Week in Review - November 2, 2012

WEEK IN REVIEW

New NASET Publications and Articles of Interest in Special Education and Disabilities That Were Reported This Week

November 2, 2012 - Vol 8, Issue 41

 

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In This Issue

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

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Dear NASET News,

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW Here, we provide you with the latest publications from NASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW at news@naset.org.Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,


NASET News Team

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New This Week on NASET

NASET's LD Report

Learning Disability Identification: What You Need to Know about the Discrepancy and Patterns of Strengths and Weaknesses ("Third Method") Models.

By Joyce Reynolds-Ward, M.S.

 

Reprinted with permission from Doug Goldberg at The Special Education Advisor (http://www.specialeducationadvisor.com/learning-disability-identification-discrepancy-model-patterns-strength-weaknesses/)

 

The special education process for identifying a student with specific learning disabilities is one of the greatest challenges the parent of a child with specific learning disabilities can face.  Not only do you need to understand how your district defines/identifies what a specific learning disability is, but you need to know how your child qualifies for special education services under their definition.  This challenge arises because we do not have a hard and fast definition of a specific learning disability.  You as a parent see that your child is not performing well in school.  It would seem to be cut and dried that your child has a specific learning disability of some sort or another.  However, there are many factors involved with identifying a learning disability, and not all academic problems are caused by a specific learning disability. Written by Joyce Reynolds-Ward, M.S. (and reprinted with permission from Doug Goldberg at The Special Education Advisor (www.SpecialEducationAdvisor.com).  This issue of NASET's LD Report will focus on LD identification and what teachers and parents need to know about the discrepancy and patterns of strengths and weaknesses ("third method") models.



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Exercise Boosts School Performance for Kids With ADHD: Study

A few minutes of exercise a day can help children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) do better at school, according to a small new study. The findings suggest that exercise could provide an alternative to drug treatment. While drugs have proven largely effective in treating children with ADHD, many parents and doctors are concerned about the medications' side effects and costs. The study included 20 children with ADHD and 20 children without the disorder, ages 8 to 10, who for 20 minutes either walked briskly on a treadmill or sat and read. The children then completed a short reading comprehension and math test, and also played a computer game that assessed their ability to ignore distractions and focus on their goal. To read more, click here

Did You Know That....

IDEIA requires that transition planning start by the time the student reaches age 16.

Autism Early Intervention Found to Normalize Brain Activity in Children as Young as 18 Months

An intensive early intervention therapy that is effective for improving cognition and language skills among very young children with autism also normalizes their brain activity, decreases their autism symptoms and improves their social skills, a nationwide study has found. The researchers said the study is the first to demonstrate that an autism early intervention program can normalize brain activity. "We know that infant brains are quite malleable and previously demonstrated that this therapy capitalizes on the potential of learning that an infant brain has in order to limit autism's deleterious effects," said study author Sally Rogers, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and a researcher with the UC Davis MIND Institute. To read more, click here

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NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

Not All Juvenile Arthritis Is the Same

Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SJIA) is currently classified as a subtype of juvenile idiopathic arthritis but with the addition of systemic inflammation often resulting in fever, rash and serositis. New research published in BioMed Central's open access journal BMC Medicine shows that the arthritic and systemic components of SJIA are related, but that the inflammatory pathways involved in SJIA are different from those in the more common polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (POLY). Of particular interest, distinct pathways involved in the arthritis of early and established SJIA raise the possibility that the immune system alters its behaviour over the course of this disease. To read more, click here

Sickle Cell Anemia: Maps and Newborn Estimates Released

In 2010 around 300,000 babies were born with sickle cell anemia, a serious blood disorder which can be fatal if untreated, and 5.5 million newborns inherited the sickle cell gene, a new study suggests. Whilst the 5.5 million who only inherit the gene will usually not present any clinical complications, these individuals could still pass this gene on to their offspring and give birth to babies suffering from sickle cell anemia. Accurate estimates of the numbers and geographical distribution of those affected is vital for effective prevention and treatment policies to be put in place.To read more, click here

Did You Know That....

In transition planning, the IEP team considers areas such as postsecondary education or vocational training, employment, independent living, and community participation.

