Week in Review - June 29, 2012

WEEK IN REVIEW

New NASET Publications and Articles of Interest in Special Education and Disabilities That Were Reported This Week

June 29, 2012 - Vol 8, Issue 24

 

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TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

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Dear NASET News,

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW Here, we provide you with the latest publications from NASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW atnews@naset.org. Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,


NASET News Team

NASET Sponsor - Arkansas State University

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New This Week on NASET

Assessment in Special Education Series

Part 11-What is Curriculum-Based Measurement and What Does It Mean to a Child?

Kathleen McLane

 

Curriculum-Based Measurement (CBM) is a method teachers use to find out how students are progressing in basic academic areas such as math, reading, writing, and spelling.  CBM can be helpful to parents because it provides current, week-by-week information on the progress their children are making.  When a child's teacher uses CBM, he or she finds out how well the child is progressing in learning the content for the academic year.  CBM also monitors the success of the instruction a child is receiving - if a child's performance is not meeting expectations, the teacher then changes the way of teaching the child to try to find the type and amount of instruction the child needs to make sufficient progress toward meeting the academic goals. This issue of NASET's Assessment in Special Education series will focus on the importance of Curriculum-Based Measurement.  It was written by Kathleen McLane and developed through Cooperative Agreement (#H326W0003) between the American Institutes for Research and the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs.

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Q & A Corner #51

Preparing for Post Secondary Education
Research has established that there is a strong relationship between postsecondary education and successful employment outcomes. People with a postsecondary education are more likely to get a job and have a higher salary than people without a postsecondary education. This relationship is even stronger for people with disabilities. Individuals with disabilities have a much higher chance of achieving valued employment outcomes if they have a postsecondary education. In addition, the information and technology age has changed the job market so that more and more vocations require postsecondary education. A postsecondary education is meant to prepare students to think critically, access and develop knowledge, and acquire the skills necessary for a successful career. Postsecondary school is also a good place to develop social skills, independence, and work-related experience. This issue of NASET's Q & A Corner is excerpted from NCSET E-News, an electronic newsletter of the National Center on Secondary Education and Transition (NCSET), available online at www.ncset.org/enews. NCSET is funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs."

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June Resource Review


In this Issue you will See Topics On:
  • Behavioral Support
  • Best Practices
  • College Issues
  • Developmental Disabilities
  • Drop Outs
  • Early Intervention
  • Education and Disability
  • Employment
  • Participation Requests
  • Families and Community Issues
  • Modifications and Accommodations
  • Social and Emotional Development
  • Student's Rights
  • Special Education Law
  • Transition

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United Cerebral Palsy School Receives NASET School of Excellence Award

The United Cerebral Palsy School Program has been selected as a National Association of Special Education Teachers (NASET) 2012-2013 School of Excellence. UCP is one of 62 schools nationwide to receive the award. A ceremony was held on June 26th to honor the staff. According to Dr. Roger Pierangelo and Dr. George Giuliani, Executive Directors of NASET, "The recognition as a NASET School of Excellence is bestowed on private special education schools that have met rigorous professional criteria and have demonstrated truly exceptional dedication, commitment and achievement in the field of special education." Dr. Jim Mullins, President and CEO said "I am proud of Sue Knaperek and her staff receiving this award. But better than the recognition is the awareness that our school deserves the award by the daily commitment to the excellent support and education of our students." To read more,click here

More Vigilance Needed to Protect Kids With Food Allergies

Many young children who are allergic to milk, eggs and peanuts have serious reactions after accidental exposures caused by misread labels, cross-contact between foods or mistakes in food preparation, a new study finds. The reactions occur in spite of parents being aware of the allergies and educated about the potential seriousness of them -- a finding that experts say highlights the need for even greater vigilance to protect children from life-threatening exposures. "The rate of reaction was higher than most of us would have anticipated," said Dr. James Fagin, director of the Pediatric Asthma Center at Cohen Children's Hospital of New York, who was not involved with the research. "It tells us we are not doing a good enough job educating the families about food allergies and avoidance techniques." To read more, click here

Did You Know That....

