Week in Review - September 6, 2013

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WEEK IN REVIEW

New NASET Publications and Articles of Interest in Special Education and Disabilities That Were Reported This Week

September 6, 2013 - Vol 9, Issue 36

 

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TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK


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Dear NASET News,

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW Here, we provide you with the latest publications from NASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW at news@naset.org.Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,


NASET News Team


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New This Week on NASET

NASET's Special Educator e-Journal
September 2013

Table of Contents
  • Update from the U.S. Department of Education-- Keeping Students with Disabilities Safe from Bullying
  • Calls to Participate
  • Special Education Resources
  • Update From The National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities (NICHCY)
  • Upcoming Conferences and Events
  • Funding Forecast and Award Opportunities
  • An In-Depth Look at RtI: Using Current Research to Examine Its Effectiveness and Areas for Growth  By Eilyn Sanabria, Florida International University
  • Acknowledgements
  • Download a PDF Version of This Issue

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The Practical Teacher Series
September 2013

This Month's Topic:Enjoying Favorite Books with Struggling Readers Part 2

By Matthew Glavach, Ph.D.


Children enjoy books more when they do not have to stop and sound out difficult words.  Researchers have found that readers with reading problems are more likely to be interrupted during reading and that the focus of the interruption is on sounding out words.  The reader begins to anticipate the interruption and reads each word waiting to be interrupted.  Without realizing it, we are developing word by word readers instead of fluent readers. Studies show that engaging children in repeated reading of text with limited, if any, interruptions is particularly effective in encouraging more fluent reading with struggling readers. This issue of NASET's Practical Teacher series was written by Matthew Glavach, Ph.D.  In Enjoying Favorite Books with Struggling Readers, Part 2, Dr. Matthew Glavach has added timed reading to repeated reading.  Reading quickly and fluently gives the brain time to comprehend what is being read.

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IEP Component Series
September 2013

An Overview of Assistive Technology and the IEP:  A Resource for Parents of Children with Special Needs in Your Classroom


The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) requires public schools to make available to all eligible children with disabilities a free appropriate public education (FAPE) in the least restrictive environment appropriate to their individual needs. The law requires that public schools develop appropriate Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) for each child. The IEP is a written plan for educating a child with a disability. The IEP describes the student's specific special education needs as well as any related services, including assistive technology. This issue of NASET's IEP Components series, written by the Family Center on Technology and Disability (http://www.fctd.info/factsheet/atiep), focuses on assistive technology and the IEP. It is written for parents and can be used as an excellent resource for them to understand the basics of the topic.

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Hawaii Age Limit on Special Education Struck Down

The state of Hawaii may not restrict special education to students age 20 and younger, a federal appeals court ruled last Wednesday, because the state provides general secondary education diploma programs to adults. The federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act generally requires states to provide a free, appropriate public education to students with disabilities from age 3 to 21, inclusive. But the federal law provides an exception for ages 3 through 5 and 18 through 21 when a state law or practice limits education services for those age groups. To read more, click here


Did You Know That....

The Individualized Education Program (IEP) section of the NICHCY website provides answers to frequently-asked IEP questions: Who's on the IEP team? What's in an IEP? What happens at IEP meetings? Can a member of the team be excused from attending an IEP meeting? For more information, visit:
http://nichcy.org/schoolage/iep


Kids' Attitudes About Disabilities Improve with Exposure

Children who are exposed to people with disabilities - either directly or indirectly - have more positive attitudes about those with special needs, researchers say. In a survey of 1,520 kids ages 7 to 16, researchers found that increased familiarity with those who have disabilities led to less anxiety and better attitudes. "We have known for some time that integrating children with disabilities into the regular classroom can improve attitudes. What we have established here is just how much of a difference a greater presence in day-to-day life makes," said Megan MacMillan of the University of Exeter Medical School in England who presented the findings Thursday at the British Psychological Society's annual conference. To read more, click here


New Clues to Causes of Autism Found

A group of enzymes in the brain appears to be key to the activity of many genes linked to autism, a new study reveals. Experts hope the findings will shed light on the causes of autism, and possibly lead to new treatments. The study results, published online Aug. 28 in the journal Nature, hint that if disruptions in enzymes called topoisomerases occur during brain development, they might contribute to the development of autism spectrum disorders. To read more, click here