Fertility Treatments May Raise Risk for Birth Defects

Couples who undergo in vitro fertilization to try to have a baby are more likely to have an infant born with a birth defect, new research indicates. It's still unclear why, though, experts say. "Our findings included a significant association between the use of assisted reproductive technology, such as certain types of in vitro fertilization, and an increased risk of birth defects," said study author Dr. Lorraine Kelley-Quon, a general surgery resident at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, in Los Angeles, who conducted the research while at Mattel Children's Hospital UCLA. The findings were to be presented Saturday at the American Academy of Pediatrics annual meeting in New Orleans. To read more, click here

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TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Guess the answer to this week's trivia question and we'll recognize you in next week's Week in Review.
Congratulations to:

Jessica L. Ulmer, Olumide Akerele, Alexandra Pirard, Ope-Oluwa Olubela, and Elaine Draper who all knew that according to a recent study of children, low-level prenatal mercury exposure may be associated with a greater risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-related behaviors and that fish consumption during pregnancy may be associated with a lower risk of these behaviors.

 

THIS WEEK'S TRIVIA QUESTION:
Lately, it seems as if we are seeing more and more children getting concussions through sports related injuries. If a child should need to receive special education services due to the impact of a concussion, under what IDEIA classification would this fall under?

If you know the answer, send an email to contactus@naset.org
All answers must be submitted no later than Monday, November 5, 2012 at 12:00 p.m.

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New Tools Developed to Better Treat ADHD Patients in Early Stages

Mayo Clinic researchers are presenting new findings on the early treatment of child and adolescent attention deficit hyperactivity disorder this week at the American Academy of Childhood and Adolescent Psychiatry annual meeting in San Francisco. They include a method to get better input from parents and teachers of children who are being diagnosed with ADHD for the first time -- allowing for more effective treatment upon the first consultation. Researchers also showed how a tool can help clinicians better diagnose and treat children who have both ADHD and oppositional defiance disorder. To read more, click here

AASEP Logo

NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

Swallowing Nasal Sprays, Eye Drops Can Harm Kids, FDA Warns

Over-the-counter eye drops or nasal decongestant sprays can pose a serious health threat to children who swallow them and should be kept out of the reach of kids at all times, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns. These products -- sold under brand names such as Visine, Dristan and Mucinex, as well as generic and store brands -- contain active ingredients called imidazoline derivatives. "Children who swallow even miniscule amounts of these products can have serious adverse effects," FDA pharmacist Yelena Maslov said in an agency news release. To read more, click here

Stem Cell Therapies for Multiple Sclerosis, Other Myelin Disorders Expected Soon

When the era of regenerative medicine dawned more than three decades ago, the potential to replenish populations of cells destroyed by disease was seen by many as the next medical revolution. However, what followed turned out not to be a sprint to the clinic, but rather a long tedious slog carried out in labs across the globe required to master the complexity of stem cells and then pair their capabilities and attributes with specific diseases. In a review article appearing October 25 in the journal Science, University of Rochester Medical Center scientists Steve Goldman, M.D., Ph.D., Maiken Nedergaard, Ph.D., and Martha Windrem, Ph.D., contend that researchers are now on the threshold of human application of stem cell therapies for a class of neurological diseases known as myelin disorders -- a long list of diseases that include conditions such as multiple sclerosis, white matter stroke, cerebral palsy, certain dementias, and rare but fatal childhood disorders called pediatric leukodystrophies. To read more, click here

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NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

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As a member of NASET you qualify for a special group discount* on your auto, home, and renter's insurance through Group Savings Plus® from Liberty Mutual. This unique program allows you to purchase high-quality auto, home and renters insurance at low group rates.

 

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*Group discounts, other discounts, and credits are available where state laws and regulations allow, and may vary by state.  Certain discounts apply to specific coverage only.  To the extent permitted by law, applicants are individually underwritten; not all applicants may qualify.  Coverage provided and underwritten by Liberty Mutual Insurance Company and its affiliates, 175 Berkeley Street, Boston, MA.

