Week in Review - July 13, 2012

WEEK IN REVIEW

New NASET Publications and Articles of Interest in Special Education and Disabilities That Were Reported This Week

July 13, 2012 - Vol 8, Issue 26


 

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In This Issue

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

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Dear NASET News,

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW Here, we provide you with the latest publications from NASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW atnews@naset.org. Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,


NASET News Team

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New This Week on NASET

Classroom Management Series VIII

Part II- Negative Teacher Characteristics

More and more, teachers are becoming a primary influence in children's lives, and in some cases they may be the only healthy adults some children encounter during the day. Twenty five years ago family structures were different, and teachers did not require the depth and variety of social/emotional skills that are required of today's teachers. Teachers today are not only educators, but therapists, parent substitutes, mentors, advocates, and more.

Therefore, it stands to reason that a teacher's personality and teaching style can have a profound impact on children's academic performance and general development. The importance of teaching style in creating a positive environment in which student confidence is fostered is the discussion of this series. It will be very important to step back and evaluate how you are defined as a teacher, your goals in teaching, and the manner in which you present yourself to students. Does your teaching style allow for an environment where confidence, security, performance and well being can really be reinforced or an environment that may actually impede the these and other factors in children?

No single aspect of a teacher's personality may be responsible for improving or impeding the growth of confidence in a student. For example, a very strict teacher who is fair, kind, genuine, logical, and nurturing may facilitate the growth of self confidence and well being despite being very strict. On the other hand, a teacher who is funny but unstructured and disorganized may not facilitate children's self confidence or enhance performance. Despite the fact that the children love the teacher, they may not gain confidence or academic growth if the teacher cannot provide the real-life success experiences necessary for the growth of self confidence, academic performance, security and personal growth.



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Lesser Known Disorders in Special Education

July 2012

In this issue you will see:

*             LD 12.10-Visual Pursuit and Tracking Disorder

*             OHI 14.01 Acromegaly

*             HI 1.02-Pure word deafness



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Family History of Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder May Up Kids' Risk for Autism

A new study suggests that children whose parents or siblings have schizophrenia or bipolar disorder may be at a higher risk of developing autism spectrum disorders. Researchers led by Dr. Patrick Sullivan of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill came to their conclusions after studying the medical records of people in Sweden and Israel. A family history of schizophrenia was strongly connected to autism disorders in children, almost tripling the risk, the team found. Children with a first-degree relative with bipolar disorder also had higher odds of developing an autism disorder, but the effect was less pronounced. It's not clear how schizophrenia and bipolar disorder might be connected to autism disorders. The research didn't prove that either of these psychiatric disorders actually causes autism, only that there is an association. To read more, click here

Did You Know That....

The Assistive Technology Act is intended to promote people's awareness of, and access to, assistive technology  (AT) devices and services. The Act seeks to provide AT to persons with disabilities, so they can more fully participate in education, employment, and daily activities on a level playing field with other members of their communities. The Act covers people with disabilities of all ages, all disabilities, in all environments (early intervention, K-12, post-secondary, vocational rehabilitation, community living, aging services, etc.)

Child Diabetes Levels Almost Four Times Higher in China Than in US

A study led by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill found Chinese teenagers have a rate of diabetes nearly four times greater than their counterparts in the United States. The rise in the incidence of diabetes parallels increases in cardiovascular risk, researchers say, and is the result of a Chinese population that is growing increasingly overweight. The study led by Barry Popkin, Ph.D., W.R. Kenan Jr. Distinguished Professor of nutrition at UNC's Gillings School of Global Public Health, and Chinese researchers, used data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS), the longest ongoing study of its kind in China. Between 1989 and 2011, the study followed more than 29,000 people in 300 communities throughout China, with surveys conducted in 1989, 1991, 1993, 1997, 2000, 2004, 2006, 2009 and 2011. The CHNS project was a joint undertaking by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Chinese Center for Disease Control (CCDC) National Institute of Nutrition and Food Safety. To read more, click here

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NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

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*Group discounts, other discounts, and credits are available where state laws and regulations allow, and may vary by state.  Certain discounts apply to specific coverage only.  To the extent permitted by law, applicants are individually underwritten; not all applicants may qualify.  Coverage provided and underwritten by Liberty Mutual Insurance Company and its affiliates, 175 Berkeley Street, Boston, MA.

