Week in Review - November 9, 2012

WEEK IN REVIEW

New NASET Publications and Articles of Interest in Special Education and Disabilities That Were Reported This Week

November 9, 2012 - Vol 8, Issue 42


 

Find us on Facebook

 

Forward this issue to a Friend

 

Join Our Mailing List!

In This Issue

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Quick Links

Read Week in Review on NASET -Click Here

Renew Your Membership on NASET- Click Here (login required)

NASET Resources - Click Here

NASET e-Publications - Click Here

Forgot your User Name or Password? - Click Here

Update/Manage Your Member Profile - Click Here (login required)


Dear NASET News,

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW Here, we provide you with the latest publications from NASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW at news@naset.org.Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,


NASET News Team

NASET Sponsor - Cal Poly Pomona

Cal_Poly_Pomona-8-12

To learn more - Click here

NASET Sponsor - Arkansas State Univeristy

ASU_to_12-3-12

To learn more - Click here

NASET Sponsor - Liberty Mutual

Liberty_Mutual_Bear

To learn more - Click here


New This Week on NASET

The Practical Teacher- November 2012

A Primer on Behavior Management

Reprinted with permission from Dr. Thomas McIntyre

We all imagine ourselves becoming a "master teacher". We bring to mind images of enthralled students enthusiastically participating in our lessons. We imagine our hard work and intensive study paying off in a highly rewarding series of years leading up to our retirement. However, we can't do our job and reach the highest levels of professional practice if the kids won't attend to the lessons and be civil in their interactions with others. We can't teach the material (and kids can't learn it well) if our behavior management skills are underdeveloped. What might be the most crucial aspect of teaching (with respect to our career satisfaction and longevity), is the most complex and difficult to master. Proficiency in behavior management, unlike the teaching of subject matter, or interventions for students with learning disabilities, involves much, much more than following the procedures stated in the manual. The focus of this issue of NASET's Practical Teacher, written by Dr. Thomas McIntyre, will be to address behavior management and developing excellence in multiple areas of "discipline": classroom design and arrangement; setting up and running a comprehensive classroom management system; counseling and communication skills; instructional practices for teaching new behaviors; being able to develop positive emotional bonds with students; knowing when and how to modify the vast number of procedures that we have placed in our "behavior management tool kit", and so much more.


To read or download this issue - Click here (login required)
______________________________________________________



Common Antidepressants Too Risky During Pregnancy, Researchers Say

Women who take a popular class of antidepressants during pregnancy may be risking the health of their developing fetus, and the risk may outweigh any benefit to the mother, a new review of data suggests. According to new research, use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) -- which include Celexa, Paxil, Prozac and Zoloft -- while pregnant can increase the risk of miscarriage, preterm birth, pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia and neurobehavioral problems such as autism later in life. "There is clear and concerning evidence of risk when pregnant women use these medications," said Dr. Adam Urato, senior author of a study appearing in the Oct. 31 online edition of Human Reproduction. To read more, click here


Did You Know That....

Meningitis is a disease caused by the inflammation of the protective membranes covering the brain and spinal cord known as the meninges. The inflammation is usually caused by an infection of the fluid surrounding the brain and spinal cord.

Single Protein Targeted as Root Biological Cause of Several Childhood Psychiatric Disorders

A new research discovery has the potential to revolutionize the biological understanding of some childhood psychiatric disorders. Specifically, scientists have found that when a single protein involved in brain development, called "SRGAP3," is malformed, it causes problems in the brain functioning of mice that cause symptoms that are similar to some mental health and neurological disorders in children. Because this protein has similar functions in humans, it may represent a "missing link" for several disorders that are part of an illness spectrum. In addition, it offers researchers a new target for the development of treatments that can correct the biological cause rather than treat the symptoms. To read more, click here


AASEP Logo

NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

Fewer U.S. Kids Dying of Diabetes: CDC

Fewer U.S. children and teens are dying from diabetes, according to federal health officials. The overall death rate in this group fell from 2.69 per million in 1968-1969 to 1.05 per million in 2008-2009. Possible reasons for the 61 percent decrease include improved diabetes care and treatment. Another possible factor: increased awareness of diabetes symptoms, which can lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment of new cases, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention researchers said in an agency news release. The decline in diabetes-related deaths was greater among children younger than 10 than among older children, the investigators found. Younger children had a 78 percent decrease -- from 1.80 to 0.39 deaths per million. Children and teens aged 10 to 19 years had a 52 percent decrease: from 3.56 to 1.71 per million. To read more, click here


Guidelines Developed for Extremely Premature Infants Shown to Be Life-Changing

For the last decade, prematurity has been the leading cause of infant mortality in the United States. As a result of prematurity many infants enter this world too early with a small chance of survival. In order to help treat these extremely premature infants, physicians at Nationwide Children's Hospital developed a set of guidelines tailored to meet the needs of these tiny infants, some born up to four months early. Now, a new study shows that these guidelines are not only improving survival rates for extremely premature infants, but also improving their quality of life. To read more, click here


Did You Know That....