Honor Society for Special Education Teachers

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NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here


Hundreds of Thousands of Teens Use Pot, Alcohol Each Day: Report

Despite recent gains against substance abuse by American teens, hundreds of thousands of them use marijuana and alcohol on a given day, U.S. health officials reported Thursday. On a typical day, an estimated 881,684 kids aged 12 to 17 smoke cigarettes, 646,707 use marijuana and 457,672 drink alcohol, according to a report by the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). The number of teens smoking pot on a given day could almost fill the 250,000-seat Indianapolis Speedway two and a half times, the report pointed out. To read more, click here


Study: Postsecondary Transition Programs Lack Effectiveness Evidence

Compared to their same-age, typically developing peers, students with disabilities are less likely to take postsecondary classes (60 percent versus 67 percent) and be living on their own eight years after leaving high school (45 percent versus 59 percent). But, despite the emphasis on transition planning in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, relatively little research on transition programs meets What Works Clearinghouse standards for evidence of effectiveness, according to a report released this month, "Improving Post-High School Outcomes for Transition-Age Students with Disabilities: An Evidence Review." To read more, click here


Autism Communication Disconnect May Subside With Age

New research suggests that children with high-functioning autism often outgrow at least one facet of their disability as they reach adolescence. Many kids with autism have trouble linking the visual and sound-based cues associated with speech, which can present trouble in navigating school and social situations. However, the problem appears to clear up as they age, according to findings published online this week in the journal Cerebral Cortex. "This is an extremely hopeful finding," said John Foxe, a professor of pediatrics at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine at Yeshiva University and the study's lead author. To read more, click here


Brain Size May Yield Clues to Anorexia

Teens with anorexia nervosa have bigger brains than those without the eating disorder, a finding that suggests biology may play a larger role in the condition than realized. Specifically, the teenage girls with anorexia had a larger insula, a part of the brain that is active when you taste food, and a larger orbitofrontal cortex, the part of the brain that tells you when to stop eating, said researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine. "While eating disorders are often triggered by the environment, there are most likely biological mechanisms that have to come together for an individual to develop an eating disorder such as anorexia nervosa," Dr. Guido Frank, an assistant professor of psychiatry and neuroscience, said in a university news release. To read more, click here


Did You Know That....

The U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences' National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) has released "Characteristics of Public School Districts in the United States: Results From the 2011-12 Schools and Staffing Survey." This First Look report provides selected findings from the Schools and Staffing Survey Public School District Data File regarding public school districts that were in operation during the 2011-12 school year. The data include information on district size, teacher salary and benefits, and graduation requirements. For more information, visit: http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2013311


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What is 'Play' to a Child with Autism?

When free to choose, kids with autism pick games that engage their senses and avoid games that ask them to pretend, a new study finds. Experts said the results are not surprising. It's known, for instance, that when children do not show an interest in pretend play, such as "feeding" a doll, by about age 2, that is a potential sign of an autism spectrum disorder. What is unique about the new study is that it went out into the real world, said lead researcher Kathy Ralabate Doody, an assistant professor of exceptional education at the State University of New York, Buffalo State. To read more, click here


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TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Guess the answer to this week's trivia question and we'll recognize you in next week's Week in Review.
Congratulations to: Paula Wynen, Ope-Oluwa Olubela, Deborah Cole, Jasmin Guzman, Olumide Akerele, Anne L. Grothaus, Natalie McQueen, Alexandra Pirard, Karen Smithwick, Erika Donahue, Andrew Bailey, Pamela R. Downing-Hosten, Debra Silsbee, Gillian Rose, Marilyn Haile, Mike Namian, and Barry Amper
who all knew the answer to last week's trivia question: Who was the reporter who brought national attention to Willowbrook? Answer: Geraldo Rivera

THIS WEEK'S TRIVIA QUESTION:
In 2015, the United States will host the Special Olympics World Summer Games. In what city will they be held?

If you know the answer, send an email to contactus@naset.org
All answers must be submitted no later than Monday, September 9, 2013 at 12:00 p.m.


