantify educational impact. In determining eligibility for Emotional Disability, several evaluations are typically completed.

 


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Parent Teacher Conference Handout
September 2013

Adapting the Way a Child Responds in the Classroom

 

Introduction

There are numerous ways in which a child can exhibit his/her knowledge. A very important option when working with children with special needs will be to offer options that take into account leaning style, modality strengths i.e. visual learner, age, developmental motor skills, and attention span. Another very important factor in adapting the curriculum is to consider the use of a variety of response modes for the child with a disability. Providing many different options will increase the likelihood of success. As parents these different ways of presenting knowledge are thing that can be discussed with teachers to ensure that your child has a successful experience.

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See NASET's Latest Job Listings


CDC: Half Of Kids With Disabilities Skip Flu Shots

Despite an increased risk for complications from the flu, many children with intellectual disability, cerebral palsy and other disorders are not vaccinated to protect against the virus. Just half of children with neurologic or neurodevelopmental conditions receive the flu vaccine each year, according to a report published Thursday in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. That's similar to the vaccination rate for all children, but presents a dilemma because kids with special needs face bigger risks of hospitalization or even death if they contract the flu, officials said. To read more, click here


Did You Know That....

There are many variations in the format of an IFSP and in the ways that assistive technology (AT) is described on the plan. Tots-n-Tech has a resource brief that lays out guidelines, considerations, and additional resources on how to best include AT in the IFSP. To learn more, visit: http://tnt.asu.edu/files/Brief_6_IFSPHandout8-21-09.pdf


Teens' Antisocial Texts May Foretell Bad Behavior

Teens who text about bad behaviors such as drug use or fighting are more likely to actually engage in those behaviors as well, a new study finds. "We were interested in how adolescents use electronic communication, particularly text messaging," Samuel Ehrenreich, a post-doctoral researcher in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences at the University of Texas, Dallas, said in a university news release. "We examined how discussing antisocial behavior -- substance abuse, property crimes, physical aggression, that sort of thing -- predicts actually engaging in this problem behavior," Ehrenreich said. "Basically, does talking about bad behavior predict bad behavior?" To read more, click here


Bilinguals Increase Their Mental Flexibility, Study Finds

People who are bilingual, or speak two languages, likely have more mental flexibility than those who speak just one language, according to a new study. Researchers from Penn State University found that bilingual people have both languages active at all times and process both languages simultaneously. As a result, they are able to alternate between them without interruption. "In the past, bilinguals were looked down upon," said Judith Kroll, professor of psychology, linguistics and women's studies, in a university news release. "Not only is bilingualism not bad for you, it may be really good. When you're switching languages all the time, it strengthens your mental muscle, and your executive function becomes enhanced." To read more, click here


Honor Society for Special Education Teachers

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NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here


Strong Verbal Skills in Childhood May Raise Drinking Risk, Study Suggests

Teens and young adults who had high levels of language development during childhood drink and get drunk more often than others their age, and the influence of friends may be a major factor, a new study suggests. Researchers looked at data collected from twins in Finland when they were children, teens and young adults. The data collected included information from parents about the twins' ages when they started speaking words, learning to read and using expressive language skills in school. The twins provided information on drinking, intoxication and alcohol-related problems when they were teens and young adults. To read more, click here


Artist With Disability Gets Royal Treatment

Prince William and his wife Kate have chosen a painting from an artist with Down syndrome to display in their son's nursery. The acrylic depicting a balloon festival was created by Tazia Fawley, 43. She says the painting took her six months to create and it is reportedly valued at about $3,000, though she gave it to the royals as a gift in honor of Prince George's birth. "It's one of my favorite pieces of work," Fawley told SWNS. "I gave it to Kate and Wills as a present, because they seem like good people and they wanted to bring some color into their son's nursery." To read more, click here


Report: Child Neglect a Continuing Problem in U.S.