Staying Home With Sick Kids Causes Job Worries for Parents: Survey

One-third of U.S. parents say they worry about losing pay or their jobs when they stay at home to care for sick children who can't attend child care, a new survey finds. Many child care providers have rules that require children to stay home if they're sick. The impact that such policies have on millions of working parents was assessed in the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health. The survey included 310 parents with children younger than 6 years old in child care. Nearly two-thirds of the parents said their children could not attend child care at some point in the past year due to illness. To read more,click here

Video Game With Biofeedback Teaches Children to Curb Their Anger

Children with serious anger problems can be helped by a simple video game that hones their ability to regulate their emotions, finds a pilot study at Boston Children's Hospital. Results were published online October 24 in the journal Adolescent Psychiatry. Noticing that children with anger control problems are often uninterested in psychotherapy, but very eager to play video games, Jason Kahn, PhD, and Joseph Gonzalez-Heydrich, MD, at Boston Children's Hospital developed "RAGE Control" to motivate children to practice emotional control skills that they can later use in challenging life situations. The fast-paced game involves shooting at enemy spaceships while avoiding shooting at friendly ones. As children play, a monitor on one finger tracks their heart rate and displays it on the computer screen. When heart rate goes above a certain level, players lose their ability to shoot at the enemy spaceships. To improve their game, they must learn to keep calm. To read more, click here

Many High School Football Players Ignore Signs of Concussion

A new survey of high school football players finds that more than half of those who felt some of the common symptoms of a concussion over the past two years didn't report them because they were afraid of being banned from playing. More than half of the 134 athletes surveyed said they'd learned more about the symptoms of concussion after getting to high school. But even though concussions can lead to problems such as brain swelling and bleeding, less than 40 percent were worried about the long-term effects of concussions. "The good news is that kids are paying attention and have gotten some increased knowledge," said survey author Dr. Michael Israel, a resident at the department of pediatrics at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. "But they also know that due to state rules, if they have certain symptoms they have to go through a certain protocol to get back to play. Some of them are potentially hiding their symptoms to avoid being pulled." To read more, click here

New Vitamin-Based Treatment That Could Reduce Muscle Degeneration in Muscular Dystrophy

Boosting the activity of a vitamin-sensitive cell adhesion pathway has the potential to counteract the muscle degeneration and reduced mobility caused by muscular dystrophies, according to a research team led by scientists at the University of Maine. The discovery, published 23 October in the open access journal PLOS Biology, is particularly important for congenital muscular dystrophies, which are progressive, debilitating and often lethal diseases that currently remain without cure. The researchers found that they could improve muscle structure and function in a zebrafish version of muscular dystrophy by supplying a common cellular chemical (or its precursor, vitamin B3) to activate a cell adhesion pathway. To read more, click here

Did You Know That....

The student must be invited to any IEP meeting where postsecondary goals and transition services needed to reach those goals will be considered.

More Evidence Links Bullying, Abuse to Suicidal Thoughts in Youth

Children who are picked on by their peers or are abused or mistreated in other areas of their lives are more likely to think about killing themselves, a new study reveals. And the more areas of their lives in which they are victimized, the higher their risk. The new findings, which appear online Oct. 22 in the journal Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, provide a disturbing snapshot of the consequences of bullying and other forms of youth victimization. In the study of nearly 1,200 children and adolescents (aged 10 to 17), 4.3 percent said they had experienced suicidal thoughts -- known as suicidal ideation -- within the month before they were interviewed by researchers. When compared to participants who were not victimized at all, those who were bullied by peers were more than twice as likely to think about killing themselves in the past year. To read more, click here

Are Schizophrenia and Autism Close Relations?

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), a category that includes autism, Asperger Syndrome, and Pervasive Developmental Disorder, are characterized by difficulty with social interaction and communication, or repetitive behaviors. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Management says that one in 88 children in the US is somewhere on the Autism spectrum -- an alarming ten-fold increase in the last four decades. New research by Dr. Mark Weiser of Tel Aviv University's Sackler Faculty of Medicine and the Sheba Medical Center has revealed that ASD appears share a root cause with other mental illnesses, including schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. At first glance, schizophrenia and autism may look like completely different illnesses, he says. But closer inspection reveals many common traits, including social and cognitive dysfunction and a decreased ability to lead normal lives and function in the real world. To read more, click here

Bullying May Be Linked to Mental Disorders

Children with mental health disorders are more likely than other kids to be bullies, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed data from children ages 6 to 17 included in the 2007 U.S. National Survey of Children's Health and found that more than 15 percent were identified as bullies by a parent or guardian, and that children with mental health disorders were three times more likely than their peers to bully other children. The researchers also focused on the link between specific mental health disorders and bullying. Depression was associated with a three-fold increased risk of being a bully, while a diagnosis of oppositional defiant disorder increased the risk six times. To read more, click here

Food For Thought..........

Few will have the greatness to bend history itself; but each of us can work to change a small portion of events, and in the total; of all those acts will be written the history of this generation.

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