Approximately 250,000 U.S. children aged 1-5 years have blood lead levels greater than 10 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood, the level at which CDC recommends public health actions be initiated. Lead poisoning can affect nearly every system in the body. Because lead poisoning often occurs with no obvious symptoms, it frequently goes unrecognized

Mild Thyroid Dysfunction in Early Pregnancy Linked to Serious Complications

Even moderate thyroid dysfunction during early pregnancy significantly increases the risk of serious complications, underscoring the need for universal screening in the first trimester, a new study finds. The results will be presented June 23 at The Endocrine Society's 94th Annual Meeting in Houston. "These findings add to the now increasing evidence from previous studies that all pregnant women, irrespective of their risk for thyroid problems, probably should be screened for thyroid dysfunction within the first three months of getting pregnant," said study lead author Jubbin Jagan Jacob, M.D., associate professor at Christian Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana in Punjab, India. To read more, click here

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NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Group Savings Plus from Liberty Mutual

As a member of NASET you qualify for a special group discount* on your auto, home, and renter's insurance through Group Savings Plus® from Liberty Mutual. This unique program allows you to purchase high-quality auto, home and renters insurance at low group rates.

 

See for yourself how much money you could save with Liberty Mutual compared to your current insurance provider. For a free, no-obligation quote, call 800-524-9400 or visit

www.libertymutual.com/naset, or visit your local sales office.

*Group discounts, other discounts, and credits are available where state laws and regulations allow, and may vary by state.  Certain discounts apply to specific coverage only.  To the extent permitted by law, applicants are individually underwritten; not all applicants may qualify.  Coverage provided and underwritten by Liberty Mutual Insurance Company and its affiliates, 175 Berkeley Street, Boston, MA.

Delaying ADHD Meds Could Hurt Kids' Math Scores

It's better to treat the symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) sooner rather than later to prevent a drop in performance at school, according to new research. A delay in treatment appeared to make the biggest difference in math scores, and later treatment seemed to affect girls significantly more than boys, the study indicated. "We found that earlier treatment rather than late may halt declining academic performance, especially in math, and especially for girls," said the study's lead author, Helga Zoega, a postdoctoral fellow at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City, and the Center of Public Health Sciences at the University of Iceland in Reykjavik. To read more, click here

Pregnant Women Should Avoid Alcohol During Pregnancy, Experts Say

Experts at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine disagree with a series of new studies from Denmark that suggest consumption of up to 8 alcoholic drinks a week or occasional binge drinking during pregnancy is generally safe for the developing baby. Kenneth Lyons Jones, MD, professor in the UCSD Department of Pediatrics and a renowned expert in birth defects, and Christina Chambers, MPH, PhD, director of the California Teratogen Information Service (CTIS) Pregnancy Health Information Line, say these studies are misleading to pregnant women, citing more than 30 years of research to the contrary. "This series of studies collected data on alcohol exposure during an interview conducted sometime between 7 and 39 weeks of pregnancy. The quantity and frequency of alcohol consumed was based on mother's recall which may not be accurate," said Jones who was one of the first doctors to identify Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) in 1973. To read more, click here

Did You Know That....

Lead poisoning is entirely preventable. The key is stopping children from coming into contact with lead and treating children who have been poisoned by lead.

Could Fertility Drugs Make Kids Shorter?