Meningitis may develop in response to a number of causes, usually bacteria or viruses, but meningitis can also be caused by physical injury, cancer or certain drugs.

Poor Reading Skills Linked to Teen Pregnancy Risk

Preteen girls' reading skills can strongly predict whether they'll get pregnant when they're teens, a new study suggests. University of Pennsylvania researchers looked at the reading skills of more than 12,000 girls when they were in grade 7 (average age 11.9 years) in Philadelphia public schools and then checked to see how many of them gave birth when they were teens. Girls with below-average reading skills in grade 7 were 2.5 times more likely to have a child during their teenage years than those with average reading skills, the investigators found. Among preteen girls with below-average reading skills, 21 percent had one baby and 3 percent had two or more babies during their teens, compared with 12 percent and 1 percent, respectively, of girls with average reading skills, and 5 percent and 0.4 percent, respectively, of those with above-average reading skills. To read more, click here


NASET Sponsor - Cal Poly Pomona

Cal_Poly_Pomona-8-12

To learn more - Click here


NASET Sponsor - Arkansas State University

ASU_to_12-3-12

To learn more - Click here


TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Guess the answer to this week's trivia question and we'll recognize you in next week's Week in Review.
Congratulations to: Olumide Akerele, Cynthia Calanog, Stephanie Easler, Karen Bornholm, Lala Sangalang, Jessica L. Ulmer, Ope-Oluwa Olubela, Jen Emory, Pamela R. Downing-Hosten,

Lois Nembhard,  Lisa Bohannan, Ted Kurtz, Alexandra Pirard, Marlene Barnett, Marilyn Haile, Shatika Morris, PJ Williams, Cheri Mclean, Craig Pate, Pattie Komons, Catherine Cardenas, and Lauran Ziegler who all knew the answer to last wee's trivia question: If a child should need to receive special education services due to the impact of a concussion, he or she would be under the TBI (Traumatic Brain Injury) IDEIA classification.

 


THIS WEEK'S TRIVIA QUESTION:
Bacterial, Viral, Fungal, Parasitic, and Non-Infectious are the five types of what disease?

If you know the answer, send an email to contactus@naset.org
All answers must be submitted no later than Monday, November 12, 2012 at 12:00 p.m.

Bullying Has Long-Term Health Consequences

Childhood bullying can lead to long term health consequences, including general and mental health issues, behavioral problems, eating disorders, smoking, alcohol use, and homelessness, a study by the Crime Victims' Institute at Sam Houston State University found. "What is apparent from these results is that bullying victimization that occurs early in life may have significant and substantial consequences for those victims later in life," said Leana Bouffard, Director of the Crime Victims' Institute. "Thus, the adverse health consequences of victimization are much more far-reaching than just immediate injury or trauma. Understanding these long term consequences is important to assessing the true toll of crime on its victims and on society as well as responding to victims more effectively." To read more, click here


AASEP Logo

NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

Crohn's Disease in Children May Start From Bacteria

Certain types of bacteria may cause and maintain Crohn's disease, according to a new study.

Crohn's causes inflammation of the digestive system. Symptoms include abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, joint pain, skin problems, fever and bleeding from the rectum. In this study, researchers found that 19 children newly diagnosed with Crohn's disease had different levels of a group of bacteria called proteobacteria, which include E. coli and Campylobacter concisus. The researchers also checked bacteria levels in 21 healthy children. Patients with mild Crohn's had higher levels of proteobacteria in their intestinal tracts than those with moderate to severe disease and children without Crohn's disease. This suggests that these types of bacteria may play a role in causing the disease, said study principal investigator Hazel Mitchell of the University of New South Wales, in Australia. To read more, click here


Videos Reduce Children's Anxiety Prior to Surgery

Research by Dalhousie University student Katherine Mifflin has found that having children watch a video immediately prior to surgery can reduce their anxiety during anesthesia induction, the most stressful time for children throughout the perioperative process. Up to 50% of children display significant distress at the point of inhaled induction and separation from parents, fear, or exposure to a foreign environment may cause children to display high levels of distress during this time. Consequentially, children who experience high levels of distress at anesthesia induction may have more pain during recovery, longer hospital stays, and more negative behavior changes after surgery. To read more, click here


Liberty Mutual Savings

NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Group Savings Plus from Liberty Mutual

As a member of NASET you qualify for a special group discount* on your auto, home, and renter's insurance through Group Savings Plus® from Liberty Mutual. This unique program allows you to purchase high-quality auto, home and renters insurance at low group rates.

 

See for yourself how much money you could save with Liberty Mutual compared to your current insurance provider. For a free, no-obligation quote, call 800-524-9400 or visit

www.libertymutual.com/naset, or visit your local sales office.