Botox May Ease Tremors in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

The drug Botox, best known for paralyzing muscles in the forehead to reduce wrinkles, can also relieve shaking in the limbs of patients with multiple sclerosis, a small new study suggests. The treatment, which requires several times the amount of Botox (botulinum toxin type A) used for wrinkles, could be expensive and it's not yet approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for this use. However, multiple sclerosis (MS) patients can still legally get the treatment in the United States. "Most patients tolerate the injections very well and are keen to continue the treatment once they see the benefits they get from it," said Dr. Anneke van der Walt, lead study author and a neurologist and research fellow at the Royal Melbourne Hospital, in Australia. To read more, click here

Gene Linked to Facial, Skull and Cognitive Impairment Identified

A gene whose mutation results in malformed faces and skulls as well as mental retardation has been found by scientists. They looked at patients with Potocki-Shaffer syndrome, a rare disorder that can result in significant abnormalities such as a small head and chin and intellectual disability, and found the gene PHF21A was mutated, said Dr. Hyung-Goo Kim, molecular geneticist at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Health Sciences University. The scientists confirmed PHF21A's role by suppressing it in zebrafish, which developed head and brain abnormalities similar to those in patients. "With less PHF21A, brain cells died, so this gene must play a big role in neuron survival," said Kim, lead and corresponding author of the study published in The American Journal of Human Genetics. They reconfirmed the role by giving the gene back to the malformed fish -- studied for their adeptness at regeneration -- which then became essentially normal. They also documented the gene's presence in the craniofacial area of normal mice. To read more, click here

Did You Know That....

The Assistive Technology Act of 2004 defines an assistive technology device in the following way:  ...any item, piece of equipment, or product system, whether acquired commercially, modified, or customized, that is used to increase, maintain, or improve functional capabilities of individuals with disabilities.

Spanking Batters Kids' Mental Health: Study

Spanking or slapping your children may increase the odds that they will develop mental health issues that plague them in adulthood, a new study suggests. Researchers in Canada found that up to 7 percent of a range of mental health disorders were associated with physical punishment, including spanking, shoving, grabbing or hitting, during childhood. "We're not talking about just a tap on the bum," said study author Tracie Afifi, an assistant professor in the department of community health sciences at the University of Manitoba, in Winnipeg. "We were looking at people who used physical punishment as a regular means to discipline their children." To read more, click here

NASET Sponsor - Arkansas State University

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TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Guess the answer to this week's trivia question and we'll recognize you in next week's Week in Review.
Congratulations to: Rita Miller, Alexandra Pirard, Francine L.S. Hamel, Olumide Akerele,

Heather Shyrer, Ma. Cynthia B. Calanog, Laurine Kennedy, Elaine Draper, Lisa Keneally, Prahbhjot Malhi,

MarleneBarnett, Tina Theuerkauf, and Jessica L. Ulmer who all knew that the answer to last week's trivia question was:
Children exposed to HIV in the womb are more likely to experience HEARING LOSS by age 16.

THE TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK IS ON HIATUS BUT WILL BE RETURNING ON AUGUST 3, 2012

Music to My Eyes: Device Converting Images Into Music Helps Visually Impaired Find Things With Ease

Sensory substitution devices (SSDs) use sound or touch to help the visually impaired perceive the visual scene surrounding them. The ideal SSD would assist not only in sensing the environment but also in performing daily activities based on this input. For example, accurately reaching for a coffee cup, or shaking a friend's hand. In a new study, scientists trained blindfolded sighted participants to perform fast and accurate movements using a new SSD, called EyeMusic. Their results are published in the July issue of Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience. The EyeMusic, developed by a team of researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, employs pleasant musical tones and scales to help the visually impaired "see" using music. This non-invasive SSD converts images into a combination of musical notes, or "soundscapes." To read more, click here

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NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

Kids Born Even a Little Early Have Lower School Scores: Study

Babies born on the early side of full-term may have higher odds of academic delays than those delivered a week or two later, new research finds. Experts aren't sure what exactly causes the achievement lag, evident in third grade. "Perhaps there is something about the uterine environment that supports brain development in a favorable way in the last month of pregnancy and perhaps gets disrupted by earlier birth," said study leader Kimberly Noble, assistant professor of pediatrics at Columbia University Medical Center and New York Presbyterian Hospital in New York City. To read more, click here

Developing World Has Less Than 5% Chance of Meeting UN Child Hunger Target, Study Estimates

Insufficient progress has been made in most developing countries to meet the United Nations' target of halving the proportion of children who suffer from hunger by 2015 compared with 1990 levels, according to a systematic analysis of data on children's height and weight, published July 5 in the Lancet. Although the nutritional status of children under five has improved overall since 1985, one in five infants and children in developing countries is still moderately or severely underweight, amounting to an estimated 110 million children worldwide. Another 148 million are mildly underweight. The UN set the target as part of its Millennium Development Goals. This new analysis, led by Professor Majid Ezzati from the School of Public Health at Imperial College London, estimates that while 61 out of the 141 developing countries studied are likely to meet this target, the developing world as a whole has less than a 5% chance of succeeding. Progress has been uneven between regions, with Asia and Latin America making the strongest improvements and sub-Saharan Africa falling behind. To read more, click here