Cases of physical and sexual abuse of U.S. children seem to have declined over the past 20 years, but cases of neglect appear unchanged, health officials reported Thursday. Child neglect accounts for about 75 percent of all cases of abuse, while physical abuse accounts for 15 percent and sexual abuse 10 percent, according to the study from the Institute of Medicine. Boys and girls face about the same risk of neglect and abuse. In 80 percent of cases it's parents who are the neglectors and abusers -- and of these, 87 percent are biological parents. More than half the time the perpetrators are women, according to the report. To read more, click here


'Exposure Therapy' Along With Antidepressants May Help With OCD

New research suggests that patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder do better when they combine intensive "exposure therapy" with an antidepressant rather than taking a common two-drug combination. There are caveats, however: The kind of exposure therapy used in the study required patients to see therapists twice a week, which can be expensive; some obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) patients simply refuse to engage in this kind of therapy; and it's not clear what happens to patients in the long term. To read more, click here


Did You Know That....

Funded by the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), the IRIS Center offers a wide variety of online learning modules, case studies, activities, and more. IRIS' evidence-based materials cover topics such as classroom management, Response to Intervention (RTI), differentiated instruction, and much more. IRIS's resources are always of the highest quality, extremely relevant, and FREE. To learn more, visit: http://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/


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NASET Sponsor - University of Kansas

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New Registry Aims to Serve People With Down Syndrome

The first national Down syndrome registry in the United States has been launched by the U.S. National Institutes of Health. The DS-Connect web-based registry will serve as a free resource for people with Down syndrome and their families, as well as health care providers and researchers. Participation in the registry is voluntary. "The Down syndrome community has voiced a strong need for a centralized, secure database to store and share health information. DS-Connect fills that need, and helps link individuals with Down syndrome to the doctors and scientists working to improve their health and quality of life," Yvonne Maddox, deputy director of the U.S. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), said in a news release from the National Institutes of Health. The NICHD funded and developed the registry. To read more, click here


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TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Guess the answer to this week's trivia question and we'll recognize you in next week's Week in Review.
Congratulations to: Wayne Buletza, Jennifer L. Melloy, Alexandra Pirard, Olumide Akerele, Lois Nembhard, Jan Simmons, Marilyn Haile, Dawn Cox, Pamela Downing-Hosten, Ope-Oluwa Olubela, Mike Namian, and Prahbhjot Malhi
who all knew the answer to last week's trivia question:

What do Tiger Woods, Bruce Willis, Carly Simon, Marilyn Monroe, and James Earl Jones all have in common? They all had difficulties with stuttering (dysfleuncy).


THIS WEEK'S TRIVIA QUESTION:
In the field of special education, we often refer to children with disabilities as "exceptional" children? What does the word "exceptional" mean when referring to special education and children with special needs?

If you know the answer, send an email to contactus@naset.org
All answers must be submitted no later than Monday, September 23, 2013 at 12:00 p.m.


Evidence Lacking On Transition Programs

A federal report suggests that far too little is known about the effectiveness of various types of transition programs in preparing students with disabilities for adulthood. Despite significant emphasis in special education policy on the importance of transition, a new review from the National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance at the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences found that not much is known about what approaches work best. Researchers looked at studies conducted between April 2008 and June 2011 examining the post-high school outcomes of students with disabilities who participated in transition programs. Specifically, they sought to examine whether or not students who participated in the programs were likely to be employed, live independently or continue their training or education after leaving high school. To read more, click here


Scientists Shed New Light on Cerebral Palsy, Early Infant Death

Researchers say they've pinpointed risk factors that contribute to cerebral palsy and early infant death. The U.S. and Australian researchers compared the medical records of children with cerebral palsy and infants who died within one month of birth with the records of healthy children to determine how often four risk factors occurred in each group. The risk factors included asphyxial birth events -- incidents during labor and delivery that had the potential to interfere with oxygen getting to the newborn's brain. The other risk factors were inflammation (signs of infection), birth defects and poor fetal growth, which was defined as low birth weight plus some other factors related to expected size. To read more, click here