*Group discounts, other discounts, and credits are available where state laws and regulations allow, and may vary by state.  Certain discounts apply to specific coverage only.  To the extent permitted by law, applicants are individually underwritten; not all applicants may qualify.  Coverage provided and underwritten by Liberty Mutual Insurance Company and its affiliates, 175 Berkeley Street, Boston, MA.


Gene May Be Tied to Both Smoking and ADHD, Study Suggests

Smoking and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) share a common genetic risk factor, and childhood ADHD may increase the likelihood of smoking later in life, a new study suggests. People with ADHD are more likely to start smoking early and to smoke twice as much as those without ADHD, the researchers noted. For the new study, the investigators took blood samples from more than 450 children with ADHD, aged 6 to 12, and their siblings and parents. The samples were tested for five genetic variations strongly associated with different aspects of smoking, such as the number of cigarettes smoked every day, and taking up and quitting smoking. The researchers also asked the mothers about their smoking habits during pregnancy. To read more, click here


Boys Are More Likely Than Girls to Abuse Over-The-Counter Drugs

As crackdowns get tougher on alcohol, tobacco sales, and illicit drugs, there's a growing trend among youth to turn to another source to get a high: their parent's medicine cabinet. A new University of Cincinnati study suggests adolescent males are at a higher risk of reporting longtime use of over-the-counter drugs, compared with their female peers. Early results of the study by Rebecca Vidourek, a UC assistant professor of health promotion, and Keith King, a University of Cincinnati professor of health promotion, will be presented on Oct. 29, at the 140th annual meeting of the American Public Health Association in San Francisco. To read more, click here


Autism Tough to Spot Before 6 Months of Age, Study Suggests

The development of 6-month-old babies who are diagnosed with autism in toddlerhood is very similar to that of children without autism, a new study suggests. "We always thought that if a child had autism, we would be able to tell during infancy . . . but we were wrong," said study author Rebecca Landa, director of the Center for Autism and Related Disorders at Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore. "At 6 months of age, babies who end up with autism by age 3 are scoring similarly on tests to children who didn't have autism." The study also sheds doubt on the notion that cases of autism that are spotted early are necessarily more severe. The researchers report that youngsters with early-identified autism (spotted at or before 14 months of age) did initially perform less well than a group whose autism was identified later. However, by the time children from both of these groups reached 3 years of age the gap narrowed so that they showed very similar levels of function. To read more, click here


Genetic Basis of Cardiac, Craniofacial Birth Defects Identified

A group of researchers in Israel, the United States and other nations have made important advances in the rapidly-expanding field of "regenerative medicine," outlining for the first time connections in genetic regulation that normally prevent birth defects in heart and facial muscles. Some of these problems are surprisingly common -- about 1 percent of all people have a congenital heart defect. This basic research will provide a road map to ultimately allow scientists to grow the cell types needed to repair such defects, from stem cells that can be generated from a person's own body. To read more, click here


Did You Know That....

The severity of illness and the treatment for meningitis differ depending on the cause. Thus, it is important to know the specific cause of meningitis.

Insights Into New Therapy for Rare Form of Cystic Fibrosis

Scientists at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto have established that a drug recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat a rare form of cystic fibrosis works in an unconventional way. Their results reveal new possibilities for treating various forms of cystic fibrosis. Cystic fibrosis is an inherited disease afflicting about 70,000 people around the world. Cystic fibrosis patients carry a defective gene that disables or destroys its protein product, which normally regulates the transport of ions across cell borders. When that transport is disrupted, the viscosity of the mucus coating certain organs becomes too thick. A characteristic feature of the disease is thick mucus buildup in the air passages, which causes difficulty breathing and recurring infections. To read more, click here


Early Autism Intervention Improves Brain Responses to Social Cues

An autism intervention program that emphasizes social interactions and is designed for children as young as 12 months has been found to improve cognitive skills and brain responses to faces, considered a building block for social skills. The researchers say that the study, which was completed at the University of Washington, is the first to demonstrate that an intensive behavioral intervention can change brain function in toddlers with autism spectrum disorders. "So much of a toddler's learning involves social interaction, and early intervention that promotes attention to people and social cues may pay dividends in promoting the normal development of the brain and behavior," said Geraldine Dawson, lead author and chief science officer for the advocacy group Autism Speaks. To read more, click here


Homelessness, Frequent Moves Affect How Kids Do in School

Children who are homeless or move frequently do worse in certain school subjects than children who have more stable home settings, according to a new study. About 1 million children in the United States are homeless and many more are believed to move frequently, according to the researchers, who looked at more than 26,000 public school students in Minneapolis. Overall, children who were homeless at some time during the six-year study or moved often (three or more moves in a year) had consistently lower math and reading skills in elementary and middle school than other students. To read more, click here


Food For Thought..........

It's not that I'm so smart, it's just that I stay with problems longer.

Albert Einstein

lost password?

Publications