Why Smoking Is 'BAD' for the Fallopian Tube, and Increases the Risk of Ectopic Pregnancy

Cigarette smoke reduces the production of a Fallopian tube gene known as "BAD," which helps explain the link between smoking and ectopic pregnancy. The finding, from scientists led by Drs Andrew Horne and Colin Duncan at the Medical Research Council (MRC) Centre for Reproductive Health in Edinburgh, UK, was described July 3 at the annual meting of ESHRE (European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology) in Istanbul. Ectopic pregnancy -- when the embryo implants outside the uterus and in the Fallopian tube -- occurs in up to 2% of all pregnancies and is the most common cause of maternal death in early pregnancy. There is currently no way to prevent an ectopic pregnancy, and the condition must be treated by abdominal surgery or, when the ectopic is small and stable, by injection of a drug called methotrexate. To read more, click here

Exposure to Violence Has Long-Term Stress Effects Among Adolescents

Children who are exposed to community violence continue to exhibit a physical stress response up to a year after the exposure, suggesting that exposure to violence may have long-term negative health consequences, according researchers at Penn State and University College London. "We know that exposure to violence is linked with aggression, depression, post-traumatic stress symptoms and academic and cognitive difficulties in the short term, but little is known about the long-term effects of such exposure," said Elizabeth Susman, Jean Phillips Shibley Professor of Biobehavioral Health, Penn State. "Our data show that the stress reaction to violence exposure is not just immediate. There's an effect that endures." To read more, click here

A High Intake of Certain Dietary Fats Associated With Lower Live Birth Rates in IVF

Women with a higher intake of dietary saturated fats have fewer mature oocytes available for collection in IVF, according to results of a study from the Harvard School of Public Health funded by the US National Institutes of Health. The study investigated the effect of dietary fat (classified as total, saturated, monounsaturated, polyunsaturated, omega 6, omega 3 and trans) on a range of preclinical and clinical outcomes in women having IVF. Results showed that the intake of saturated fat was inversely related to the number of mature oocytes retrieved, while polyunsaturated fat consumption was inversely associated with early embryo quality. Dietary fat intake has been previously studied for its effect on reproductive health; for example, a high intake of trans-fats has been associated with ovulatory infertility (as in polycystic ovary syndrome) and miscarriage, while saturated fats have been related to lower sperm concentrations. But so far little has been known about the effect of dietary fat intake on the outcome of fertility treatment. To read more, click here

Molecular Clues to Link Between Childhood Maltreatment and Later Suicide

Exposure to childhood maltreatment increases the risk for most psychiatric disorders as well as many negative consequences of these conditions. This new study, by Dr. Gustavo Turecki and colleagues at McGill University, Canada, provides important insight into one of the most extreme outcomes, suicide. "In this study, we expanded our previous work on the epigenetic regulation of the glucocorticoid receptor gene by investigating the impact of severe early-life adversity on DNA methylation," explained Dr. Turecki. The glucocorticoid receptor is important because it is a brain target for the stress hormone cortisol. To read more, click here

Did You Know That....

Under the law, each U.S. state and territory receives a grant to fund an Assistive Technology Act Project (ATAP). These projects provide services to persons with disabilities for their entire life span, as well as to their families or guardians, service providers, and agencies and other entities that are involved in providing services such as education and employment to persons with disabilities.

Dangerous Rage May Be Common Among U.S. Teens

Almost two-thirds of U.S. teens have had an anger attack so severe they have destroyed property, or threatened or attacked another person, a new study finds.When these attacks persist, the syndrome can be considered intermittent explosive disorder. One in 12 U.S. teens may have the condition, which usually surfaces in late childhood, the researchers say. "This is one of the most common adolescent disorders in America, and the most important ignored disorder among youth in America," said lead researcher Ronald Kessler, a professor of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School in Boston. To read more, click here

Childhood Adversity Increases Risk for Depression and Chronic Inflammation

When a person injures their knee, it becomes inflamed. When a person has a cold, their throat becomes inflamed. This type of inflammation is the body's natural and protective response to injury. Interestingly, there is growing evidence that a similar process happens when a person experiences psychological trauma. Unfortunately, this type of inflammation can be destructive. Previous studies have linked depression and inflammation, particularly in individuals who have experienced early childhood adversity, but overall, findings have been inconsistent. Researchers Gregory Miller and Steve Cole designed a longitudinal study in an effort to resolve these discrepancies, and their findings are now published in a study in Biological Psychiatry. To read more, click here

Food For Thought..........

Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or present are certain to miss the future.

John  F. Kennedy

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