NASET Sponsor - University of Kansas

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AASEP Logo

NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here


Genetic Cause of Childhood Leukemia Identified

For the first time, a genetic link specific to risk of childhood leukemia has been identified, according to a team of researchers from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, University of Washington, and other institutions. The discovery was reported online today in the journal Nature Genetics. "We're in uncharted territory," said study author Kenneth Offit, MD, MPH, Chief of the Clinical Genetics Service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering. "At the very least this discovery gives us a new window into inherited causes of childhood leukemia. More immediately, testing for this mutation may allow affected families to prevent leukemia in future generations." To read more, click here


With Horses and iPads, Children with Autism Learn to Communicate

Luke, a 7-year-old child with autism had primarily only expressed requests to his parents (e.g., I want a drink), but this past year he was given a 1-pound iPad, introduced to a 1,000 pound horse and a special program called Strides©. During the concentrated eight-week Strides© program, Luke used the iPad to have his first two-way conversation, share his feelings and tell his new friends about how he lost his tooth. Children with autism have great difficulty developing verbal communications skills; 40 percent are, like Luke, nonverbal. Southern Tier Alternative Therapies, Inc. (STAT), together with Tina Caswell, a clinical faculty member in Ithaca College's Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, is addressing this issue by combining equine therapy and assistive technology through an exclusive program called Strides©. To read more, click here


Liberty Mutual Savings

NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Group Savings Plus from Liberty Mutual

As a member of NASET you qualify for a special group discount* on your auto, home, and renter's insurance through Group Savings Plus® from Liberty Mutual. This unique program allows you to purchase high-quality auto, home and renters insurance at low group rates.

 

See for yourself how much money you could save with Liberty Mutual compared to your current insurance provider. For a free, no-obligation quote, call 800-524-9400 or visit

www.libertymutual.com/naset, or visit your local sales office.

*Group discounts, other discounts, and credits are available where state laws and regulations allow, and may vary by state.  Certain discounts apply to specific coverage only.  To the extent permitted by law, applicants are individually underwritten; not all applicants may qualify.  Coverage provided and underwritten by Liberty Mutual Insurance Company and its affiliates, 175 Berkeley Street, Boston, MA.


Should People Who Are Blind Be Allowed To Carry Guns?

A new debate over disability rights is emerging as Iowa grants permits for people who are blind to carry guns. Changes to state law in 2011 allowed those with visual impairments to legally carry guns in public. And officials in one Iowa county say they've issued permits to at least three people who are legally unable to drive because of their limited sight. "It seems a little strange, but the way the law reads, we can't deny them (a permit) just based on that one thing," Sgt. Jana Abens of the Polk County sheriff's office told the Des Moines Register. The situation is leaving disability advocates and law enforcement officials split over whether or not it's appropriate for those with limited to no vision to have access to firearms. To read more, click here


Five-Fold Increase in ADHD Medication Use in Children and Adolescents

Use of stimulant medications to treat Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents has increased significantly over the past several years. This trend toward increased use of prescription stimulants extends beyond ADHD to other types of neuropsychiatric disorders in children and teens as well, including Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), according to a study published in Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology. To read more, click here


Faulty Stem Cell Regulation May Contribute to Cognitive Deficits Associated With Down Syndrome

Michael Clarke and his colleagues were the first to discover that Down syndrome may be linked to faulty stem cell regulation. The learning and physical disabilities that affect people with Down syndrome may be due at least in part to defective stem cell regulation throughout the body, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. The defects in stem cell growth and self-renewal observed by the researchers can be alleviated by reducing the expression of just one gene on chromosome 21, they found. To read more, click here


Did You Know That....

