Week in Review - January 20, 2012

WEEK IN REVIEW

New NASET Publications and Articles of Interest in Special Education and Disabilities That Were Reported This Week

January 20, 2012 - Vol 8, Issue 3

 

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In This Issue

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK


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Dear NASET News,

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEW Here, we provide you with the latest publications from NASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW atnews@naset.org. Have a great weekend.

Sincerely,


NASET News Team


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NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here


Genetics in Special Education

Genetic components presented in this issue:
  • Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

 

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______________________________________________________

IEP Components

Extent of Nonparticipation
The extent of nonparticipation provision is pretty self-evident and highlights the value IDEA places on educating children with disabilities, to the maximum extent appropriate, with children without disabilities. If a child's IEP places the child outside of the regular class, involvement in the general curriculum, and/or participation in extracurricular or nonacademic activities (the meaning of the phrase the activities described in paragraph (a)(4) of this section), the IEP must explain why. The focus of this issue of NASET's IEP Components series is to address the provision of the extent of nonparticipation.


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NYS Regents OK New Rules for Students with Disabilities

Thousands of high-school students with severe disabilities will graduate with "credentials" rather than "diplomas" under a rules change that state Regents approved Monday after years of emotional debate on Long Island and statewide. A key Regents committee also OK'd the potential creation of another graduation document for students with moderate disabilities who are capable of some high-school-level work but unable to pass entire batteries of state exams. The name of that document has not been determined. Monday's twin decisions raise the possibility that graduates at future commencements could be handed one of four different types of exit papers, depending on their level of accomplishment. State education officials who recommended the changes contend the revamped system will encourage more teenagers to complete high school by recognizing differences in individual capacities for academic and vocational training. To read more, click here


Children Exposed to HIV Before Birth at Risk for Language Delay

School-age children exposed to HIV before birth are at increased risk for language problems and could benefit from early diagnosis and classroom intervention, according to a new study. Researchers looked at 468 children, ages 7 to 16, born to mothers with HIV infection during pregnancy. Of those children, 306 were HIV-infected and 162 did not have HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Overall, 35 percent of the children had difficulty understanding spoken words and expressing themselves verbally, said the researchers at the U.S. National Institutes of Health and other institutions. To read more, click here


Did You Know That....

Money, work and the economy continue to be the most frequently cited causes of stress for Americans, as they have every year for the past 5 years. In addition, a growing number of Americans are citing personal health and their family's health as a source of stress.

AASEP Logo

NASET MEMBER'S BENEFIT -

Board Certification in Special Education Available to NASET Members

Through an agreement with The American Academy of Special Education Professionals(AASEP), NASET members now have the opportunity to achieve AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) at a reduced fee.  AASEP Board Certification in Special Education - (B.C.S.E.) is a voluntary choice on the part of the candidate. The candidate for Board Certification wishes to demonstrate a commitment to excellence to employers, peers, administrators, other professionals, and parents. From the standpoint of the Academy, board certification will demonstrate the highest professional competency in the area of special education. Board Certification in Special Educationestablishes a much needed standard for professionals, across disciplines, who work with exceptional children.

 

For more information on Board Certification in Special Education, click here


Connecticut's Reviews Allegations of School Isolating Children with Special Needs in Time-Out Rooms

A practice in some schools to isolate special education students in closed areas denounced as "scream rooms" when they have emotional outbursts has raised concerns among parents and state agency heads. Connecticut's child advocate, Jeanne Milstein, and the Office of Protection and Advocacy for Persons with Disabilities' executive director, James McGaughey, said Thursday they are conducting preliminary investigations after parents raised concerns about use of time-out rooms at Middletown's Farm Hill School. The school's president wrote last week to district officials and Middletown's mayor, saying several parents had contacted her about what they called the "scream rooms" and their worries about the effect on others who hear the disruption. To read more, click here


Normal Pregnancies May Be Misdiagnosed as Ectopic

Women with normal pregnancies that were misdiagnosed as ectopic who were treated with methotrexate in the first trimester either miscarried or gave birth to a severely deformed baby, the results of a small study suggest. An ectopic pregnancy is one where the egg begins to develop outside the womb, which means that the fetus cannot grow normally and will not survive. The drug methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall), which is used to treat rheumatoid arthritis and certain types of cancer, is also known to be dangerous to developing fetuses and can end an ectopic pregnancy. Researchers affiliated with the Organization of Teratology Information Specialists (OTIS) cautioned that their findings, published in the December issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology, may be a red flag for a larger problem. They said more effective tools are needed to properly diagnose ectopic pregnancies. To read more,click here


Did You Know That...
  • According to the American Psychological Association, historically, women report higher levels of stress than men, and this year is no exception.


Autism Units Lacking At Nation's Hospitals

More psychiatric hospitals are working to meet the needs of a burgeoning population of kids with autism and other developmental disabilities, a new study finds, but despite significant growth, services remain limited. Researchers found just nine hospital units across the country that focus specifically on the needs of those with autism and other developmental disorders. That's more than twice the number that existed 10 years ago. Nonetheless, the specialized programs are far from meeting the national need, accounting for just 137 beds at psychiatric hospitals. To read more, click here


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TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Guess the answer to this week's trivia question and we'll recognize you in next week's Week in Review.
Congratulations to:

Olumide Akerele, Mariel Danga, Yvette Jones, Deanna Krieg, Alexandra Pirard, Marilyn Haile, Jessica L. Ulmer, Joanie Dikeman, and Patti Lee Flynn who knew the correct answer to last wee's trivia question:  SPASMODIC DYSPHONIA

 

THIS WEEK'S TRIVIA QUESTION:
According to the latest research done by the American Psychological Association on stress in America, what are the two most common "barriers preventing Americans from creating lifestyle and behavior changes"?

