Week in Review - February 18, 2011

WEEK IN REVIEW

New NASET Publications and Articles of Interest in Special Education and Disabilities That Were Reported This Week

February 18, 2011 - Vol 7, Issue 7

 

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In This Issue

New This Week on NASET

Surgery on Fetus Reduces Complications of Spina Bifida
Los Angeles' Disaster Plan Discriminates Against Individuals with Disabilities
Experts Urge Even Greater Caution in the Use of X-Rays During Pregnancy and Infancy
Report on Children with ADHD Shows That They Are Often Also Diagnosed with Other Mental Health
Justice Departments Warns Virginia Of Suit Over Failures
From 'Blue Babies' to Healthy Adults
Testosterone Level May Be Linked to Empathy, Autism
TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK
Individual with Quadriplegia Sues Disney After Being Stranded on "It's A Small World"
The Dog Days of Winter: Making Treats is a Special Treat for Students with Special Needs
Handwriting Problem Affects Children with Autism into the Teenage Years
Folic Acid During Pregnancy May Increase the Risk of Asthma in Children
Mississippi Lawmaker Introduces Intellectual Disabilities Legislative Package
Colorado Program Targets Progress for Students with Special Needs
School Attorney at IEP Meeting-Parents Walk Out
Health at Birth Tied to ADHD Risk
West Virginia House Passes Autism Bill, 96-1
 

Dear NASET Members:

Welcome to NASET's WEEK in REVIEWHere, we provide you with the latest publications from NASET to read and or download, as well as some of the most interesting articles that have happened this week in the field of special education. We hope you enjoy this publication.  Feel free to send us articles for this publication or let us know your thoughts about the WEEK in REVIEW at news@naset.org. Have a great weekend.
 
Sincerely,


NASET News Team

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New This Week on NASET

Discipline of Students in Special Education Series


What is Basis of Knowledge?

 

Can IDEA's discipline protections be applied to, or claimed by, children not previously determined to be eligible for special education and related services under IDEA? Perhaps an example would clarify what this question is really asking. Suppose this situation: A student who has not yet been found to be a "child with a disability" under IDEA has violated a code of student conduct. The school system takes disciplinary action according to its policies-at which time the student asserts that, in fact, he or she is a "child with a disability" as IDEA defines that term and that the protections under IDEA must guide the discipline policies that are applied. Is this permissible? Answer: Of course the answer is "sometimes" and "under certain circumstances." The pivot point, without a doubt, is whether or not the school system had knowledge that the child was a "child with a disability" when the child violated the code of student conduct. This is called "Basis of Knowledge" and is the focus of this issue of NASET's Discipline of Students in Special Education Series.

 

To read or download this issue - Click here  (login required)

 

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Genetics in Special Education Series


Genetic components presented in this issue:

  • Noonan Syndrome
  • Thalassemia -

To read or download this issue - Click here  (login required) 

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Journal of the American Academy of Special Education Professionals (JAASEP)

Winter 2011

Articles presented in this issue:

    • Effective Teacher Behaviors Evident in Successful Teachers of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders
    • Students with Mild Mental Retardation Participating in Recess
    • Teaching Artists: Serving Special Education Students in Local Schools
    • A Multi-Faceted Approach to Successful Transition for Students with Intellectual Disabilities
    • High School Teacher Perceptions of the Student Assistance Team Process
    • A Review of Research on the Educational Benefits of the Inclusive Model of Education for Special Education Students
    • The Millennial Generation Special Education Teacher: Promise or Problem
    • One-to-one in the Inclusive Classroom:  The Perspectives of Paraeducators Who Support Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder
    • An Investigative Study on the Learning Difficulties in Mathematics Encountered by Primary 4 Children: In Search of a Cognitive Equation for Mathematics Learning
    • The Role of Self-Efficacy on Job Readiness s and Career Choice among People with Intellectual Disability in Singapore-

To read or download this issue - Click here  (login required)

Surgery on Fetus Reduces Complications of Spina Bifida

A surgical procedure to repair a common birth defect of the spine, if undertaken while a baby is still in the uterus, greatly reduces the need to divert, or shunt, fluid away from the brain, according to a study by the National Institutes of Health and four research institutions. The surgical procedure consists of closing an opening at the back of the fetal spine.  The fetal surgery is a departure from the traditional approach, which involves repairing the defect in the spinal column after an infant has been born. The fetal surgical procedure also increases the chances that a child will be able to walk without crutches or other devices. To read more, click here