Stomach Bug Vaccine for Infants Protects Entire Community: CDC

Vaccinating babies against rotavirus also protects older children and adults against infection with the stomach bug, a new study shows. Since 2008, the vaccine has prevented up to 50,000 hospitalizations for rotavirus each year among children under the age of 5, according to researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Before the vaccine was introduced [in 2006], about 60,000 to 70,000 children were hospitalized every year, and between 20 and 60 died," said report co-author Ben Lopman, an epidemiologist in the division of viral diseases at the CDC. "This study also shows that hospitalizations for rotavirus have also gone down in older children and adults who have not been vaccinated. In other words, there is an indirect effect that we call 'herd immunity,'" Lopman explained. To read more, click here


Ed. Dept. Proposes to End Testing Under Modified Standards

This school year would be the last one where states could test students under modified academic achievement standards and have those tests count toward No Child Left Behind accountability rules, according to proposed rules published today in the Federal Register. The department is soliciting comments on the proposed change through Oct. 7. The alternate assessments are sometimes shorthanded as "2 percent tests," instead of their official name, "alternate assessments based on modified academic achievement standards." Regulations currently allow 2 percent of all students, or about 20 percent of students with disabilities, to take such assessments and be counted as proficient under the No Child Left Behind Act. To read more, click here


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NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here


With Talking Guide, TV Becoming More Accessible

How does a person who's blind find what to "watch" on a TV with 200 channels and 46,000 video-on-demand choices of movies, shows and clips? Tom Wlodkowski, an executive at Comcast Corp. who is blind, thinks he has the answer: a talking TV channel guide. No joke. "The television is not strictly as visual a medium as you might think," said David Goldfield, a computer technology instructor at the Associated Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired. "Radio drama in the U.S. is more or less dead. If you are blind and you want a good story, you're still going to get it on television." To read more, click here


Stuttering May Not Cause Emotional Woes in Preschoolers: Study

Preschoolers who stutter typically do not suffer emotional or social problems because of it, and even tend to have stronger language skills than their peers, a new study suggests. Researchers said the findings offer reassurance to parents, but also stressed that the study looked at averages. So, some young children who stutter may have emotional difficulties, such as being shy or withdrawn. "Speech pathologists who treat young children who stutter certainly see evidence of those behaviors," said lead researcher Sheena Reilly, of the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute in Victoria, Australia. To read more, click here


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NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Group Savings Plus from Liberty Mutual

As a member of NASET you qualify for a special group discount* on your auto, home, and renter's insurance through Group Savings Plus® from Liberty Mutual. This unique program allows you to purchase high-quality auto, home and renters insurance at low group rates.

 

See for yourself how much money you could save with Liberty Mutual compared to your current insurance provider. For a free, no-obligation quote, call 800-524-9400 or visit

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More Links Seen Between Autism, ADHD

Kids with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are 20 times more likely to exhibit some traits of autism than children without ADHD, according to a new study. One of every five ADHD kids in the study exhibited signs of autism such as slow language development, difficulty interacting with others and problems with emotional control, said study co-author Dr. Joseph Biederman, director of the pediatric psychopharmacology unit at Massachusetts General Hospital. These kids also showed problems with "executive function," or the ability to plan, organize and conceptualize future action, said Biederman, a professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. To read more, click here


Omega-3 Reduces ADHD Symptoms in Rats

A new multidisciplinary study shows a clear connection between the intake of omega-3 fatty acids and a decline in ADHD symptoms in rats. Researchers at the University of Oslo have observed the behaviour of rats and have analyzed biochemical processes in their brains. The results show a clear improvement in ADHD-related behaviour from supplements of omega-3 fatty acids, as well as a faster turnover of the signal substances dopamine, serotonin and glutamate in the nervous system. There are, however, clear sex differences: a better effect from omega-3 fatty acids is achieved in male rats than in female. To read more, click here


Researchers Find Essential Brain Circuit in Visual Development

A study in mice reveals an elegant circuit within the developing visual system that helps dictate how the eyes connect to the brain. The research, funded by the National Institutes of Health, has implications for treating amblyopia, a vision disorder that occurs when the brain ignores one eye in favor of the other. Amblyopia is the most common cause of visual impairment in childhood, and can occur whenever there is a misalignment between what the two eyes see -- for example, if one eye is clouded by a cataract or if the eyes are positioned at different angles. The brain at first has a slight preference for the more functional eye, and over time -- as that eye continues to send the brain useful information -- the brain's preference for that eye gets stronger at the expense of the other eye. To read more, click here


Did You Know That....