If you know the answer, send an email to contactus@naset.org
All answers must be submitted no later than Monday, January 23, 2012 at 12:00 p.m.


Little Known About How Autism Affects Teen Drivers: Researchers

Two-thirds of driving-age American teens with a high-functioning autism spectrum disorder are currently driving or plan to drive, and these teens have a number of common characteristics, a new study says. People with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders, or HFASDs, have subtle impairments in social interaction, communication, motor skills and coordination. They also have difficulty regulating emotions. Many of these skills are used when driving, noted the researchers at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia's Center for Child Injury Prevention Studies. "Little is known about how HFASDs affect a person's ability to drive safely," study lead author and developmental pediatrician Dr. Patty Huang said in a hospital news release. To read more, click here


How Earbuds Damage the Ears

Chances are all you know about earbuds is that they're easy to carry around and they sound good. Earbuds are useful little devices as long as they're used at low volumes. But they're basically a pair of tiny speakers that you wear inside your ears. And loud music playing that close to your eardrum can cause permanent hearing loss. Believe it or not, earbuds can damage your hearing in the same way that things like chainsaws and motorcycles can. That may seem weird because earbuds are so small. But the damage is all in the volume. To read more, click here


Creating an Anti-Racist Classroom

In an age where classroom teachers find themselves defending their profession and their results, the discussion of race in the classroom seems like one more opportunity for the finger-pointers who seek deeper understanding about the declining academic performance of all American students. The truth is that, after decades of progress in closing the outcome gaps between white students and students of color, the disparities are just as profound today as they were in the 1950's when the landmark case of Brown vs. Board of Education was decided. In some school communities, like New York City, many poor and minority students are attending under-resourced schools that are not only separate and isolated, but that are also just as unequal as they were in the mid-20th century. To read more, click here


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NCLB Waivers Could Undermine Graduation Rates, Group Contends

You've probably heard a lot already about the applications that 11 states have made to waive the major requirements of the No Child Left Behind Act. We've written about their common-core implications, and our federal beat reporters have brought you many details in blog postsand stories. Now a Washington group that focuses on secondary schools is warning that some of those applications-and legislation under consideration in Congress-could weaken high schools' accountability for improving graduation rates. In a policy brief issued this week, the Alliance for Excellent Education says that "the treatment of high school graduation rates in many state accountability indexes may reverse progress made in recent years to ensure accurate graduation rates are fully included in school accountability systems." To read more, click here


Drinking Milk May Help Teen Girls Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Risk

With the recent increase of type 2 diabetes, researchers are focused on finding and reducing risk factors for developing diabetes in adulthood. A number of reports indicate that a high intake of dairy as an adult lowers type 2 diabetes risk. There is now evidence that conditions early in life can impact the chance of getting type 2 diabetes. Even a mother's diet during pregnancy can affect the likelihood of developing the disease. Given the positive effects of a diet high in dairy in adults, it is possible that high dairy intake as a teenager may help prevent type 2 diabetes. To read more, click here


Supreme Court Declines To Hear IDEA Case

The U.S. Supreme Court said this week that it will not consider a special education case that raised questions about whether or not school districts should be liable if they fail to identify a child's special needs. The case was brought by a California mother who said that her local school district did not identify her daughter's disabilities even as teachers reported that the 10th-grader "colored with crayons at her desk, played with dolls in class and urinated on herself." The student, known as Addison in court papers, went without special education services and continued to be promoted to the next grade, her mother alleged. To read more, click here


Did You Know That....

Not only do men and women manage stress differently, they also place a different level of importance on doing so. Men report being less concerned about managing stress and are more likely to say they are doing enough in this area, whereas women place more emphasis on the need to do so but feel they are not doing well enough.


Washington Lawmakers Aim to Strengthen Teacher Evaluations

A bipartisan group of Washington state lawmakers announced plans Thursday to make statewide evaluations of teachers and principals more rigorous and uniform. Before a hearing room packed with education reform advocates, Rep. Eric Pettigrew, D-Seattle, acknowledged that not everyone would be happy with the proposed changes. "It's hard to be here when you're bucking against the system, the way things have always been done," he said. "It is our obligation as leaders to make sure every single child in this country has the opportunity to succeed." To read more, click here


ESEA Bills Are 'Full Retreat From Accountability' for Special Education

The new House Republican bills that tackle reforming the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (otherwise known as No Child Left Behind) "represent a full retreat from accountability for students with disabilities and other disadvantaged children," the National Center for Learning Disabilities said this week. Like the Senate rewrite of NCLB, the Republican bills would do away with adequate yearly progress, the crux of the law and the mechanism by which schools are held accountable for their students' performance. That's the big problem with the bills, NCLD's executive director, James Wendorf, said. To read more, click here


Antidepressants While Pregnant Linked to Slight Risk of Lung Problem in Babies

Women who use antidepressants called selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors such as Prozac and Celexa during pregnancy run a slight risk of having an infant with high blood pressure in the lungs, a new Swedish study finds. The condition, known as persistent pulmonary hypertension, can lead to shortness of breath and difficulty breathing. Although rare, severe disease is associated with heart failure, the investigators noted. "Infants born to women treated with SSRIs in late pregnancy had a twofold increased risk [of] their infants having persistent pulmonary hypertension," said lead researcher Dr. Helle Kieler, head of the Centre for Pharmacoepidemiology at Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm. To read more, click here


Food For Thought..........


Adopting the right attitude can convert a negative stress into a positive one.
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