Los Angeles' Disaster Plan Discriminates Against Individuals with Disabilities

The city of Los Angeles is discriminating against people with disabilities by not including them in city disaster planning, according to a district court judge. The city of Los Angeles is unprepared to meet the needs of the disabled in the case of a disaster and is discriminating against them by failing to include the disabled in its emergency preparedness plans, a federal judge ruled last Friday.Siding with disability-rights groups who sued the city on behalf of an estimated 800,000 disabled L.A. residents, U.S. District Court Judge Consuelo B. Marshall found that Los Angeles doesn't have a plan to notify and evacuate the disabled or provide them with transportation and shelter in a disaster. "Because of the city's failure to address their unique needs, individuals with disabilities are disproportionately vulnerable to harm in the event of an emergency or disaster," the judge wrote, noting that the city's own Department on Disability reported in 2008 that disabled residents are "at-risk for suffering and death in disproportionate numbers." To read more, click here

Did You Know That.....

Neuropsychology is the study of the psychological effects of brain damage in individuals.

Experts Urge Even Greater Caution in the Use of X-Rays During Pregnancy and Infancy

Clinicians should be careful about using x-rays on pregnant women and infants because of the potential for a slight increase in the risk of children developing cancer, concludes a new study published on the British Medical Journal website. The study is consistent with what doctors have long suspected, and why women of childbearing age are always asked about the possibility of pregnancy before being x- rayed. A UK-US collaborative study found small increases in risk of cancer for children who had x-rays at ages less than three months and in children whose mothers had undergone an x-ray while pregnant. These increases were not statistically significant. The researchers report no increased risk from ultrasound scans. To read more, click here

Report on Children with ADHD Shows That They Are Often Also

Diagnosed with Other Mental Health and/or Developmental Issues

It has been reported that two thirds of children in the United States that have attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder also suffer from other mental health and developmental issues, these issues include learning disabilities and anxiety. A recent study examined data on almost 62,000 children from ages 6 to 17. In the data obtained from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health, researchers found that children with ADHD were more likely to repeat a grade at school and deal with strained familial and social relationships. Interestingly, children from low-income families were nearly four times more likely as affluent children to suffer from the multiple conditions afflicting children with ADHD, also including discipline problems, depression, and problems with speech. To read more, click here

Justice Departments Warns Virginia Of Suit Over Failures

In a 20-page assessment of Virginia's care for the disabled released Friday, federal investigators detail hundreds of mentally and physically challenged people languishing in state facilities, subject to harm and neglect. "Virtually no one who has been institutionalized long-term ... ever leaves," one section of the report states, referring to residents at the sprawling Central Virginia Training Center in Lynchburg. "Some individuals have been ready for discharge for a decade or more," the report states, noting a rate of release to community-based care so low that "the vast majority" of center residents "will not move into the community in their lifetime." To read more, click here

Did You Know That......

MRI technology has been applied with great success to the measurement of brain activity. Conventional techniques of functional MRI (fMRI) produce images of the increase in oxygen flow in the blood to active areas of the brain.

From 'Blue Babies' to Healthy Adults

When Donna Stiener needed a valve replaced in her heart, she knew exactly where she would go: Johns Hopkins Hospital, more than 150 miles from her home in Easton, Pa. The common surgery could have been handled at other hospitals. But Hopkins surgeons had saved her life six decades earlier with their pioneering treatment for "blue babies" - those starved for oxygen by a heart defect called tetralogy of Fallot. And ever since, she had insisted on returning for treatment, making sure each time to pause for a prayer at a statue of Jesus in the rotunda. Today, almost all "blue babies" like Stiener live to be adults. But the early surgical victories, and all the advances to follow for congenital heart defects, have created a new problem: caring for the aging patients is uncharted territory. To read more, click here

Testosterone Level May Be Linked to Empathy, Autism

New research shows the male hormone testosterone can interfere with a person's ability to feel empathy and could play a role in the development of autism. For this study, women were given a small dose of testosterone. Researchers found those women were then less able to judge the moods of pictures of facial expressions they were shown. Experts say babies exposed to more testosterone in the womb may be more likely to develop autism. To read more, click here