The U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences' National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) has released "Characteristics of Public and Private Elementary and Secondary Schools in the United States: Results From the 2011-12 Schools and Staffing Survey." This First Look report provides descriptive statistics and basic information from the 2011-12 Schools and Staffing Survey Public and Private School Data Files. For more information, visit: http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2013312


Teacher's Allergy Forces Girl with Autism to Change Schools

A first-grader with autism who uses a service dog and a special-education teacher who is allergic to dogs are the focus of a dispute in the Athens school district in southeastern Ohio. Charla Gretz said the special-education director pulled her aside on the first day of school and told her that 6-year-old Shyanna Gretz and her black Labrador retriever, Spring, could not attend Morrison-Gordon Elementary School as planned. That's because the special-education teacher assigned to teach Shyanna is severely allergic to dog dander. To read more, click here


Epilepsy Drug Dosage Linked to Specific Birth Defects

In a world first, new Australian medical research has given pregnant women with epilepsy new hope of reducing their chance of having a baby with physical birth defects. According to research published in the September 2013 issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, epilepsy experts at The Royal Melbourne Hospital have discovered a link between high doses of common epilepsy drug valproate and the increased risk of having a baby with spina bifida or hypospadias. Royal Melbourne Hospital epilepsy specialist and Head of the Department of Medicine at The University of Melbourne, Professor Terry O'Brien, said there was increasing concern among clinicians, patients and their families about the risk to the developing fetus of mothers taking valproate. To read more, click here


Extremely Preterm Infants and Risk of Developing Neurodevelopmental Impairment Later in Childhood

A meta-analysis of previously reported studies by Gregory P. Moore, M.D., F.R.C.P.C., of The Ottawa Hospital, Ontario, Canada, and colleagues examined the rate of moderate to severe and severe neurodevelopmental impairment by gestational age in extremely preterm survivors followed up between ages 4 and 8 years, and determined whether there is a significant difference in impairment rates between the successive weeks of gestation of survivors. The search of English-language publications found nine studies that met inclusion criteria of being published after 2004, a prospective cohort study, follow-up rate of 65 percent or more, use of standardized testing or classification for impairment, reporting by gestation, and meeting prespecified definitions of impairment. Researchers then extracted data using a structured data collection form and investigators were contacted for data clarification. To read more, click here


Children with Autism Can Outgrow Difficulty Understanding Visual Cues and Sounds

Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have shown that high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (ASD) children appear to outgrow a critical social communication disability. Younger children with ASD have trouble integrating the auditory and visual cues associated with speech, but the researchers found that the problem clears up in adolescence. The study was published today in the online edition of the journal Cerebral Cortex. "This is an extremely hopeful finding," said lead author John Foxe, Ph.D., professor of pediatrics and in the Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience, as well as director of research of the Children's Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center at Einstein. "It suggests that the neurophysiological circuits for speech in these children aren't fundamentally broken and that we might be able to do something to help them recover sooner." To read more, click here


jobsNASET's Latest Job Listings

* High School Special Education Teacher - UNO's educational philosophy is grounded in the principle that the key to student success is the powerful presence of adults in each child's life. UNO aims to recruit only the most talented, dedicated, and visionary professionals that are capable of creating and cultivating genuine relationships with our key stakeholders; students, parents, and the community. To learn more - Click here

 

* Special Education Certified Teachers - Agua Fria Union High School District was established in 1955. Today, the district serves the communities of Litchfield, Goodyear, Avondale, Buckeye and part of Glendale with its four high schools. Come be a part of our district, we offer competitive salaries, eligible for health benefits and additional compensation. To learn more-Click here

 

* Headmaster - The Fletcher Academy is looking for a new Headmaster to learn and sustain the Fletcher approach, to continue recruiting and supporting outstanding teachers and staff, to assess needs and provide tools for 21st century learning, and to preserve and enhance the school's very caring, nurturing environment. To learn more- Click here

 

* $125,000 Salary for Master Middle School Teachers! - Join a team of master teachers at The Equity Project (TEP) Charter School. TEP is a 480-student 5th through 8th grade middle school in the Washington Heights neighborhood of New York City. To learn more - Click here

 


Food For Thought..........

Unexpected kindness is the most powerful, least costly, and most underrated agent of human change.

Bob Kerrey

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