For those who need help getting pregnant, the thought of having a child who's a little shorter than other kids probably won't be much of a worry. But the question of whether infertility treatment causes unanticipated consequences remains fertile ground for researchers. In a study scheduled for presentation Saturday at the Endocrine Society annual meeting in Houston, researchers found full-term children conceived with fertility drugs were about one inch shorter than their peers. The researchers wanted to find out whether there was a difference in height among children whose mothers used only ovarian stimulation by fertility drugs such as Clomid (clomiphene) without in-vitro fertilization (IVF). To read more, click here

NASET Sponsor - Arkansas State University

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To learn more - Click here

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Guess the answer to this week's trivia question and we'll recognize you in next week's Week in Review.
Congratulations to: Olumide Akerele, Marlene Barnett, and Prahbhjot Malhi who all knew that 49 states have adopted school bullying laws

 

THIS WEEK'S TRIVIA QUESTION:
Diabetes is increasing among U.S. children at an alarming rate, say researchers who report jumps of more than 20 percent since 2001 for type 2 disease, which is linked to excessive weight and sedentary lifestyles, and type 1 diabetes, which is an autoimmune disease. For type 2, we have some clues as to why it's increasing, but for type 1, we still need to better understand the triggers of this disease." Many of the type 2 diagnoses are explained by the rise in overweight and obese children. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, what percent of U.S. children and teens are obese?

If you know the answer, send an email to contactus@naset.org
All answers must be submitted no later than Monday, July 2, 2012 at 12:00 p.m.

Children Exposed to HIV in the Womb at Increased Risk for Hearing Loss

Children exposed to HIV in the womb may be more likely to experience hearing loss by age 16 than are their unexposed peers, according to scientists in a National Institutes of Health research network. The researchers estimated that hearing loss affects 9 to 15 percent of HIV-infected children and 5 to 8 percent of children who did not have HIV at birth but whose mothers had HIV infection during pregnancy. Study participants ranged from 7 to 16 years old. The researchers defined hearing loss as the level at which sounds could be detected, when averaged over four frequencies important for speech understanding (500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hertz), that was 20 decibels or higher than the normal hearing level for adolescents or young adults in either ear. To read more, click here

AASEP Logo

NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here

Study Ties Kids' Allergy Risks to Antibacterials, Preservatives

Antibacterials and preservatives in products such as soap, toothpaste and mouthwash may be linked to an increased risk of allergies in children, according to a new study. Johns Hopkins Children's Center researchers used data from a U.S. national health survey of 860 children, aged 6 to 18, to examine the link between urinary levels of antibacterials and preservatives found in many personal-care products and the presence of IgE antibodies in the children's blood. IgE antibodies are part of the body's immune system. Their levels rise in response to an allergen and are elevated in people with allergies. To read more, click here

Muscular Dystrophy: MG53 Protein Is Shown to Repair Cell and Tissue Damage

Throughout the lifecycle, injury to the body's cells occurs naturally, as well as through trauma. Cells have the ability to repair and regenerate themselves, but a defect in the repair process can lead to cardiovascular, neurological, muscular or pulmonary diseases. Recent discoveries of key genes that control cell repair have advanced the often painstaking search for ways to enhance the repair process. A new study by researchers from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School reports that the protein MG53, previously shown to be the key initiator in the cell membrane repair process, has the potential to be used directly as a therapeutic approach to treating traumatic tissue damage. To read more, click here

Child's Scoliosis Stresses Patients, Parents: Study

Having to wear a body brace for the treatment of scoliosis (curved spine) causes stress for teen patients and their parents, a new study finds. But parents worry most of all. While teen girls dislike wearing a hard plastic brace around their torso, parents are more worried than their children about scoliosis itself, said the researchers at Poznan University of Medical Sciences in Poland. The study, published June 15 in the journal Spine, included 63 girls with scoliosis who wore a brace to prevent the spinal curve from worsening. Their average age was 14. In such cases, patients generally must wear the brace at least 12 hours a day until they finish growing. To read more, click here