TRIVIA QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Congratulations to: 
 

Sabrina Valdez, Linda Tolbert, Catherine Davis, Susie Addington, Stacey Lee, Carla Adler, Christina M. McCaw, Sabrina Yacoub, Lorrie Weaver, Alison Lannutti, Terri Trent, Judy Pickeral, Yvette Jones, Nan Porter, Laura Hayes, Caitlin Carlsen, Roberta Star Schryver, Gloria J. Ortiz, Linda Tilson, Terry Koogle, Stacie Bonner, Amanda Childress, Lois Nembhard, Rebecca E. Arroyo, Leslie McDermott, Deanna Krieg, Doreen Robinson, Christie Miller, Patricia A. Williams, Pattie Komons, Heather Benson, Tina Theuerkauf, Catherine Cardenas, Francine McDermott, Gretchen van Besouw, Alexandra Pirard, Jessica Ulmer, Francine Caires, Yewbee Woodson, and Amy Williford  who knew that ADHD can be found in the IDEIA definition of OTHER HEALTH IMPAIRMENT.

 

THIS WEEK'S TRIVIA QUESTION: 

This disease of the central nervous system (meaning "many scar tissues") is characterized by the destruction of the myelin sheath surrounding neurons, resulting in the formation of "plaques". What is its name?

 

Individual with Quadriplegia Sues Disney After Being Stranded on "It's A Small World"

Jose Martinez of San Pedro, California, has filed a lawsuit in US District Court in Los Angeles, contending that the Walt Disney Co. "violated the Americans with Disabilities Act by failing to have adequate evacuation procedures for visitors with mobility disabilities." According to the lawsuit, Martinez, who is a quadriplegic, was left "inside his wheelchair on a [stalled] ride boat for about 40 minutes while other visitors were evacuated." Martinez's attorney said, "In my opinion, if you are going to put him on the ride, there needs to be a safe and effective way to get him off the ride." A Disneyland Resort spokeswoman said, "Disneyland Resort is accessible to guests with varying needs, including those with mobility disabilities. If it is necessary to evacuate an attraction, we have procedures in place for all guests." To read more, click here

The Dog Days of Winter: Making Treats is a Special Treat for Students with Special Needs

Simple household items like bran flakes, oats, honey, eggs and flour are giving a few students at Jeffersonville High School a bit of hands-on experience. The students, who are part of a special needs career class at the high school, are pouring all of the above together and manufacturing all-natural dog treats. In the last week, they've cooked up about 50 batches of the treats, which come in small, medium and large bone shapes. Staff and administration at the school are treating their pets and purchasing the goods for $2 per bag. It's called the JHS "Barkery" and it's an all-hands project for the 30-student class. The purpose is to teach the students entry level vocational skills, said Paula Kruer, teacher who's coordinating the effort. Students at work in the kitchen Thursday morning seemed to be enjoying it as well. To read more, click here

President Obama Tight-Lipped on Special Education Funding

When a local school board member met with President Barack Obama this week, he pressed for the federal government to fully fund the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, or IDEA. The president said little in response. The exchange took place during a White House meeting Tuesday when Edward McCormick, who serves on a school board in Poughkeepsie, N.Y. and chairs the National Black Caucus of School Board Members, encouraged the president to meet the federal government's initial commitment to fund 40 percent of the cost of special education. Traditionally IDEA has been federally funded at less than 20 percent. To read more, click here

Handwriting Problem Affects Children with Autism into the Teenage Years

A new study suggests that the handwriting problems that affect children with autism are likely to continue into their teenage years. The research is published in the November 16, 2010, issue of Neurology┬«, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study included 24 girls and boys between the age of 12 and 16. Half of the group had autism spectrum disorder and all of the teenagers scored within the normal range of perceptual reasoning on an IQ test. The teens were given the Minnesota Handwriting Assessment Test, which uses a scrambled sentence to eliminate any speed advantage for more fluent readers. The sentence used on the test was "the brown jumped lazy fox quick dogs over." Participants were asked to copy the words in the sentence, making the letters the same size and shape as the sample using their best handwriting. To read more, click here