The Center on Online Learning and Students with Disabilities is your federally funded center for research and information about how students with disabilities can effectively participate in online learning. The Center's website includes research reports, a chart identifying accessibility features of various technologies used in online learning, an informative blog, and more. To learn more, visit: http://centerononlinelearning.org/


New Genetic Clue to Anorexia

The largest DNA-sequencing study of anorexia nervosa has linked the eating disorder to variants in a gene coding for an enzyme that regulates cholesterol metabolism. The finding suggests that anorexia could be caused in part by a disruption in the normal processing of cholesterol, which may disrupt mood and eating behavior. "These findings point in a direction that probably no one would have considered taking before," said Nicholas J. Schork, a professor at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI). Schork was the senior investigator for the multicenter study, which was published recently online ahead of print in the journal Molecular Psychiatry. To read more, click here


Children With Autism Who Have Better Motor Skills Are More Adept at Socializing

In a new study looking at toddlers and preschoolers with autism, researchers found that children with better motor skills were more adept at socializing and communicating. Published online today in the journal Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, this study adds to the growing evidence of the important link between autism and motor skill deficits. Lead author Megan MacDonald is an assistant professor in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University. She is an expert on the movement skills of children with autism spectrum disorder. Researchers tested 233 children ages 14 to 49 months diagnosed with autism. "Even at this early age, we are already seeing motor skills mapping on to their social and communicative skills," MacDonald said. "Motor skills are embedded in everything we do, and for too long they have been studied separately from social and communication skills in children with autism." To read more, click here


Youth More Likely to Be Bullied at Schools With Anti-Bullying Programs

Anti-bullying initiatives have become standard at schools across the country, but a new UT Arlington study finds that students attending those schools may be more likely to be a victim of bullying than children at schools without such programs. The findings run counter to the common perception that bullying prevention programs can help protect kids from repeated harassment or physical and emotional attacks. "One possible reason for this is that the students who are victimizing their peers have learned the language from these anti-bullying campaigns and programs," said Seokjin Jeong, an assistant professor of criminology and criminal justice at UT Arlington and lead author of the study, which was published in the Journal of Criminology. To read more, click here


Autism Gene Stunts Neurons, but Growth Can Be Restored

Brown University researchers have traced a genetic deficiency implicated in autism in humans to specific molecular and cellular consequences that cause clear deficits in mice in how well neurons can grow the intricate branches that allow them to connect to brain circuits. The researchers also show in their study (online Sep. 12, 2013, in Neuron) that they could restore proper neuronal growth by compensating for the errant molecular mechanisms they identified. The study involves the gene that produces a protein called NHE6. Mutation of the gene is directly associated with a rare and severe autism-related condition known as Christianson syndrome. But scientists, including senior author Dr. Eric Morrow, have also associated the protein with more general autism. To read more, click here


jobsNASET's Latest Job Listings

* TEACHER - Tufts Educational Day Care Center is an innovative year-round, full-day educational preschool and kindergarten program for children from within the Tufts community and surrounding cities. TEDCC serves as a laboratory site for the University and is affiliated with the Department of Child Development, in the School of Arts and Sciences at Tufts University. The center enrolls approximately 82 children ages 2.9-6. - Click here

 

* Special Education Teacher, Emotional Support - The Southeast Delco School District is seeking a Special Education Teacher for an Emotional Support class at Academy Park High School in the Southeast Delco School District. This contracted position will teach emotional support high school students. To learn more -Click here

 

* Special Education Teacher - Paideia Academies is looking for a Special Education Teacher in the Phoenix Arizona area. The Mission of Paideia Academy is to challenge and inspire learners by providing a rigorous, content-rich, classical education incorporating languages, music, and the arts while nurturing positive character development. To learn more -Click here

 

* High School Special Education Teacher - UNO's educational philosophy is grounded in the principle that the key to student success is the powerful presence of adults in each child's life. UNO aims to recruit only the most talented, dedicated, and visionary professionals that are capable of creating and cultivating genuine relationships with our key stakeholders; students, parents, and the community. To learn more - Click here

 

* Special Education Certified Teachers - Agua Fria Union High School District was established in 1955. Today, the district serves the communities of Litchfield, Goodyear, Avondale, Buckeye and part of Glendale with its four high schools. Come be a part of our district, we offer competitive salaries, eligible for health benefits and additional compensation. To learn more-Click here



Food For Thought..........

Act as if what you do makes a difference. It does.
William James

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