Scientists Identify Protein Required to Regrow Injured Nerves in Limbs

A protein required to regrow injured peripheral nerves has been identified by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The finding, in mice, has implications for improving recovery after nerve injury in the extremities. It also opens new avenues of investigation toward triggering nerve regeneration in the central nervous system, notorious for its inability to heal. Peripheral nerves provide the sense of touch and drive the muscles that move arms and legs, hands and feet. Unlike nerves of the central nervous system, peripheral nerves can regenerate after they are cut or crushed. But the mechanisms behind the regeneration are not well understood. To read more, click here

Infant Vaccination 'Delays' Triple in Oregon: Study

Oregon has seen a sharp rise in the number of parents who are delaying infant vaccinations, a trend that experts warn raises the risk of outbreaks of serious, even deadly, diseases. Some 9.5 percent of Portland-area parents consistently did not follow the recommended vaccine schedule for their infants between birth and 9 months in 2009, up from 2.5 percent in 2006, a new study finds. Parents were considered consistent "shot limiters" if they never let their kids get more than one or two shots at a time. While many people who limit shots or follow "alternative" vaccine schedules plan to eventually get all the shots, many don't follow through, according to the study. To read more, click here

Inexpensive Approach to Preventing Type 2 Diabetes Shows Promise

A simple, inexpensive method for preventing type 2 diabetes that relies on calling people and educating them on the sort of lifestyle changes they could make to avoid developing the disease has proven effective in a study conducted by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and the City of Berkeley Department of Public Health. The study involved 230 people in poor, urban neighborhoods in the San Francisco Bay Area cities of Richmond, Oakland and Berkeley. Contacted by phone about once a month, half of them received specific dietary guidance and other lifestyle counseling. After six months, those who had received the counseling had on average lost more weight, were consuming less fat, were eating more fruits and vegetables and showed more improvements in lowering in their blood triglycerides, a key risk measure for type 2 diabetes.  To read more, click here

Did You Know That....

Lead-based paint and lead contaminated dust are the main sources of exposure for lead in U.S. children. Lead-based paints were banned for use in housing in 1978. All houses built before 1978 are likely to contain some lead-based paint. However, it is the deterioration of this paint that causes a problem. Approximately 24 million housing units have deteriorated leaded paint and elevated levels of lead-contaminated house dust. More than 4 million of these dwellings are homes to one or more young children.

Brain-Injury Recovery Varies Widely Among Children

Although survival rates for children who sustain brain injuries have improved significantly, it remains difficult to predict how well these children will do in the long term, according to a new evidence review. The recovery of children with brain injuries is complex, and outcomes may vary widely, the British researchers noted. Protecting these brain-injured children from infections and accidents should be a priority, they said. The research, published online June 18 in CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal, also found the age at which children sustain a brain injury will have an effect on their recovery. The authors suggested that the common belief that children's developing brains are more resilient may be naive. To read more, click here

Dramatic Rise in Kids Hospitalized With High Blood Pressure: Study

The number of children hospitalized with high blood pressure nearly doubled in a single decade, according to a new study. Not only are more children being diagnosed with high blood pressure (hypertension), but these children also cost more to treat and stay longer in the hospital, researchers from the University of Michigan said. "The increasing hospitalizations may in part be due to the rise in childhood obesity," said lead researcher Dr. Cheryl Tran, a pediatrician at C.S. Mott Children's Hospital, which is affiliated with the university. To read more, click here

Kids With Autism Face Health Care Disparities, Study Finds

Although children with autism spectrum disorders need more health care services, they have less access to specialized care than children with other conditions, such as asthma or diabetes, according to a new study. The services used by children with autism are also more costly, the researchers from the University of Missouri-Columbia revealed in the report published in the July-September issue of Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders. "Across the board, children with autism spectrum disorders used more health care services, including in-patient stays in the hospital, and required more medications," study co-author Nancy Cheak-Zamora, assistant professor of health sciences in the university's School of Health Professions, said in a university news release. To read more, click here

Food For Thought..........

Always continue the climb. It is possible for you to do whatever you choose, if you first get to know who you are and are willing to work with a power that is greater than ourselves to do it.
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