Folic Acid During Pregnancy May Increase the Risk of Asthma in Children

Recent Norwegian research suggests that there may be a connection between high levels of folic acid in pregnant mothers and the development of asthma in their children. However, the researchers stress that pregnant women should continue to take folic acid supplements as recommended by their doctors. In Norway all women planning a pregnancy and those in the early stages of pregnancy are told to take a folic acid supplement to promote normal fetal development. The reason for this is that folic acid supplements taken during pregnancy reduce the risk of spina bifida in newborns. A recent study, carried out with funding from the Research Council and data from the large-scale Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa), indicates that the effects of folic acid may not be as categorically positive as had been thought. To read more, click here

 

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Mississippi Lawmaker Introduces Intellectual Disabilities Legislative Package

U.S. Representative Gregg Harper (R-Miss.) introduced a legislative package today which aims to streamline federal programs and services intended to support youth with significant disabilities from adolescence to adulthood and rebalance federal funding to focus on improved outcomes in post-secondary education and integrated employment. The three bills, collectively referred to as the "Transition toward Excellence, Achievement and Mobility" (TEAM Act), seek to promote meaningful post-secondary educational and employment opportunities for individuals living with intellectual disabilities. Harper's proposal intends for these citizens to gain full-time employment in an integrated setting at a livable wage leading to long-term career development and inclusion in the community through independent living and social engagement. "In order for individuals living with intellectual and developmental disabilities to reach their maximum potential, Congress must enact a systems change," said Harper. "The current federal disability laws are hopelessly outdated and will ultimately lead to unemployment and poverty for these children." To read more, click here

Did You Know That........

An electroencephalogram (EEG) is a measure of the gross electrical activity of the brain.

Colorado Program Targets Progress for Students with Special Needs

RE-1 Valley School District in Colorado is working on impacting achievement for students with disabilities. Laurie Kjosness, special services director for RE-1, shared information about how they're doing this at a district inservice last week.  She talked about a program they've been working on in the district for students with disabilities that was brought to the district through the Colorado Department of Education.  "Even though the fact that half our students (with disabilities) have not yet achieved proficiency on the state content standards, and that a wide achievement continues, shows how much work needs to be done," Kjosness said.  To address this problem the district looked at steps to improve where students are currently and where they need to be. They reviewed district and student data, not only with general education teachers, but also special education teachers. To read more, click here

School Attorney at IEP Meeting-Parents Walk Out

I am an attorney practicing Special Education. I do not attend IEP meetings. We have an advocacy service and an advocate attends IEP meetings with parents. In our district, when an advocate from our advocacy service attends an IEP meeting, the district makes sure their attorney is also present. The parents request that the school attorney leave. The district's attorney states she is there because she is representing the district, not because she has special knowledge and expertise regarding the child. The parents and the advocate leave because of the hostile adversary environment. The IEP is held without the parents. Here is my question ... I believe that the IEP is not appropriate because the parents did not have an opportunity to participate. Is this cause for a Due Process Complaint? To read more, click here

Health at Birth Tied to ADHD Risk

A baby's health in the first minutes after birth may be linked to his or her risk of developing attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) later on, a new study suggests. The findings, reported in the Journal of Pediatrics, suggest that the so-called Apgar score assigned to all newborns in the first five minutes of life may give some hint of a child's future risk of ADHD, a condition that involves attention problems and impulsive behavior. A newborn's Apgar score is based on several physical signs, including breathing, heart rate and muscle tone. A score of 7 or higher is considered normal, with a 9 or 10 indicating that the baby is in the "best possible condition." To read more, click here

West Virginia House Passes Autism Bill, 96-1

Bills often spark extensive debate on the House floor before they pass or fail, but last Thursday, action on the House autism bill drew repeated offerings of praise and thanks after it passed.

HB 2693 mandates state -- PEIA and WVCHIP -- and private insurance providers other than the selfinsured to provide coverage for children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders. 

 The House Finance Committee had changed the bill last week to add coverage caps, but in response to a lukewarm reception to the caps, Finance Chairman Harry Keith White changed it again to include more liberal caps. Last week's committee substitute called for an annual $30,000 limit on applied behavior analysis (ABA) treatment for children ages 3-6 and $1,000 a month for ages 7-18. To read more, click here 

Food For Thought.........

The philosophy of the school room in one generation will be the philosophy of government in the next.

                                                       Abraham Lincoln

 

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